Science Wonders – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 18:55:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Science Wonders – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Cautiously optimistic summer camping organizers | News, Sports, Jobs https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cautiously-optimistic-summer-camping-organizers-news-sports-jobs/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cautiously-optimistic-summer-camping-organizers-news-sports-jobs/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 17:34:08 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cautiously-optimistic-summer-camping-organizers-news-sports-jobs/ Many local organizations are gearing up for summer camping and outdoor recreational activities for children and youth after a year of absence. The people who run and organize these events say they are cautiously optimistic about their opening this year. “You feel bad. The kids failed last year and with the demands of school you […]]]>


Many local organizations are gearing up for summer camping and outdoor recreational activities for children and youth after a year of absence. The people who run and organize these events say they are cautiously optimistic about their opening this year.

“You feel bad. The kids failed last year and with the demands of school you feel really bad”, David Spencer, executive director of the Sacandaga Bible Conference, said.

The Sacandaga Bible Conference in Broadalbin offers programs for youth of all ages, including summer camping with plenty of outdoor activities ranging from archery, rock climbing, canoeing and kayaking to hiking. ‘Arts and crafts. A recent addition this year is an 11 foot high lower level zipline for kids who may be hesitant to make it to a 30 foot high ropes course.

“Our schedule revolves around the outdoors. It’s fun and adventurous, and parents feel safe placing their children in a program that enriches them with Christian values ​​”, Spencer said.

Spencer said it was a lot of work to put together a camping program, but said the staff felt a surge of enthusiasm.

“We are going to make this as normal as possible for the children” Spencer said.

New guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made recommendations for unvaccinated and vaccinated camp participants about wearing masks outdoors. According to the CDC, camps no longer need to hide out in most circumstances.

The CDC always recommends that summer campers, staff and volunteers who are not fully immunized wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces. Other recommendations include physical distancing, testing, and limiting contact with participants to a fixed amount.

“Parents always ask if their children should wear masks all day. We assure them that the state requires masks inside, but not outside ”, Spencer said. “It’s always exciting to see how the kids grow up at camp. People don’t realize how much they are learning.

According to Spencer, the Sacandaga Bible Conference summer program and activities use the outdoors for most of the day.

There is still space available; visit www.sacandagabibleconference.com for more information and to register.

Churches are preparing for their vacation Bible schools this summer after a one-year hiatus. This includes Mayfield Central Presbyterian Church, Fonda Reformed Church, and Glen Reformed Church.

Fonda Reformed Church will have its VBS the week of July 19-23 with the theme Hero Central; some of the changes brought about by new CDC and state guidelines include holding morning (9 a.m. to 11 a.m.) and evening (6 p.m. to 8 p.m.) sessions to accommodate most children in the family while maintaining security in numbers. Another change is that pre-registration is required when, in other years, the church has allowed last minute visits.

Pastor Bonnie Orth of Mayfield Central Presbyterian Church said their VBS will have individually wrapped snacks during their summer program. Before the kids share a bowl of Cheetos or other snack, she said.

“Holiday Bible School is fun where you learn stories from the Bible and participate in crafts, games and science projects” Orth said. “We remain cautiously optimistic. We used to have about 45 kids, but this year we don’t know what to expect.

Deja Donde is the parent of four children. She said she enrolled her daughter Rhiannon and son Seamus at Mayfield Central Presbyterian Church VBS. Another son, Liam, will volunteer.

“My kids have been 100 percent distant,” she said. “They had little to do with other kids and this will be their first social event in a year.”

Donde said her daughter Rhiannon was hesitant, but delighted to be with other children in a social event for the first time since the pandemic.

“The only thing I hesitate about” Dondé said, “Have the adults been vaccinated, but not the children”.

Donde said she wondered if staff and adult volunteers would maintain social distancing and wear masks around children.

“We are very careful” she said.

To enroll in Vacation Bible School, contact the respective churches directly.

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Cow cheese without cow: this American start-up produces mozzarella without animals https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cow-cheese-without-cow-this-american-start-up-produces-mozzarella-without-animals/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cow-cheese-without-cow-this-american-start-up-produces-mozzarella-without-animals/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 05:26:15 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cow-cheese-without-cow-this-american-start-up-produces-mozzarella-without-animals/ A team of scientists from New Culture, a startup based in San Francisco, is set to modernize the art of cheese making. Scientists aim to launch what they describe as Animal-Free Mozzarella by the end of 2023. Creating a “real cow-free cow’s cheese” involves the process of fermentation to create casein, leading to a piece […]]]>


A team of scientists from New Culture, a startup based in San Francisco, is set to modernize the art of cheese making. Scientists aim to launch what they describe as Animal-Free Mozzarella by the end of 2023. Creating a “real cow-free cow’s cheese” involves the process of fermentation to create casein, leading to a piece of real dairy cheese. The company claims that the history of dairy cheese dates back over 2,000 years, but that it has caused irreparable damage to animals, the planet and even humans.

The company says it’s harnessing the wonders of fermentation and here’s how. He says casein protein is “the hero ingredient” and is the main dairy protein in cow’s milk. In fact, it makes up about 80 percent of the protein content of milk.

On the New Culture website, the company states that its “mozzarella is unlike any other mozzarella you’ve tried, but also remarkably similar. It tastes, has the same texture, melts and stretches as the cheese we all know and love. But it’s also animal-free, lactose-free and respectful of the planet.

He adds, “Casein proteins are the lifeblood of the cheese-making process, as they create the milk curd from which most cheeses are made. Casein also gives dairy cheese its delicious character, especially the famous melting and stretchable mozzarella.

New Culture co-founder Matt Gibson said that while casein protein is very difficult to manufacture using precision fermentation, his team and company have made major breakthroughs over the past 18 years. last months. “We make a line of casein proteins and have completely mastered the art of reconstructing casein micelles with all types of animal-free casein,” he told Food Navigator.

The company adds on its website that during the fermentation process, it harnessed the power of microorganisms to convert one food product into another. “Take the example of the transformation of milk into cheese. Hungry microorganisms digest the proteins and natural sugars in milk, and voila! Cheese was born. We house our microorganisms in fermentation tanks, feed them sugar, and then collect the casein they produce in return. “

The team mixes animal casein protein with a few other ingredients such as water, fat, a touch of sugar, vitamins and minerals to make a really good cheese. The company uses vegetable fats such as coconut oil, sunflower oil and canola oil. Plus, they only use plant-based sugars, such as glucose from corn and maltose from seeds and grains. “We also blend nutrient minerals and vitamins, such as calcium, phosphate, vitamin A and vitamin B,” he says.


It’s an all-TV show this week on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast, as we discuss 8K, screen sizes, QLED panels, and mini-LEDs – and offer some buying advice. Orbital is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, and anywhere you get your podcasts.



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The Henry Ford College team qualifies for the final of the Community College Innovation Challenge | https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-henry-ford-college-team-qualifies-for-the-final-of-the-community-college-innovation-challenge/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-henry-ford-college-team-qualifies-for-the-final-of-the-community-college-innovation-challenge/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 18:53:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-henry-ford-college-team-qualifies-for-the-final-of-the-community-college-innovation-challenge/ A team of students from Henry Ford College will be one of 12 groups that will compete in the final round of the Community College Innovation Challenge (CCIC). The 12 teams were recently announced by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The competition aims to strengthen […]]]>


A team of students from Henry Ford College will be one of 12 groups that will compete in the final round of the Community College Innovation Challenge (CCIC).

The 12 teams were recently announced by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The competition aims to strengthen entrepreneurial thinking among community college students by challenging them to develop STEM-based solutions to real-world problems. It also allows students to discover and demonstrate their ability to use STEM to make a difference in the world and to translate that knowledge into action.

The Henry Ford College team designed a “MaskKito” for the competition. The product is a stylish nano-cleansing mask that has been developed as a COVID-19 prevention mask with the ability to destroy viruses using the combined technology of nano-fiber weaves with UVC radiation.

Teams consist of two to four students and a teacher or mentor administrator from the team. Finalists will participate in a virtual innovation boot camp in June and interact with entrepreneurs and experts in business planning, stakeholder engagement, strategic communication and market dynamics. The Boot Camp concludes with a student innovation showcase with STEM leaders and Congress stakeholders, and a pitch presentation to determine the winning teams for first, second and third place.

“The AACC is pleased to have been able to redesign the CCIC after postponing last year’s competition due to COVID-19,” said Walter G. Bumphus, President and CEO of AACC. “The students who participate in this challenge are innovation leaders, and their use of STEM solutions for the benefit of society is not only very important, but necessary to help ensure a strong future. Our post-pandemic world will need fresh and innovative minds to design creative solutions to help those who need it most, and we are excited to help facilitate the process. “

Among the teams of ideas presented this year are solutions to fight the pandemic, from biodegradable masks to home virus testing; virtual reality applications to provide life skills training to children with autism; and electric vehicle conversion kits.

“It’s truly inspiring to see the incredible creativity and talent of students in community colleges across the country, and I want to congratulate the finalists for their hard work,” said Karen Marrongelle, Deputy Director of the Education Branch. and NSF human resources. “We need to inspire new generations in all communities to explore the wonders of science and engineering, and CCIC is an exciting opportunity for students to start thinking about STEM careers. I look forward to learning more about their projects and the contributions these students will make to America’s STEM future.

The 11 other finalists and their projects are:

Austin Community College, Texas

• OASIS – the Officer Fitness and Stress Information System uses artificial intelligence to help police departments better analyze data from devices such as camera images, GPS systems and heart rate monitors.

Bergen Community College (New Jersey)

• The Electric Vehicle Conversion Project aims to reduce carbon emissions in the transportation industry by developing modular kits to convert gasoline-powered vans to fully electric vehicles.

Manhattan Borough Community College (New York)

• The BMCC student team is developing accessible and affordable virtual reality applications to serve as an interactive learning platform for children with autism to teach them essential life skills.

Columbus State Community College, Ohio

• The Greenago Project: Turning Colleges Green is placing SMART and self-compacting recycling bins on college campuses that reward students for recycling through the use of an app.

Itawamba Community College (Mississippi)

• The Achelous project is developing a filtering mechanism to collect clean water that can be used in rural areas, in emergencies, and to provide water to the homeless.

Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana)

• The Viruscan project aims to combat the spread of a pandemic virus with a new, inexpensive self-administered test that automatically alerts primary care providers.

Johnson County Community College, Kansas

• The Johnson County team is creating a mechanical bench that allows people who use mobility aids such as wheelchairs to move from the driver’s seat to the back of their vehicle without assistance in accessing their device.

Nashua Community College (New Hampshire)

• The EnviroMask project is developing an environmentally friendly, fully biodegradable face mask using cotton with bioplastic and non-woven bamboo fiber.

Pasadena City College (California)

• The Pasadena City College team is exploring the use of conjugated antibody nanoparticles to help identify and treat cancer and infectious diseases.

Tarrant County College, Texas

• The Shroomzzz: Beehive Mushroom Grower Project focuses on improving the health of bee colonies.

Virginia Western Community College (Virginia)

• The Community Coral Project supports coral growth through 3D printing of porous structures made of PLA, a plastic substitute made from fermented vegetable starch.

To receive updates on the Virtual Boot Camp and CCIC 2021 winners, visit www.aaccinnovationchallenge.com.



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The truth is out there. But with the new UFO report set to land soon, discussions of alien life are also increasingly common in science classrooms nationwide. https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-truth-is-out-there-but-with-the-new-ufo-report-set-to-land-soon-discussions-of-alien-life-are-also-increasingly-common-in-science-classrooms-nationwide/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-truth-is-out-there-but-with-the-new-ufo-report-set-to-land-soon-discussions-of-alien-life-are-also-increasingly-common-in-science-classrooms-nationwide/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 21:06:25 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-truth-is-out-there-but-with-the-new-ufo-report-set-to-land-soon-discussions-of-alien-life-are-also-increasingly-common-in-science-classrooms-nationwide/ Get essential education information and commentary delivered straight to your inbox. register here for the daily 74’s newsletter. reavid Black once saw a UFO. At least that’s how he catches the attention of his students before revealing that it was just a sundog – a bright light caused when the sun’s rays refract through the […]]]>


Get essential education information and commentary delivered straight to your inbox. register here for the daily 74’s newsletter.

reavid Black once saw a UFO.

At least that’s how he catches the attention of his students before revealing that it was just a sundog – a bright light caused when the sun’s rays refract through the ice crystals in the atmosphere.

He will spend the summer researching more famous accounts of UFO sightings and alleged alien abductions with students. And with the federal government’s report on “unidentified aerial phenomena” – or PAN – expected as early as this week, they will have new grainy videos to analyze and debate.

“If you have a hot topic that comes up, as a teacher you want to fit it in,” said Black, who teaches science at New Haven School, a private girls’ boarding school in Saratoga Springs, in. Utah.

When former President Donald Trump signed a $ 2.3 trillion fundraising bill in December, educators were looking at the $ 54 billion in relief funds included for the reopening of schools. But within the 5,500+ pages of legislation was a provision sponsored by Senator Marco Rubio directing naval intelligence to discover what they were tracking in the sky. The bill called for detailed reports on NAPs and whether “a potential adversary could have achieved revolutionary aerospace capabilities” that could harm Earth, or at least the United States. new material for teachers who find questions about extraterrestrial visitors a great way to engage students in science.

Highly trained military pilots admit they take sightings of these unusual planes seriously – and believe others should too. With Republicans and Democrats interested in the report’s findings and news broadcasts respected as “60 minutes” depending on the topic, the possibility of otherworldly beings patrolling our atmosphere is no longer just the case. science fiction movies and paranormal conventions.

The report’s upcoming release is perfectly timed for the alien intelligence research unit that Black teaches every summer. It hooks students up with stories of close encounters and uses hands-on projects and 3D models to explore the math and physics involved in the journey of aliens for tens of thousands of years to reach Earth.

His students learn the Drake Equation, a formula for the probability of finding intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. They read reports of alleged sightings – like that of Travis Walton, a lumberjack whose 1975 account of alien abduction was featured in the 1993 film “Fire in the Sky.” Then they present the skeptics’ point of view, offer their own opinions and lead a discussion with their fellow students.

Related

How Neil deGrasse Tyson showed me the wonders of the universe, inspired my career and got me through the pandemic

“Studying these things for decades”

UFO conspiracy theories teach students to be open-minded, “but also to have a skeptical filter,” said Jeff Adkins, professor of astronomy at Deer Valley High School in Antioch, Calif., Near ‘Oakland.

Acton, Calif. Astronomy professor Jeff Adkins uses an illustration showing the scale of the universe when he discusses with his students the possibility that aliens have reached Earth. (Jeff Adkins)

He asks students to consider the size of the universe when deciding whether alien life forms would bother performing experiments on humans or jamming the military’s radar systems.

“I still have a childhood fascination with aliens, but now I know there has to be… strong evidence to support aliens before I truly believe they are real,” said Dennis Gavrilenko, a senior of Adkins’ Astronomy and Space Exploration course this year. “I find it unlikely that aliens have traveled thousands of light years to get to Earth just to fly super fast and not make themselves known.”

Deer Valley High senior Dennis Gavrilenko said he had a “childhood fascination” with UFOs and aliens, but said he was waiting for solid evidence. (Courtesy of Dennis Gavrilenko)

But physics professor Kevin Knuth of Albany University in New York City believes there is something – or someone – watching us from above. He is one of the UFO researchers who shared their expertise with high school students.

His suspicions that UFOs are more than a hoax began while he was a student at Montana State University. In 1988, two cows from a nearby herd were mutilated with surgical precision, and a professor mentioned that UFOs often interfered with nuclear missile systems at Malmstrom Air Base three hours away.

Years later, UFO researcher Robert Hastings held a press conference with Air Force officers talking about the same events in Malmstrom. That’s when Knuth became convinced, and he thinks the report to Congress will only tell part of the story.

“We now know that the government has been studying these things for decades and not telling anyone about them,” Knuth said.

An article co-authored by Knuth in 2019 focuses on well-documented sightings of “unidentified aerial vehicles” that display “technical capabilities far exceeding that of our fastest planes and spacecraft.”

Knuth’s speed and acceleration calculations are also good physics issues in high school, said Berkil Alexander, who teaches at Kennesaw Mountain High School near Atlanta. His fascination with UFOs began when he saw “Flight of the Navigator,” a 1986 film about an alien abduction, and in 2019 he was chosen to participate in a NASA program focused on increasing student engagement in STEM.

Berkil Alexander gives a rocket lesson at Kennesaw Mountain High School in Georgia. (Kensaw Mountain High School)

During the last days of each school year, he organizes an “ET Exoplanets Symposium” in which teams of students, assuming the roles of astronomer, astrobiologist, historian and Pentagon investigator, compete to argue for the evidence I’ve collected.

Alexander believes the truth has been hidden for decades because it could cause panic. But now he thinks “people are pretty well prepared to handle anything. “

“Don’t take sides”

Teachers who tackle UFOs might find a place for the subject when they introduce students to the solar system in elementary school – think of colorful styrofoam balls hanging from wire hangers. Space science is getting even more attention in college.

At Coles Elementary schools in Prince William County, Virginia, aliens showed up at an after-school “cryptozoology club” in which students studied crop circles and interviewed a Roswell UFO researcher, New Mexico – the site of the alleged UFO crash in 1947.

The Welcome to Roswell sign welcomes visitors to the outskirts of Roswell, New Mexico. (Bill Clark / CQ-Roll Call, Inc / Getty Images)

How to report a UFO sighting and whether there are alien babies are among the questions students asked experts, said Tara Hamner, one of three teachers who started the program four years ago. Like the other cryptids they study, including Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster, she believes the club is one of a kind and a fun way for students to learn how to collect evidence, assess sources in online and interact with scientists.

The group has not met this year due to the pandemic, but Hamner said she was sure the government’s report would prompt further questions from students in the fall. “We love when we have current news to use our inquiry-based learning to investigate,” she said.

In high school, stand-alone astronomy lessons are not common and are usually offered as electives. Those who teach the subject may have a personal interest, but didn’t study it in college – like Alec Johnson, who requested a day off in 2017 to watch the solar eclipse but ended up transforming the expedition. in a school trip with 150 students and 20 adults.

Georgia Professor Alec Johnson in Gun Hall 4 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida before SpaceX commercial teams started using it for launches. (Courtesy of Alex Johnson)

Subsequently, his students at Morgan County High School in central Georgia requested a separate astronomy class. The possibility of extraterrestrial life is the topic they are most passionate about, perhaps because of the stereotype that UFO sightings are more common in rural areas like theirs.

“The kids are getting on with it, especially if you don’t take sides,” Johnson said, adding that he was eagerly awaiting the government’s report including unseen footage and photos to share with his students. “It makes the History Channel and the teachers happy. “

Bennett Evans, a senior who took Johnson’s astronomy course this year, said his teacher’s enthusiasm for the subject rubbed off on the students.

“His class made me more aware of science in general,” Evans said, recalling an image Johnson uses to make students wonder if aliens exist. “If you take a glass of ocean water, we know there are whales in the ocean, but we can’t tell from that glass. It’s like our universe.

Georgia Science Standards require students to investigate whether there are other “habitable” areas and planets besides Earth. But Johnson goes all out, enhancing his lessons with the musical theme and classroom setting of “The X-Files”.

“Any self-respecting astronomy professor should have a Fox Mulder poster on the wall,” he said.

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TV Tonight: Brian Cox investigates the universe’s biggest questions | TV and radio https://chattahoocheetrace.com/tv-tonight-brian-cox-investigates-the-universes-biggest-questions-tv-and-radio/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/tv-tonight-brian-cox-investigates-the-universes-biggest-questions-tv-and-radio/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/tv-tonight-brian-cox-investigates-the-universes-biggest-questions-tv-and-radio/ Brian Cox’s adventures in space and time 9 p.m., BBC Two Everyone’s favorite soft-spoken physicist returns for this series, looking back on their decade of science documentaries and putting together some of their most mind-boggling footage to try and answer fundamental questions like the existence of aliens, what is it all about. gravity and if […]]]>


Brian Cox’s adventures in space and time

9 p.m., BBC Two

Everyone’s favorite soft-spoken physicist returns for this series, looking back on their decade of science documentaries and putting together some of their most mind-boggling footage to try and answer fundamental questions like the existence of aliens, what is it all about. gravity and if we ever will be. capable of living in space. Presenting from the Royal Institution in London, Cox draws on material from hit BBC shows such as Wonders of the Universe, Forces of Nature and The Planets. Ammar Kalia

Asia: our wild adventures

8 p.m., BBC Two

Natural history presenters dig through archives for memories of Indonesia and Mongolia. Steve Backshall remembers being chased by Komodo dragons, while George McGavin looks back on a school of Sumatran orangutans. In addition, Gordon Buchanan on the Kazakhs using golden eagles for hunting. Jack Seale

Call the midwife: special delivery

9 p.m., BBC One

Miranda Hart in Call The Midwife. Photograph: BBC / PA

With the series finale tonight at 8 p.m., this special documentary looks back on 10 years of BBC drama. There is a dark trawl through the show’s historical stories, including thalidomide births and FGM, as actors like Jessica Raine and Miranda Hart speak about their time on the show. AK

SAS: who dares wins

9 p.m., channel 4

Our remaining recruits are paired up for this week’s set of challenges, all of which revolve around the theme of chemical warfare. First, the pairs must operate while exposed to CS gas, and then they must perform an extraction in ice water, without those that cannot function effectively as a team being removed. AK

Cruise with Jane McDonald

9 p.m., Canal 5

This is the last episode in the McDonald’s miniseries and it continues on the nearby waterways, ascending the Thames with friends to celebrate its 70th birthday. They have lunch at the Michelin-starred Waterside Inn in Bray, before guide Sarah Jane shows the group the Cliveden Estate. AK

Inside KFC: Fast Food Secrets

10 p.m., channel 4

Another dive into the world of the fast food giant, as the test team jumps on the literal gravy bandwagon, approving a new burger full of stuff and a questionable “ Gravynaise. ” Meanwhile, the chain’s store in Gatwick is suffering as Covid turns the airport into a ghost town. Hannah j davies

Choice of film

Coco.
Coco. Photography: Allstar / Pixar / Disney

Coco, 3 p.m., BBC One

Pixar expands its cultural horizons with this glorious and poignant fantasy animation, taking the Mexican Day of the Dead festival as the starting point for a boy to discover his family’s past. Young Miguel believes he can learn the truth about his wandering father through a journey through the fantastical and slightly trippy Land of the Dead. Simon wardell

Live sport

Tennis: Roland-Garros 9:30 am, ITV4. Coverage of the opening day of the French Grand Slam.

Rugby Union: Exeter Chiefs v Newcastle Falcons 1 p.m., BT Sport 1. Sandy Park Premiership match.

French football: Lyon Femmes v Paris Saint-Germain Femmes 8pm, BT Sport 1. Clash of Division 1.



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Devil’s Lake State Park Offers Stunning Views, Geological History Lesson | Science and environment https://chattahoocheetrace.com/devils-lake-state-park-offers-stunning-views-geological-history-lesson-science-and-environment/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/devils-lake-state-park-offers-stunning-views-geological-history-lesson-science-and-environment/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 11:35:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/devils-lake-state-park-offers-stunning-views-geological-history-lesson-science-and-environment/ Camping at Devil’s Lake For those looking for a longer stay in Devil’s Lake, the park offers three regular campgrounds with a total of 423 sites and nine group campsites that can accommodate a total of 240 campers. All can be booked at wisconsin.goingtocamp.com or by calling 888-947-2757. The quartzite campground, a former golf course, […]]]>


Camping at Devil’s Lake

For those looking for a longer stay in Devil’s Lake, the park offers three regular campgrounds with a total of 423 sites and nine group campsites that can accommodate a total of 240 campers. All can be booked at wisconsin.goingtocamp.com or by calling 888-947-2757.

The quartzite campground, a former golf course, is mostly open and grassy, ​​and home to many of the larger RVs. Northern Lights Campground has a similar layout, but is only half a mile from the lake and has two sites for the disabled. It is also the oldest campground in the park and opened in 1939 with help from the Civilian Conservation Corps, which constructed three of the four bathroom and shower buildings.

Ice Age Campground, about a mile from the lake, has only non-electric campsites, is partly wooded and partly open and grassy, ​​has a concession operated camping store and three sites available for disabled people.

There are also concession buildings on the north and south shores of the lake that sell food and groceries, basic camping items, ice, firewood, souvenirs, shirts and hats. Both buildings rent out rowing boats, pedal boats, kayaks and canoes during the summer.

The Devil’s Lake Nature Center, currently closed due to the pandemic, is home to exhibits of Wisconsin reptiles and amphibians, but a new, larger facility is under discussion. During the summer, nature programs are scheduled every day of the week. Themes include snakes, rocks, spiders, and bats. The area at the bottom of the Nature Center is home to historical photographs dating from the late 1800s through the 20th century.



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The American hits her goals in a New Plymouth garden https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-american-hits-her-goals-in-a-new-plymouth-garden/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-american-hits-her-goals-in-a-new-plymouth-garden/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-american-hits-her-goals-in-a-new-plymouth-garden/ It’s a story about a lawyer and an athlete, a fighter and a backyard gardener – and their common ground of resilience, persistence, and startup. The six-year-old avocado tree was given to Brittany Ryan by friends in Ōpunake, who found the seed germinating in their compost. He spent a few years shooting a pot, until […]]]>


It’s a story about a lawyer and an athlete, a fighter and a backyard gardener – and their common ground of resilience, persistence, and startup.

The six-year-old avocado tree was given to Brittany Ryan by friends in Ōpunake, who found the seed germinating in their compost.

He spent a few years shooting a pot, until Brittany and her partner Jamie Rogers moved to a “well-built and well-positioned” house in Marfell, New Plymouth.

The soft-spoken American, with a remarkable history, transplanted the avocado from the pot to the earth at the Marfell Muse estate.

READ MORE:
* Big hit Taranaki Garden Festival brings in $ 4.2 million in GDP for region – report
* Visitors flock to the last weekend of the Taranaki Garden Festival
* Nadia Lim gives fans a glimpse of her semi-underground greenhouse

This will be one of 35 properties open for the Taranaki Sustainable Backyards Trail in the spring. It takes place alongside the Taranaki Garden Festival and the Taranaki Arts Trail, from October 29 to November 7.

In the ground, the avocado became seriously ill.

A lot of people would have kicked the tree in contact, but Brittany refused to give up. “I fed him, removed what was dead and got rid of the disease. He ended up in the form of a cross, ”said the 32-year-old.

“I continued to take care of it, and then it started to grow really, really fast.”

Last year the tree produced 10 avocados, and this year again supplies the family with the potassium-rich fruit.

A lawyer who thrives on a tree that almost didn't succeed.

SIMON O’CONNOR / stuff

A lawyer who thrives on a tree that almost didn’t succeed.

“It’s like going to the lottery after going through so much trauma – it’s nature’s persistence,” says Sustainable Taranaki’s communications manager and mother of 5-year-old Zeke and 2-year-old Aria.

Like this tree, Brittany knows everything to succeed against all odds.

In 2006, her final year at Easton Area High School, Pa., Brittany quit soccer to become the only female on the school’s soccer team. In New Zealand jargon, it’s gridiron.

The kicker place for the Easton Rovers then went to Lebanon Valley College, a liberal arts college in Annville, Pa., And was once again the only woman to play for the Flying Dutchmen.

She played for the college team for four years, while earning a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and a lot of attention. It was not all positive.

“I was told to sit on the side with my pom poms on,” she says, admitting she’s received a lot of criticism over the years.

On the flip side, her high school team was filmed by ESPN, and Brittany’s story has been featured twice in the New York Times, Sports Illustrated (not in a bikini), and numerous sports and soccer websites.

Whenever she’s been interviewed, the exceptional athlete has hijacked her success by saying it’s all about the team. On her right wrist is a fitting tattoo combining the word “humble” with the image of a pie.

In 2010, Brittany became the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s all-time top scorer among kickers with 100 points. She still holds this record.

Fast forward to 2021, and life in Brittany is a world away from the “white suburbs” of its upbringing.

Ryan repairs an arch on the rainwater tank after it has fallen in a strong wind.

SIMON O’CONNOR / stuff

Ryan repairs an arch on the rainwater tank after it has fallen in a strong wind.

These days, she organizes demonstrations of worm farms, plants near the moon and follows the seasons with her hands in the earth and her close family.

Above the rear fence is the Marfell Community Garden, a sustainable Taranaki project led by Urs Signer.

She came to be here and now because of study and love.

As part of her business degree, Brittany came to New Zealand to study at the University of Waikato, landed a job at the International Volunteer Headquarters, met a Kiwi surfer in 2014, and stayed.

Wandering around the family’s 700 square meter backyard just days after Taranaki was hit by high winds, she lifts and moves fallen structures.

“It’s a good time to be in the garden but not to show off the garden,” she says.

June is her favorite month to work in the four-year-old garden. “You get into a routine of what needs to be done – composting and moving things.”

She learned a lot about sustainable gardening by doing an on-site education level 3 horticultural certificate in Taranaki.

When they bought the property in December 2015, the first thing she did was mark off the almost bare backyard – there was only a small greenhouse and a peach tree, now twice the size. “I drew up plans for the garden and it looks like nothing I had planned.”

She always imagines what can be and tries to figure out how to add a children’s water feature and irrigation.

It’s a busy backyard, especially with the family dog ​​ripping apart.

Spud, a one-year-old pug-griffon cross, which they call a “puffon”, skids around the paths, under an arch that will be covered with hops, grapes and chokos, between flourishing native plants, in front of a vine of creeping passion fruit Brittany has just cut, around a flourishing pineapple sage, other herbs, flowers and fruit trees.

These giant pumpkins, which grew wild in the garden, remind Brittany of Halloween and its American roots.

SIMON O’CONNOR / stuff

These giant pumpkins, which grew wild in the garden, remind Brittany of Halloween and its American roots.

But he is not allowed in the vegetable and raspberry garden, kept safe in an enclosure built by Jamie, a roofer.

“I need his help a bit,” Brittany says. “He’s my foundation guy – I’m just the gardener.”

Jamie comes home to grab something and gets pinned for a few words and a photo. He says his role in the garden is to “Keep her happy.”

Although he prefers a lawn that children can play on, he likes home garden vegetables, such as lettuce and silver beets. “Avocado is cool.”

He is also the builder of all structures. “These are all leftovers. Everything was free. It’s what I do for a living, ”he says. “I do my own flashings.”

Then he was gone like lightning.

Under the house, he built a sitting area around a portable fireplace, which the family sits down for several nights. The resulting pot ash is added to the garden.

“Everything is reused,” Brittany says. “I show him a picture and he takes it.”

The main greenhouse, built by Jamie, houses an axolotl, new ponga slings, and will soon be filled with many more.

SIMON O’CONNOR / stuff

The main greenhouse, built by Jamie, houses an axolotl, new ponga slings, and will soon be filled with many more.

Jamie installed an outdoor bench to repot plants, made a cold sash, which looks like a mini greenhouse fashioned from old windows, and built a greenhouse using a collection of found windows, including beautiful leaded lights.

Today the greenhouse houses fresh ponga fronds and a black tank where an axolotl lives. Brittany swirls her hand half-heartedly in the water to see if she can find the amphibian, also known as the Mexican walking fish, but gives up admitting that she lets Zeke pick it up.

Brittany is also disgusted by worms. “I had a sickening phobia of it. I still do, but I just enjoy them more – I overcame it with love. This is what I try to teach when I farm worms. A lot of people don’t have a lot of love for worms.

His own garden has worm farms, a rainwater tank, and composting systems, including Japanese-style Bokashi, an anaerobic process.

She buried Bokashi’s compost near the avocado, so wonders if that’s one of the reasons he thrived.

But for the woman of the Bahá’í Faith, it could be something else. “The avocado tree is a real focus for me… whereas if it was in bloom, it was God’s gift – love at its best.”

– This story is published as part of a partnership between the Taranaki Daily News and the Taft Arts Festival Charity Fund.



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Amazon and Science Center Singapore Launch Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge to Enable STEM Exploration Among Singapore Youth | Taiwan News https://chattahoocheetrace.com/amazon-and-science-center-singapore-launch-amazon-cyber-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8brobotics-challenge-to-enable-stem-exploration-among-singapore-youth-taiwan-news/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/amazon-and-science-center-singapore-launch-amazon-cyber-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8brobotics-challenge-to-enable-stem-exploration-among-singapore-youth-taiwan-news/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 02:15:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/amazon-and-science-center-singapore-launch-amazon-cyber-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8brobotics-challenge-to-enable-stem-exploration-among-singapore-youth-taiwan-news/ As part of the Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge, Amazon and Science Center Singapore are hosting a series of free immersive robotics-themed workshops for elementary and secondary school students ahead of the National Robotics Competition. SINGAPORE – Media OutReach – May 28, 2021 – (NASDAQ: AMZN) – To spark interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics […]]]>


As part of the Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge, Amazon and Science Center Singapore are hosting a series of free immersive robotics-themed workshops for elementary and secondary school students ahead of the National Robotics Competition.

SINGAPORE – Media OutReach – May 28, 2021 – (NASDAQ: AMZN) – To spark interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) from an early age, Amazon Singapore is collaborating with Science Center Singapore to welcome the Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge from now until August 31, 2021. Open to all primary and secondary school students in Singapore, the Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge is a free virtual learning experience designed to develop children’s creativity, skills in problem solving and spark interest in STEM through immersive robotic activities and games.

Introductory Integration Program: Onsite Primary School Workshop at Science Center Singapore

The Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge will equip students with the tools and skills to learn and practice the basics of computing and coding before the National robotics competition (CNRC) scheduled for September. The NRC is an annual competition organized by Science Center Singapore which has been in existence for 22 years.

The challenge includes the Introductory Integration Program and the CoderZ Coding Challenge (online competition). The introductory integration program is open to primary (9 to 12 years old) and secondary (13 to 16 years old) students. Through the challenge, interested students can attend integration workshops virtually hosted by Science Center Singapore. One of the tasks that participants will have to do is code an Amazon Hercules robot, to deliver a friend’s birthday gift within a specified time frame. As they digitally navigate Amazon’s fulfillment center during the robotics game, they will learn how Amazon uses IT on a daily basis to process customer orders and see how coding is applied in real life.

Students wishing to participate in the integration workshop can register here, no previous experience is required: https://www.science.edu.sg/whats-on/workshops-activities/amazon-cyber- robotics-challenge

“STEM education has been a priority at Amazon and as part of our community efforts, we are constantly looking for ways to empower individuals, especially children, to develop their interest and develop their skills in science and technology. . Coding is the language of the future and learning it early will give students a head start to explore their passions. As such, we are excited to expand our collaboration with Science Center Singapore to make the skills STEM more readily available to students across the country, including children from under-represented communities, “mentioned Henry Low, Country Director, Amazon Singapore.

Associate Professor Lim Tit Meng, Managing Director, Science Center Council, said: “Today’s young minds are the mind giants of tomorrow, and our ambition at Science Center Singapore has always been to empower learners to realize their full potential. By deepening our collaboration with Amazon Singapore to welcome the Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge, we are honored to nurture their curiosity, to nurture their spirit of adventure and exploration, and to stimulate their interest in STEM. Now experimenting with tools and robotics will go a long way in helping them. to build a future full of possibilities, inspiration and innovation for themselves. “

Joanna Tan, Executive Director, Children’s Wishing Well, said: “Children’s Wishing Well is very grateful that our beneficiaries have had this opportunity to experience the world of robotics.”

Amazon’s collaboration with Science Center Singapore for the Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge builds on their 2020 STEM pilot program giving elementary and secondary school students free access to online courses to complement home learning in the midst of COVID-19.

Annex: How to participate in the Amazon Cyber ​​Robotics Challenge

About Amazon

Amazon is guided by four principles: customer obsession rather than focus on the competition, passion for invention, commitment to operational excellence, and long-term thinking. Amazon strives to be the most customer-centric company, the best employer on the planet, and the safest place to work in the world. Customer Reviews, One-Click Shopping, Personalized Recommendations, Prime, Fulfillment by Amazon, AWS, Kindle, and The Climate Pledge are some of the things Amazon started. For more information, visit Amazon.sg.

About Science Center Singapore

Science Center Singapore, a leading non-formal educational institution and regional science center, with its cluster of attractions, brings out the wonders of science, technology, engineering and mathematics through its blend unique of exhibitions, educational programs and events. Guardian of creativity and innovation, Science Center Singapore has captured the evolution of scientific developments for nearly four decades.

The Center and its partners have played a central role in transforming the way students and the public interact and learn science, technology, engineering and math. Since 1977, the Center has welcomed more than 30 million visitors and inspired them with more than 1,000 exhibitions spread across 14 exhibition galleries and outdoor exhibition spaces.

The Centre’s group of attractions include the Omni-Theater, Snow City and KidsSTOP ™. The Omni-Theater is an immersive dual-tech educational destination featuring Southeast Asia’s largest transparent dome screen and the world’s newest and brightest 8k digital dome system. Snow City is Singapore’s only permanent indoor snow center offering an arctic-inspired experience in Singapore’s first ice gallery and snow chamber. KidsSTOP ™ – Where Every Child Can Imagine, Experiment, Discover and Dream – is Singapore’s first science center for children offering a rewarding experience through targeted games for children aged 18 months to 8 years. For more information, please visit www.science.edu.sg.

#Amazon #ScienceCentreSingapore



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AI learns to create itself https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ai-learns-to-create-itself/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ai-learns-to-create-itself/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 09:07:57 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ai-learns-to-create-itself/ But there is another crucial observation here. Intelligence has never been an end point for evolution, something to aim for. Instead, it emerged in many different forms, countless tiny solutions to challenges that enabled living things to survive and meet future challenges. Intelligence is the current culmination of a continuous and open process. In this […]]]>


But there is another crucial observation here. Intelligence has never been an end point for evolution, something to aim for. Instead, it emerged in many different forms, countless tiny solutions to challenges that enabled living things to survive and meet future challenges. Intelligence is the current culmination of a continuous and open process. In this sense, evolution is quite different from algorithms from the way people generally view them – as means to an end.

It’s this openness, seen in the seemingly aimless streak of POET-generated challenges, that Clune and others believe could lead to new types of AI. For decades, AI researchers have tried to create algorithms to mimic human intelligence, but the real breakthrough may come from building algorithms that attempt to mimic evolution’s open problem solving – and sit down to watch what emerges.

Researchers are already using machine learning on itself and training it to find solutions to some of the most difficult problems in the field, such as making machines capable of learning more than one task at a time or face situations they have never encountered before. Some now believe that taking this approach and following it might be the best path to general artificial intelligence. “We could start an algorithm that initially doesn’t have a lot of intelligence, and watch it build up to potentially AGI,” says Clune.

The truth is that for now, AGI remains a fantasy. But that’s largely because no one knows how to get there. Advances in AI are piecemeal and made by humans, with advancements typically involving adjustments to existing techniques or algorithms, resulting in incremental leaps in performance or accuracy. Clune characterizes these efforts as attempts to uncover the building blocks of artificial intelligence without knowing what you’re looking for or how many blocks you’ll need. And that’s just the beginning. “At some point we have to take on the Herculean task of bringing them together,” he says.

Asking AI to find and put these building blocks together for us is a paradigm shift. This means that we want to make a smart machine, but we don’t care what it might look like – just give us what works.

Even if AGI is never achieved, the self-learning approach can still change the types of AI created. The world needs more than a very good Go player, says Clune. For him, creating a supersmart machine means building a system that invents its own challenges, solves them, and then invents new ones. POET is a little glimpse of this in action. Clune imagines a machine that teaches a bot to walk, then play hopscotch, then maybe play Go. “So maybe he learns math puzzles and starts inventing his own challenges,” says -he. “The system is constantly innovating, and the sky is the limit in terms of destination.”



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Ticks expected to rise in northern Illinois this season https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ticks-expected-to-rise-in-northern-illinois-this-season/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ticks-expected-to-rise-in-northern-illinois-this-season/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 15:47:20 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ticks-expected-to-rise-in-northern-illinois-this-season/ The summer bastards will roam the wilderness like a tiny army this year. I’m talking about ticks and you can blame the mild winter for that. These skin pains are most active in April, May and June and can carry more than just Lyme disease. Some of the diseases ticks can transmit sound like something […]]]>


The summer bastards will roam the wilderness like a tiny army this year. I’m talking about ticks and you can blame the mild winter for that. These skin pains are most active in April, May and June and can carry more than just Lyme disease.

Some of the diseases ticks can transmit sound like something straight out of a science fiction movie. Discover part of an article shared by MyStateline.

Others listed by the CDC include babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, southern tick-associated rash, tick-borne relapsing fever, and tularemia.

Babesiosis? Purple fever? Tularemia? I am not looking for any of these symptoms. I will leave that and save myself from nightmares and unnecessary anxiety.

The article goes on to explain a few ways to repel these demonic little monsters, including using bug spray with DEET and wearing light-colored clothing (making them easy to spot.)

5 natural ways to keep ticks away

Farmers Almanac listed a few other ways to prevent ticks, which you can already do regularly.

Just combine 4 ounces of purified or distilled water in a small spray bottle with 20 drops of eucalyptus essential oil. Shake before use and spray on skin, cuffs of pants and shoes.

It is also safe for dogs, but should be diluted with water before applying it to your pet.

  • Certain aromatherapy essential oils

Ticks hate the smell of lemon, orange, cinnamon, lavender, peppermint, and pink geranium in order to avoid clinging to anything that smells of these items.

There is also a note to ensure that the oil is 100% organic.

2 cups of water

4 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar

2 tablespoons of organic neem oil

Not only can it be applied to skin and clothing, but also to garden furniture.

  • DIY anti-ticks and insect repellent

9 drops of lemongrass essential oil
6 drops of tea tree essential oil
6 drops of essential oils of peppermint
1 tablespoon of almond oil or jojoba oil

This concoction is intended only for exposed skin. If you’re not feeling that ambitious, the next option might be perfect for you.

Garlic makes the body excrete a scent that tickles hatred.

Eating garlic regularly can give you bad breath, but it will serve you well in the tick battlefield.

You can read some other warning tips and reminders here.

KEEP READING: Here Are 6 Foods In Your Kitchen That Could Harm Your Dog

KEEP READING: 50 Activities to Keep Kids Busy This Summer



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