Searching for a Home in Canada: Weathered Steel on Nova Scotia’s Shores

The gatehouse shed has bare stud walls, with a wood-burning stove and daybed under a pair of large timbers attached to the wall. An outdoor BBQ and pizza oven are built into an exterior stone wall and a hot tub is built into a granite-paved patio.

The property – one of several dozen designed by Mr MacKay-Lyons as part of a new village on the site – is a 10-minute walk from Hirtle Beach and Gaff Point, a hiking trail from 4.3 miles in a nature reserve on a narrow peninsula jutting out into the Atlantic. Restaurants, cafes, bakeries and shops can be found near Rose Bay, LaHave and West Dublin across the LaHave River.

The property is 13 miles from the port town of Lunenburg, a British colonial settlement planned in 1753 and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with colorful buildings along its waterfront and restaurants, distilleries, of the city’s distinctive breweries, artisans and shops. Big box stores are 20 minutes away in Bridgewater. Halifax, the capital and largest city of Nova Scotia, is 75 miles away and Halifax Stanfield International Airport is 80 miles away.

The pandemic has boosted Nova Scotia’s housing market, which had been buzzing for years.

An initial shutdown of a few months was followed by a “rush of people” from Toronto and other Canadian urban centers, said John Duckworth, broker and co-owner of Duckworth Real Estate. “Properties were being scavenged at lightning speed,” he said, with many sold unseen.

Donna Malone, president of the Nova Scotia Association of Realtors, noted that Nova Scotia has offered a relaxed, low-density environment for remote workers. “Large family homes, which had been a bit depressed, became popular with buyers, as did waterfront properties,” Ms Malone said.

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