Science Wonders – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 07:08:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Science Wonders – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Rose-Hulman MLK Day Event Features Pioneering Mars Rover Engineer | Local News https://chattahoocheetrace.com/rose-hulman-mlk-day-event-features-pioneering-mars-rover-engineer-local-news/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 05:38:22 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/rose-hulman-mlk-day-event-features-pioneering-mars-rover-engineer-local-news/ Interested participants can register at https://bit.ly/3I5gWyp “Dr. Cooper’s remarkable life story shows that people’s aspirations can be limitless,” said Nick Davis, director of the Center for diversity and inclusion of Rose-Hulman “She is a great role model for our students, especially women in science and technology, because she can easily relate to them and their […]]]>

Interested participants can register at https://bit.ly/3I5gWyp “Dr. Cooper’s remarkable life story shows that people’s aspirations can be limitless,” said Nick Davis, director of the Center for diversity and inclusion of Rose-Hulman “She is a great role model for our students, especially women in science and technology, because she can easily relate to them and their career ambitions. She has achieved her dreams, and they can too.

Cooper’s work with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is seen as integral to the Perseverance rover’s ongoing mission, since it landed on February 18, 2021, to determine if Mars could be habitable for humans. She is also responsible for protecting the Red Planet from any contaminants from Earth.

Cooper is the recipient of several awards, including the NASA Early Career Public Achievement Medal, the Charles Elachi Award for Exceptional Early Career Achievement, and the JPL Voyager Awards for Technical Leadership.

Cooper enjoys talking about her work to children from underrepresented communities and has appeared on the TV shows ‘Because Space’ and ‘Bill Nye Saves the World’. She enjoys introducing people to the wonders of the world of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics (STEAM), and empowering organizations and others to achieve their dreams and overcome obstacles which she imparts from articulated way through the story of his life. After graduating from high school at age 16, Cooper studied physics as an undergraduate, earned a master’s degree, and earned a doctorate in mechanical engineering at age 24 with a thesis on spacecraft materials.

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Mysterious purple coating found on Mars rocks https://chattahoocheetrace.com/mysterious-purple-coating-found-on-mars-rocks/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 11:02:42 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/mysterious-purple-coating-found-on-mars-rocks/ The red dust paints Mars in red hues, from the surface to the sky. But NASA’s Perseverance rover spotted bands of another color among the rusty hues. At nearly every site visited by the robotic geologist, the Martian Palace includes purple. The color forms a thin, smooth layer on some stones and leaves paint-like drops […]]]>

The red dust paints Mars in red hues, from the surface to the sky. But NASA’s Perseverance rover spotted bands of another color among the rusty hues. At nearly every site visited by the robotic geologist, the Martian Palace includes purple.

The color forms a thin, smooth layer on some stones and leaves paint-like drops on others. Other rocks appear to have been partially frosted in a magenta glaze, says anne ollila, a Los Alamos National Laboratory geochemist who presented a first analysis of the coatings at a recent American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference.

The color hits rocks of all different shapes and sizes – even tiny pebbles haven’t escaped the splashes of purple. But how, exactly, did these coatings form? “I don’t really have a good answer for you,” says Ollila.

Scientists are eager to learn more. “There’s a lot to look forward to as we continue to do analysis,” says Nina Lanza, the team leader for space and planetary exploration at Los Alamos National Laboratory, who studied the coatings alongside Ollila.

The origin of the mysterious spots could help reveal clues to Mars’ past, including whether it could have harbored ancient life. As the coatings formed, they could have encoded information about surrounding conditions into their chemical and mineral makeup, helping scientists reconstruct environments long gone. They could also contain more direct evidence of life: on Earth, microbes help make many similar stone veneers.

Studying these types of crusts can also help scientists better understand how other worlds work. “How universal are geological processes and how do they change from planet to planet?” wonders Cassandra Marnocha, an environmental microbiologist at Niagara University in New York.

painted purple

The purple Martian coatings have been found in Jezero Crater, a 28-mile-wide pockmark destroyed by a meteorite impact billions of years ago that once housed an ancient lake. Perseverance landed in the crater in February 2021 and has been roaming through it ever since. At nearly every stop along the rover’s route, purple flashes appeared in its footage.

While rock coverings aren’t a new discovery on Mars, Jezero’s frequent purple spots have left scientists scratching their heads.

“These particular purple spots that we haven’t really seen with past rover missions,” says Bradley Garczynski from Purdue University, which also presented an analysis of the coatings at the recent AGU conference. Garczynski studies coatings using images from a pair of cameras called Mastcam Z, which are “essentially the scientific eyes of the rover,” he says. By capturing images using various filters that block certain wavelengths of light, scientists can get a rough idea of ​​the composition of the rock.

Ollila and his colleagues take a closer look at the coatings using the rover’s SuperCam, who can fire a laser at a rock to vaporize a small piece of material and determine its elemental composition. Each laser shot also digs a small pit in the surface and produces a snapping sound. A microphone on the rover picks up the noise, allowing scientists to hear when the laser cuts through the liner and into the rock below. These sounds also reveal clues to some of the rock’s properties, such as its hardness.

Early results from these analyzes show that the purple color appears to be a softer, chemically distinct layer of the rock below. Mastcam-Z images suggest the coatings may contain types of iron oxide, Garczynski says. And SuperCam analyzes suggest they are enriched with hydrogen and sometimes magnesium, says Ollila.

The presence of hydrogen suggests that water played a role in the formation of the purple spots. Iron oxide also points to water, similar to the rust that forms on a bike left out in the rain. Further study could unlock a wealth of information about the Red Planet’s wet past, including how long water has been in Jezero Crater and, perhaps, the chemistry of the lake itself. “The presence of coatings could be a key part of this story,” says Garczynski.

However, the location of the purple spots presents a bit of a mystery. The current course of Perseverance does not cross lake sediments, but rather rocks which formed from cooling magma. How the rocks got to their current location on the crater floor – and when and how the water made contact – remains unclear. “If I had to guess where to find coatings in all this material set in Jezero, it probably wouldn’t be here,” says Lanza.

So far, the team has only analyzed a few samples and still faces many challenges. SuperCam’s different chemical readings and changes in laser sounds don’t always seem to line up, Ollila notes. Separating the chemical signatures from the coatings, the underlying rock, and the ubiquitous dust on the Martian surface is complex. And Mars’ strong winds limit when scientists can hear the laser clicks.

“Mars doesn’t make it easy for us,” says Lanza.

Microbial sunscreen

On Earth, these veneers are often linked to life, which means Martian rock coverings could be a major boon for astrobiologists.

The nooks and crannies of a rock can create a tiny haven for microbes in harsh environments, Marnocha says, providing nutrients, a shield from the sun or moisture in otherwise dry landscapes. Some of these microbes help make coatings by metabolizing metals mined from the surface of rock or dissolved in water. On Mars, coatings could even help preserve evidence of ancient microbes long after they died by preventing intense solar radiation from Mars from degrading delicate organic structures.

The first hints of rock coverings on Mars were spotted during the viking missions, which landed on the Red Planet in the mid-1970s. But it took a lot more ground wheels to identify the dark spots as coatings rather than spots on the surface, Marnocha says.

Of particular excitement was the discovery of manganese-rich dark coatings in Gale Crater, where the Curiosity rover is currently scanning the Martian surface. The discovery is tantalizingly reminiscent of a particular type of rock covering on Earth known as varnish, which tends to be filled with tiny life forms. In a recent survey of nail polishes across the United States, scientists uncovered “the who’s who of known radiation-resistant bacteria,” says Chris Yeager, environmental microbiologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Yeager and his colleagues found that a particular type of cyanobacteria appears to be key to the manganese content of varnish, concentrate the metal to protect against the sun’s harmful rays, much like sunscreen.

The new coatings found at Jezero lack the manganese required to be considered varnish, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be associated with ancient microbial life, Lanza says. “Who knows what the Martian microbes are doing?

The team hopes to further unravel the chemistry of the coatings and search for organic matter associated with Martian crusts, which could hint at the presence of microbes. But bringing the rocks back to Earth for lab analysis is one of the few ways to definitively determine how the purple spots formed.

Perseverance has drilled samples of Martian rock as it passes through the crater, sealing them in tubes that will be cached on the surface of Mars for a future mission back to Earth. Although the purple coatings are fragile, Ollila hopes some can withstand the sampling process so scientists can examine them more closely in the future.

In the meantime, the team is excited to continue their work as Perseverance heads into the Jezero Delta, a sprawling fan of sediment deposited by ancient rivers flowing into the crater. “We’re just at the very beginning,” says Lanza. “It’s just one type of material that we’re likely to encounter, and I think there’s a lot of discoveries ahead of us.”

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Calgary Area Observatory celebrates 50 years under the stars https://chattahoocheetrace.com/calgary-area-observatory-celebrates-50-years-under-the-stars/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:53:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/calgary-area-observatory-celebrates-50-years-under-the-stars/ It’s been 50 years to the day since the doors of the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory near Priddis, Alta., Were opened to the public – and as co-founder Alan Clark remembers, it was about as cold. that day than today. Clark, who is also a professor emeritus in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the […]]]>

It’s been 50 years to the day since the doors of the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory near Priddis, Alta., Were opened to the public – and as co-founder Alan Clark remembers, it was about as cold. that day than today.

Clark, who is also a professor emeritus in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Calgary, said the trip certainly did not look like 50 years ago.

“Strangely enough, I came from Britain at the right time – or at the wrong time, depending on how you look at it,” Clark said. The straight line.

“[It was decided] that one way to attract students was to start teaching astronomy, which many universities in North America had started to do. “

In 1970, Clark was commissioned to design an observatory to support the new undergraduate program in astronomy.

The program was eventually offered a quarter section of dirt by Sandy Cross, who was a top breeder.

Clark said that aside from the discoveries the observatory has made over the years, what makes him most proud are all of the students who have been trained over the years.

“Many of them have held very high positions in astronomy around the world,” he said.

In addition to education, the observatory also offers doors open to the public and offers various courses to high school students.

Rothney Astrophysical Observatory near Priddis, photographed in 1994. (Submitted by Rothney Astrophysical Observatory)

Of course, the observatory has also been host to discoveries, such as when Rob Cardinal, searching for an asteroid while using the Baker-Nunn telescope, found a comet instead.

“This comet now bears his name in perpetuity,” said Clark.

“It is to his credit that he rose to teaching astronomy courses on all of the reserves in Alberta. Being a native himself, he thinks this is a very important way to involve young people in science.

Clark said he wants people to visit the facility so that they can experience the wonders it offers.

“It was always about education,” he said.



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A rising tide that doesn’t lift everything https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-rising-tide-that-doesnt-lift-everything/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-rising-tide-that-doesnt-lift-everything/ Don’t worry if you can’t remember the melody – I go back 30 years for the lyrics, which are courtesy of One-Hit Wonders Timbuk3. Going back three decades like this is the kind of trick that comes your way, something you almost accidentally start doing. As always, Philip Larkin expressed it better than anyone: “I […]]]>

Don’t worry if you can’t remember the melody – I go back 30 years for the lyrics, which are courtesy of One-Hit Wonders Timbuk3.

Going back three decades like this is the kind of trick that comes your way, something you almost accidentally start doing. As always, Philip Larkin expressed it better than anyone: “I started saying ‘a quarter of a century ago’ or thirty years ago about my own life.

“It takes my breath away.”

Well described. You go from an assessment of how long events last per month, or maybe a year or two, to an abrupt onset of dispersal of decades like awakening in a wake.

Which was a much more common term three decades ago. Or even more.

I am raising the issue here because this is traditionally when deadlines are highlighted; this is the time of year when we start planning and planning for the near future. A quick clarification – I am referring specifically to realistic and actual plans, and not unrealistic pipe dreams tied directly to the date: the concept of New Years resolution is and remains verboten on this page (now to be read).

The shots I’m referring to are those that stretch out into the distance like railroad tracks heading towards the horizon, seeming to meet halfway.

An example? I’m glad you asked.

I spent an hour or two at the new park near the marina at Christmas, the one near Pairc Ui Chaoimh.

If that still seems a bit bare, the early days – there’s plenty of room to get creative with landscaping, whether it’s planting a stand of trees here and there to break up that nudity or installing some trees. bushes to line the walkways. A large scale play area would be an asset. The central building I’m still a bit agnostic about – does it provide shelter or is the roof just too high off the ground to keep the rain from protecting itself?

Once again, however: the place has just opened. Give it time. This is the kind of large-scale installation that will likely be needed soon enough.

Marina Park opened to the public last month. This new park is part of the general redevelopment of the southern docks leading to the marina. Photo: Michael O’Sullivan / OSM PHOTO

Readers will know the great plans for this general area of ​​the city, whether it is the specific plan to create a new city, almost, along the quay by R&H Hall and behind that among the old industrial units, or the general turning the city to face the river, pushing more and more towards the Marina. Wave, more ambitious plans to locate a hospital in the area and perhaps another passage downstream to Tivoli reinforce this feeling of a city on the bend, outward to the sea.

This is a notion with a strong historical context, and Barcelona is generally Exhibit A in any discussion of city realignment. As part of its transformation at the time of the 1992 Olympics – again, just three decades ago – the city authorities took the opportunity to transform an old-fashioned and dilapidated industrial area near the waterfront. sea, Poblenou, in an Olympic village. Subsequently, the neighborhood became one of the coolest neighborhoods in the city, earning a reputation for tech start-ups and hip breweries.

There is already a brewery on the south quay, of course. Who wouldn’t love to see the rest of the area follow their Barcelona counterpart?

A river crosses it

Yours truly was thinking that way until a friend helpfully handed you an interactive graphic on climate change – one that you can download to your own device and insert your own location, seeing the results of the rise in sea level of two, four or six feet.

This is not your first warning in this direction. You probably read about the cloud on the horizon in these pages last August, when Steven Heaney wrote: “A new joint report from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Met Éireann (ME) and the Marine Institute ( MI) warming has resulted in Ireland’s climate becoming warmer and wetter, with 15 of the 20 warmest years on record since 1990 … with a large portion of the Irish population living near the coast, sea level rise has the potential to completely reshape the country over the next few decades.

“To illustrate how serious these changes could be, Coastal Climate Central, an independent, nonprofit group of scientists and communicators who study our changing climate and how it affects people’s lives, has created what they call a “coastal risk screening tool”. “

Applying this tool to our own native moor has shown severe flooding, Steven adding: “Several towns and villages in Cork including Youghal, Kinsale, Shanagarry, Ballycotton and Timoleague are showing major topographic changes. In Cork City too, the screenings make viewing anxious.

“By 2050, the River Lee has grown considerably, leaving most of the city center, marina, docks and Tivoli colored red.

“A little further on, the map shows much of Blackrock, Jacob’s Island, Rochestown and Douglas overtaken by the rising waters.”

That means in 30 years – 30, again! – the areas that we plan to develop and colonize could well be underwater. Billions of euros spent on what – a remake of Water world, and without even the small consolation of seeing Kevin Costner with gills behind his ears?

At this point, I admit that I have some flexibility in my own gaze. When the Marina Wharf expansion and development plans emerged, I thought of them a great idea – the ideal marriage of expediency and convenience, with new life for a part of the city that had seen better, or at least more busy, days. Use. Accommodation. Now?

A multi-million euro plan for Cork City docks has been announced, which would include the reallocation of the historic Odlums Mills building.  But will this area be underwater in 30 years due to climate change?  Photo: Eamonn Farrell / RollingNews.ie
A multi-million euro plan for Cork City docks has been announced, which would include the reallocation of the historic Odlums Mills building. But will this area be underwater in 30 years due to climate change? Photo: Eamonn Farrell / RollingNews.ie

The development of the docklands now seems like a fitting referendum, or perhaps a reflective experiment, on how seriously we take climate change. As in we can have an abstract sense of what this means, but here we see a much more concrete example.

What is the point of creating thousands of houses in a particular area when there is every chance that this place will be inundated in 30 years?

This is the question asked in its crudest form. You can walk from Patrick Street past the Marina Market or Pairc Ui Chaoimh in half an hour, and the reality is right there in front of you. The possibility that these places – and everywhere in between – will be under a few feet of water in your lifetime seems hard to imagine, no pun intended, but that’s what science is telling us.

In all fairness, there are alternatives. Hundreds of homes are planned in areas as remote as Tower, north of the city, and Knockgriffin on the outskirts of Midleton. Should we double down on these kinds of “new cities” instead of engaging in developments facing immersion within a few decades?

Let’s look north and east. The future is so bright that wearing rubber boots doesn’t quite sound the same. As I discovered, three decades does not pass long.

What is the point of creating such houses when there is a chance that a place will soon be flooded?


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the science behind climate change has a female name https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-science-behind-climate-change-has-a-female-name/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 02:33:49 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-science-behind-climate-change-has-a-female-name/ This is an opinion piece by Ana García Page, doctoral student in Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics at the German Max Planck Institute for Chemical Solids Physics, and José Ramón Ares, Professor of Physics at the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, there has been global concern about the climate, largely due to the increasing […]]]>

This is an opinion piece by Ana García Page, doctoral student in Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics at the German Max Planck Institute for Chemical Solids Physics, and José Ramón Ares, Professor of Physics at the Autonomous University of Madrid.

In recent years, there has been global concern about the climate, largely due to the increasing frequency of extreme weather events, as well as the significant increase in temperature.

What is even more worrying is that scientific evidence has pointed to humans as the cause of all of these phenomena that threaten us. This fact, along with the silent way in which it puts our lives in danger, is what has so intensely mobilized people in many different countries, as shown, for example, by the international movement Fridays for Future.

Many movements similar to this were initiated decades ago, when the ozone hole and the greenhouse effect received widespread media coverage.

Yet very few people know that one of the main ingredients of this climate change, the greenhouse effect, was actually discovered by a woman: Eunice Foote.

The Trojan Women’s Seminary (Rensselaer County, NY), where Eunice Foote learned chemistry and biology. Design: Library of Congress The first steps of an amateur scientist

Eunice Foote was born in 1819 in Goshen (Connecticut, USA) in a modest family; his father was a simple farmer. Although she did not go to higher education, her parents wanted their daughter to receive a science education and sent her to Troy Female Seminary. There she was able to learn chemistry and biology, mainly with an experimental approach, for two years.


Ana García Page It is undoubtedly the germ of a facet of her character which will mark all her life: she never lost her curiosity and remained what one would call today an amateur scientist.

In addition, Eunice Foote had a strong character and clear convictions: she believed that women also had the right to be as free as men and to receive a higher education.

This is what led her, along with her husband Elisha Foote, statistician and judge, to sign one of the first global conventions on women’s rights in New York in 1848: the Seneca Falls Convention. Only two years later, she made the biggest (known) discovery of her career: the greenhouse effect.

A house experience

Thus, in 1850, in a laboratory of her own house, she carried out the following experiment: She introduced various gases (ordinary air, hydrogen and CO₂) into closed containers. Inside these containers was also a thermometer to measure the interior temperature.

She then exposed these gases to sunlight and observed the temperature changes. So, she discovered that not all gases heat up in the same way. CO₂ seemed to absorb the most heat.

She also observed that humidity is another crucial factor for heating (the more humid it is, the more heat is absorbed). We know that there is a direct relationship between temperature and the microscopic movement of particles: the higher the temperature of a gas, the more its particles move. Therefore, air molecules are able to absorb the incoming heat by transforming it into molecular motion.

Eunice’s was a fairly straightforward experiment that can easily be done at home. Indeed, figure 1, corresponding to a similar experiment carried out by the authors of this article during this year’s European Researchers’ Night, shows how the temperature measured in containers containing CO₂ increases more than in those containing only l ‘air.


Experimental setup (A) and heating results (B)

Implications of the experiment

Despite their simplicity, the results of their experiment have far-reaching consequences. Eunice quickly realized the implications of her findings, as she knew from her scientific background that the composition of the atmosphere had changed over time. Therefore, the temperature of the atmosphere must also have changed over time. Moreover, if the composition of CO₂ in the atmosphere changed in the future, the climate would also change.

What the researcher did not know was that, in fact, above his head (or under his feet), there was a vivid example of his discovery: Venus.

Venus is not the planet in our solar system closest to the Sun, but it is nonetheless the one with the highest atmospheric temperature. This is due to the dense atmosphere, with terrifying colossal clouds of CO₂ and even sulfuric acid.


Image of clouds in the atmosphere of Venus. ESA / MPS / DLR / IDA

Despite today’s daunting image, it is believed that in the past Venus was quite similar to our peaceful planet: a habitable place. Something terrible happened in its past history that made it become the hell it is today: Venus is nothing more than a warning sign in our sky that tells us how things can be if we are not responsible enough for our actions.

A woman in a man’s world


Article by Eunice Newton Foote, Circumstances Affecting the Heat of the Sun’s Rays, published in the American Journal of Science. Despite this huge discovery, Eunice Foote was not a professional scientist and, even worse, she was a woman in a century where women were not taken seriously.

So it was a colleague of hers, Joseph Henry of the Smithsonian Institution, who presented her research – published under the title Circumstances Affecting the Heat of the Sun’s Rays – to the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in 1856. .


José Ramón Ares Henry was very impressed with his study, which he considered to be of better quality than the others presented at the conference, and decided to add a preface to the research: “Science does not belong to the country nor to the to sex. The sphere of women embraces not only the beautiful and the useful, but also the true.

However, perhaps because it was a woman’s job after all, it was not even published in the conference summary.

Moreover, a year later, John Tyndall, who was a professional scientist and therefore had many more resources to do these experiments, published an article in which he came to the same conclusions as Eunice.

It’s not yet clear if he was aware of Eunice’s research, maybe not, but what is certain is that he did not quote it. The work of the American then fell into oblivion and John Tyndall made history as the first to discover the greenhouse effect.

However, the story itself had a better place in store for Eunice Foote than the memory drawer. In 2010, Eunice’s work was recovered and with it a fact was revealed: it was Eunice, a woman, who was the first person to find her.

The name of Eunice Foote in the 21st century.

More than 10 years have passed since this rediscovery and hardly anyone yet knows that the greenhouse effect was discovered by a woman.

Almost no one knows Eunice Foote. One wonders if it would have been any different if it had been a man. While we cannot know for sure, there have been more than enough cases in the history of science not to suspect at least some gender discrimination in the history of Eunice.

Some of the most shameful examples in our scientific community are the exclusion of the Nobel Prize winner Rosalind Franklin, the first person to discover the double helix structure of DNA, or Jocelyn Bell, the discoverer of these cosmic ocean lighthouses, the pulsars.

With more media impact and more topicality, many voices have also been raised in recent months to point out and protest that no woman has won a Nobel Prize in science this year either.

Despite the fame of these awards, in reality, this clear inequality among recipients is just the tip of an iceberg of exclusion and discrimination that persists in our community.

Perhaps in the shadows she was forced to live under, like many other women we still know nothing about, Eunice was leading the way not only to be better as a species, by being more aware of the consequences of our actions, but also to be better human beings in the present.

The original article can be found here


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Ruth Guzman | Death notice | lacrossetribune.com https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ruth-guzman-death-notice-lacrossetribune-com/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ruth-guzman-death-notice-lacrossetribune-com/ LA CROSSE – Our sister-in-law / mother / aunt / cousin, Ruth Lynne Guzman, lost her courageous battle with cancer on December 23, 2021. Ruth was born in her family home in La Crosse, WI on September 20, 1938, her first cradle being a chest of drawers in his parents’ bedroom. Despite her acute asthma, […]]]>

LA CROSSE – Our sister-in-law / mother / aunt / cousin, Ruth Lynne Guzman, lost her courageous battle with cancer on December 23, 2021. Ruth was born in her family home in La Crosse, WI on September 20, 1938, her first cradle being a chest of drawers in his parents’ bedroom. Despite her acute asthma, she was a cheerful and spirited child, a voracious reader who loved dramatic theater. This loving home was shared with her parents, Vernon and Elvina Swancutt, her brother Brian and her sisters Karen and Susan. The family loved to visit loved ones at the Ettrick, Wisconsin farm.

During her high school years, Ruth worked as a nurse’s aide at Grandview Hospital. So began her long-standing interest in medicine – an interest that developed further as she spent most of her professional life in hospitals.

Ruth graduated from Central High School in 1957 and began attending La Crosse State Teachers College, where she met her first husband Eduardo. He was originally from Colombia, South America, United States to learn English. Their marriage produced three children: Elizabeth and twins Anthony and Deborah. With the twins only three months old, Eduardo and Ruth moved to Barranquilla, Colombia. This move was a real testament to her adventurous nature, in a foreign country whose language she did not know. Here Ruth worked as an English teacher at Colegio Parrish and learned to speak Spanish fluently, developing a keen interest in foreign languages.

Ruth and Eduardo returned to the United States in 1969 and raised their three children in La Crosse. Ruth received a Bachelor of Arts in French and Spanish and a Bachelor of Science in Education from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse in 1971. She worked at UW-L to teach French and Spanish and conduct the foreign language laboratory in the main hall. Ruth proudly told how, during a French study trip to France, she danced on the tables of the Moulin-Rouge!

In 1981, Ruth and Eduardo separated and Ruth moved to Washington DC. There she held various positions at the George Washington University Hospital, then as a Department Supervisor for the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Unit at DC General Hospital.

In DC, Ruth married Servilio Valdez. She and Servilio returned to La Crosse in 2008. Here, Ruth began her career as a Spanish medical interpreter at Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center. Ruth excelled and loved this job, which was a perfect combination of her love of the language and her interest in medicine.

At La Crosse, Ruth devoted herself to her work as a performer and helped care for her ailing father, Vern, and sister Karen. She also looked after her husband Servilio, who developed a neurological disease to which he succumbed, after several years, in 2020. Shortly after his death, Ruth was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

During her illness, Ruth became a resident of Bethany St. Joseph Care Center in La Crosse. Here, her wit, sense of humor, camaraderie, and love of puns quickly made her one of the most popular residents.

She lost her battle right before her favorite holiday, Christmas. Ruth celebrated with her family the magic of this wonderful season as it was done during the Depression – children wake up to the wonder of a transformed house with sparkling decorations and a beautiful Christmas tree with gifts all around. She also made fun birthdays magical. Ruth loved movies, read poetry and all kinds of literature, and was an expert at crosswords and word games. She had a passion for the wonders of nature: flowers and gardening, a rainbow after the summer rain, the stars in the sky, and above all “feeding the bugs”. She enjoyed walking, cycling and rollerblading until her later years. We send him with his usual affectionate good evening: “Que duermas con los ángeles”.

(May you sleep with the angels. “)

Ruth is survived by her sister Susan Bea (widow of William) Schmidt; Brother Brian Edwin (Kathy) Swancutt; children: Elizabeth (Max Bigelow) Guzman, Anthony Blane Guzman, Deborah Wynne (widow of Mike) Guzman-Stoeffler; grandchildren: Carlye Margaret (Tyler) Hart, Brandon Blane Guzman; nieces and nephews: Derek Wayne (Kim) Kaio, Kam-lin (Dominic) Roswall, Dr Mark Alan (Dr Jessica Ricaldi) Swancutt, Dr Diana Marie (Elaine Allen) Swancutt, Laura Lynn (Paul) Wetzel, and many cousins, great-nieces and grand-nephews.

The family would like to thank the staff at Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center and Bethany St. Joseph Care Center, for the exceptional care of our beloved mother / sister / aunt / cousin. She really enjoyed her months at Bethany, and we felt reassured that she was in your safe and loving hands.

The funeral will be at noon on Friday January 7, 2022, at the Faith and Life Chapel of Riverside Transitional Care, 2575 Seventh St. South, La Crosse, followed by lunch and fellowship. Interment after lunch, in the mausoleum of the Catholic cemetery of La Crosse. There will be no visitation until the Friday funeral; however, friends and family are invited to visit from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 6, 2022, at Jandt-Fredrickson Funeral Home, Woodruff Chapel, 4239 Mormon Coulee Road, La Crosse. Online condolences can be offered at www.jandtfredrickson.com.


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Young people are invited to take the chance to be a part of Derry’s About Us 2022 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/young-people-are-invited-to-take-the-chance-to-be-a-part-of-derrys-about-us-2022/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:09:37 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/young-people-are-invited-to-take-the-chance-to-be-a-part-of-derrys-about-us-2022/ The deadline for submissions is Sunday, January 9 at midnight and winners will have their work on display in the live installation in Derry in March 2022, at the start of UNBOXED, – a celebration of creativity in 2022 that will take place in the north and Great Britain. Award-winning poet Stephen Sexton of Derry […]]]>

The deadline for submissions is Sunday, January 9 at midnight and winners will have their work on display in the live installation in Derry in March 2022, at the start of UNBOXED, – a celebration of creativity in 2022 that will take place in the north and Great Britain.

Award-winning poet Stephen Sexton of Derry was recently named to the list of judges for the competition.

The theme of the competition is “connectivity and the universe”, with young people invited to submit either a poem, a scratch animation project, or both. The project is supposed to reflect on “the many ways in which life across the universe is intertwined”.

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It is hoped that the initiative will spark creative inspiration for young people and the About Us microsite is available to help find inspiration with everything from whale songs to astrophysics.

With the theme set in place, the goal of the competition is to enable people to look at the world with fresh eyes and to help others understand the wonders of the world from a new perspective.

The About Us events will be a large outdoor event taking place in five different cities, including Derry. From March to May 2022, About Us will take place for a week in Paisley, Derry, Caernarfon, Luton and Hull and will feature multimedia installations throughout the day and mapping screenings every evening.

The evening performances will transform the buildings and landmarks of each of the five cities into a vast canvas featuring bespoke entertainment, cutting-edge map projection technology set to an all-new score by composer Nitin Sawhney performed by local choirs.

Derry poet Stephen Sexton.

During the day, outdoor facilities will incorporate submissions from the About Us contest and the winners will be announced on February 28, 2022.

Derry will also host another massive facility in 2022 along the banks of the River Foyle. “Our Place in Space” will take people through the solar system in the form of a trail.

The other judges of the free poetry competition are Simon Armitage (poet laureate), Ghislaine Boddington, Ifor ap Glyn (national poet of Wales), Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon, Kathleen Jamie, Keith Jarret and Rachel Riley.

Dr Imafidon said: “STEAM is all about creativity. I am excited to see the creativity of the next generation as they explore what connectivity looks like in our universe and beyond.

Judith Palmer, Director of The Poetry Society, said: “The creativity of young people never fails to amaze us. We can’t wait to see what inspires young people about science, the natural world, and the network of interdependence that connects us all.

Martin Green, Creative Director at UNBOXED, said: “It is fitting that the ideas and inspirations of children and young people shape the opening event of UBOXED through a national competition that brings together poetry writing and technology.

“About Us is an invitation to consider our awe-inspiring universe, a large-scale exploration of the vast networks of connection that take us from the Big Bang to today. I am so excited to see how these epic themes will be enriched and emboldened by the contribution of young people. “

The About Us contest is free and open to youth living in NI between the ages of 4 and 18.

The closing date is Sunday January 9, 2022 23:59 GMT.

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Two “major” events confirmed for Derry in 2022


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Kids Learn STEM Education Can Be Fun Too | News https://chattahoocheetrace.com/kids-learn-stem-education-can-be-fun-too-news/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 00:24:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/kids-learn-stem-education-can-be-fun-too-news/ WATER IN FEAR – There was an event on Monday that opened the eyes of school children in the area to the wonders of space. It also opened their minds to the importance of knowing science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM for short. “There are a lot of future jobs in STEM,” said Mirissa […]]]>

WATER IN FEAR – There was an event on Monday that opened the eyes of school children in the area to the wonders of space.

It also opened their minds to the importance of knowing science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM for short.

“There are a lot of future jobs in STEM,” said Mirissa Scholting, Cass County 4-H extension assistant. “The technology is advancing. We need more people in engineering, more people in math. The earlier they are exposed to it, the more it will spark their interest and allow them to learn more.

The five elementary students, all members of 4-H, took part in an event called “Galactic Quest” at the Cass County Extension Office.

It was run by the University of Nebraska as part of its “boarding schools” around the state over the holidays, featuring UNL students helping young people with various exercises.

The UNL students at Monday’s event were Elaina Madison, Meagan Heimbrecht and Marcus Cureton.

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The event is actually part of a national 4-H initiative in which colleges across the country submit ideas each year for young students to learn.

This year’s topic on space education was submitted by Clemson University, according to Scholting.

“Space is a hot topic right now,” she said.

The first exercise involved children building, then flying, paper planes as an “icebreaker” to warm them up for more complex exercises.

The first was to decode messages from a series of letters.

“It teaches them about cybersecurity and its importance in space,” Scholting said. “Communication must remain precise and nothing is going wrong. “

The next exercise was to build telescopes, with lenses.

Next, the kids watched a video about the ever-increasing use of robots in space.

“The robots helped build the International Space Station,” the announcer said on the video. “Robotics are becoming more and more a part of everyday life.

The kids worked as a team to create a robotic hand that included using water pushed through a long tube to act as hydraulic force to move the claws back and forth.

“If you enjoy problem-solving and working in a team, this is a good choice for you,” Scholting said of STEM education.

It seemed to suit the participating children well.

“It’s awesome,” Emma Bitterman said. “I was already interested in space. “

Alyse Smedlund added: “It’s fun. It helps you a lot to learn more about the stars.


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See the stars: Former Potter County Airport among the best in the world for night sky views [outdoors] | Outside https://chattahoocheetrace.com/see-the-stars-former-potter-county-airport-among-the-best-in-the-world-for-night-sky-views-outdoors-outside/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/see-the-stars-former-potter-county-airport-among-the-best-in-the-world-for-night-sky-views-outdoors-outside/ COUDERSPORT— “In most cases, they’ve seen the moon and a bright star or two and that’s it. They see the Milky Way and go crazy. Former Lancaster County resident Curt Weinhold describes the reaction of many first-time visitors to Cherry Springs State Park in Potter County, one of the best places in the world to […]]]>

COUDERSPORT— “In most cases, they’ve seen the moon and a bright star or two and that’s it. They see the Milky Way and go crazy.

Former Lancaster County resident Curt Weinhold describes the reaction of many first-time visitors to Cherry Springs State Park in Potter County, one of the best places in the world to view the night sky and its glittering inhabitants.

This former Depression-era airplane airstrip has been transformed into one of Pennsylvania’s most unique outdoor attractions, a place where wonder only happens at night and you watch in up, not down.

Cherry Springs is approximately 60 miles north of State College on Route 44, designated by the State Legislature in 2019 as “Highway To The Stars,” thanks to Weinhold’s campaign.

It’s considered the best place in the eastern United States to see a truly dark sky – something only 10% of Americans have experienced. In 2017, Smithsonian magazine ranked it among the top eight places in the world for stargazing, as well as remote locations in Chile, the Canary Islands, New Zealand, Hawaii, Namibia, and Canada. It was the first Gold Tier park of the International Dark-Sky Association.

But it might never have become a black sky mecca for astronomers and astrophotographers without the creative thinking of one of its former park managers.

One fateful weekend in the mid-1990s, Chip Harrison was returning home after visiting his mother and spying on someone with strange equipment camping out in one of the fields.

The man said he was looking for dark skies for his telescope to see otherwise hidden wonders. Intrigued, Harrison again encountered the man, who produced a light pollution map showing a dark spot in north-central Pennsylvania. Cherry Springs was right in the middle.

The park warden, who was looking for a way to get more people to the area, took the stargazing balloon and ran with it.

Recognizing the pricelessness of the unspoiled night, Cherry Springs was named in 2000 by the state’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources as its first (and only) Dark Sky State Park. A number of nightly amenities and public programs – viewing events, guided night sky laser tours, and night sky photography workshops – have been added over the years to secure its place among the best places in the world. visit in the starry sky.

Today, the park attracts 85,000 to 90,000 people per year. On any clear night, all year round, there are likely to be stargazers. In the absence of light pollution from the few cities nestled in valleys to wash away the night sky, the Milky Way, nebulae, constellations, meteors, northern lights, the International Space Station, the Andromeda galaxy and other stellar attractions are visible with telescopes, binoculars and even with the naked eye.

On a clear night – and there are typically 60 to 85 a year here – some 10,000 stars are visible to the naked eye.

Interest and exposure continue to grow. In fact, Weinhold, a photographer who sometimes teaches dark sky photography in the park, worries that too many people are seeing stars. “It’s almost being loved to death,” he says.

But in a growing world where light drowns out the nocturnal sights that were regularly seen by our ancestors, it’s not hard to see why.

“Humanity needs to connect to the night sky to maintain a sense of wonder,” Thom Bemus of the National Public Observatory told an interviewer.

“You come here to learn and you come here to gaze at the sky like you’ve never seen it before,” Brandon Lewis of Woodbridge, Va., Told me before dusk as he set up two high-tech telescopes. , a camera and two laptops that he would use to photograph two different nebulae for two long nights.

“I promise you that when you see it for yourself, you will understand why people are coming back. “

No sooner had the sun set than a white mass, like explosive clouds, rose among the evergreen trees. They weren’t clouds, of course, but stars, gas, and space dust that collectively appear white to our eyes. Think about 400 billion stars.

Even though temperatures had fallen in the 1920s, around 100 people, many of them families, made it to the public night sky viewing area designed from the old unpaved runway. They were seated on portable chairs wrapped in blankets or lying flat on the floor wrapped in sleeping bags. All had their eyes turned to the sky.

I watched the Big Dipper. It was upside down, seeming to pour stars into the night sky. I had never seen the constellation so huge.

The only artificial light came from the occasional glow of a flashlight or red filter lantern. White light is prohibited in the field for obvious reasons – it impairs the average person’s night vision for about 15 minutes. Large mounds of dirt were placed at the far end of the parking lot to prevent vehicle headlights from spoiling the Star Party. Even the toilet bulbs are red.

The starry raves of Cherry Springs sometimes confuse the visiting public.

“Some people think it’s a movie, so to speak,” says Scott Morgan, current park manager. “People have asked us when we are going to turn on the Northern Lights. Another well-known story involves a visitor who showed up at the park office to complain that he had just visited Cherry Springs and that there was no dark sky. It was in the afternoon.

In the old grass track on one side of Route 44, the general public can sit back and watch the stars all night long. Free.

Across the highway is the Night Astronomy Observation Field. This area is used by more serious astronomers with telescopes, and especially astrophotographers who use combinations of cameras, computers, telescopes, and rotating tripods.

It’s serious business on this side of the road. Users pay a fee per night and have access to electricity, Wi-Fi, and haphazardly scattered concrete slabs for their expensive equipment. As night falls, an armored door closes to prevent people from driving and spoiling the exhibits. If you turn on as much as a dome light in your vehicle, prepare to be strewn with outrage.

It’s not uncommon for these high tech folks to doze off in camping chairs during the day and then take care of their gear through the night.

Take John Sojka, who works for the federal government in space intelligence and is a part-time Solar System Ambassador for NASA. For several nights, he and three friends, who call themselves the Astro Bros, took images of deep space with telescopes that use mirrors to take Hubble Space Telescope-quality images of non-visible objects. with the naked eye.

Filters prevent any light other than that of celestial objects from entering, and computer software stacks multiple-exposure images into a single, crisp photo.

Even a visit to Cherry Springs tends to make you think about its existence and its place in the universe.

“I think it proves the existence of God,” says Sojka. “Very often religion and science talk about the same thing.”

Jo-Ann Sun, who had just graduated in neuroscience from the University of Pennsylvania, adds Jo-Ann Sun, “I think I’m a pretty spiritual person and it made me feel more connected with it. humanity as a whole.

“At the very least,” she said, “tonight when you see the sky, it will give you immense appreciation for just being alive.”

The vastness of the space also made Caelan Chapman, 23, of Mechanicsburg, reflect.

“Whenever I look at stars here or at home, it amazes me a bit that what I am looking at has happened so far in the past that the star I am looking at may not even be there anymore. He said. . “There is an incredible sense of scale to everything. We are so small and insignificant.

For her friend Olivia Christopherson, there is solace in the infinity of space. “It’s a different kind of peace, it’s a different form of nature,” she said. “We are all part of it and it is part of us.”

IF YOU ARE GOING TO

Or: Cherry Springs State Park is located at 4639 Cherry Springs Road, Coudersport, Pennsylvania. The park is always open and, with the exception of the night astronomical observation field, admission is free. For more information, dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/FindAPark/CherrySpringsStatePark; 814-435-1037.

Pets or drones are not allowed. You may or may not have cell service.

Accommodation: there is a 30-site primitive campground in the park, open April through October; reservations well in advance are advised. Go online to the park website above or call 1-888-727-2757. Nearby Lyman Run State Park also offers primitive camping. Private rooms are available in nearby lodges, motels, cabins, rental homes and glampgrounds. Go to visitpottertioga.com/stay.

Other nearby attractions: the 262,000 acre Susquehannock State Forest and its 550 miles of trails; the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon, the Pennsylvania Lumber Museum, the 70th Woodsmen Show (August 2022), the 62-mile Pine Creek Rail Trail, and the Eliot Ness Museum and the annual Elliot Ness Fest (July 2022).

Ad Crable is an LNP | LancasterOnline Outdoor Editor.


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Why Marriage Requires Amnesia – The New York Times https://chattahoocheetrace.com/why-marriage-requires-amnesia-the-new-york-times/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 10:00:06 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/why-marriage-requires-amnesia-the-new-york-times/ Marriage is a solution to many problems that creates endless additional problems. Marriage can cure your loneliness or make it worse. Marriage can make you feel a lot stronger than you really are and a lot weaker than you really are. Marriage can feel like a calming meditation retreat, a date, or a very long […]]]>

Marriage is a solution to many problems that creates endless additional problems. Marriage can cure your loneliness or make it worse. Marriage can make you feel a lot stronger than you really are and a lot weaker than you really are. Marriage can feel like a calming meditation retreat, a date, or a very long lunch with the most repetitive human who has ever walked the face of the earth. Each week is a little different from the last.

After my blackout, I tell Bill I’m going to need some time for myself. I can’t keep everyone glued together anymore. Bill apologizes. He says traveling has been stressful. He mentions that we have walked a lot, which is hard on his bad knee. He reminds me of how he broke his tooth on a piece of hard bread in Melbourne, a story he told every person we met because Melbourne.

“I remember,” I reply, wishing I hadn’t.

Marriage requires amnesia, mute button, filter on lens, shock absorber, blinders, bumpers, earplugs, nap. You have to erase these stories, misplace this tape, zoom out, slowly fade to black. I’m starting to spend more time in my head. I start to dream more.

Surviving a marriage requires personal care, time alone, time away, meditation, escape, selfishness. I can’t fault her for being nervousI said to myself as I walked around the island alone, headphones on, bird poo rains down every few yards. I can’t get mad just because he’s an ordinary mortal with flaws. When I blame him I just feel guilty and then I start to blame myself. But I’m just a simple mortal with flaws too.

After several nights on the island, Bill and I start telling the kids to go back to the hotel room after dinner and use their phones for as long as they want. Then we have a drink and watch the ocean without them. We are talking about the breakdown of each child of the day: what did the elder hated today? What decision did the youngest question?

During these discussions, I encourage Bill to be more like me: Give up control. Relax. Let these birds make their noises and they will calm down quickly. When you treat them like they hurt it only gets worse.


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