Science Wonders – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 07:29:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Science Wonders – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Thai Cave Rescue season 1, episode 2 recap https://chattahoocheetrace.com/thai-cave-rescue-season-1-episode-2-recap/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 07:01:57 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/thai-cave-rescue-season-1-episode-2-recap/ Summary As the parents wonder if the rain is due to science or faith, the episode improves on the previous one. Although it’s way too long and makes you think the miniseries would have been better as a movie, it’s more enjoyable. This recap of the Netflix series Thai Cave Rescue season 1, episode 2, […]]]>

Summary

As the parents wonder if the rain is due to science or faith, the episode improves on the previous one. Although it’s way too long and makes you think the miniseries would have been better as a movie, it’s more enjoyable.

This recap of the Netflix series Thai Cave Rescue season 1, episode 2, “To Not Offend The Gods”, contains spoilers

READ: Everything we know about the series.

The pilot episode might not have been that exciting, but the ending hinted that there was some magic to the show. Will this magic continue in the second episode? Read the recap below to find out.

Thai Cave Rescue season 1, episode 2 recap

It has now been 15 hours since they entered the cave and the water level has risen considerably. Eak decides he will swim to the other side. In doing so, he will connect a rope to his body so that the soccer team can also get to the other side. When he does, however, he finds himself in a predicament and begins to drown. Since Eak has been in the water for too long, the soccer team pulls him out and saves his life.

With their path to freedom seemingly no longer an option, the football team asks if they are trapped there. Meanwhile, on land, the citizens begin trying to come up with a plan to save the trapped boys. Governor Narongsak witnesses the scene, and he is soon bombarded with questions from the press. When he visits the parents of the trapped boys, he tells them that he will stay with them until their boys are safe. However, one of the parents says that a villager said that the children have offended the cave spirits and they must ask for their forgiveness. While the Governor believes in science more than faith, he always joins them in prayer.

Mark’s mother learns of the existence of the cave and wonders if her son is among those trapped. But his efforts to get information are shattered when the guard pays him little attention. The Governor talks to a local expert from Tham Luang. He learns that Tham Luang is a monster. Soon after, the rescue mission begins.

Meanwhile, in the caves, the boys begin to panic. Phong shouts that they are standing in the grave, with others claiming that it will be impossible for anyone to find them. Eak tries to use his past experience as a monk to calm the football team down. He offers them to meditate to calm all their nerves. And that seems to be working really well for Adul, who was, understandably, an emotional mess before. Meanwhile, Mark’s mother, Namhom, is fired, once again, by the cave guards. She cries out for the governor and begs him to help her, where she learns that her son hasn’t come to practice. In return, Namhom reveals that she has no Thai papers and asks why she would risk all that.

The end

The governor believes Namhom and he gives him permission to stay. Inside the cave, Eak says they might be able to escape if they start digging. But there aren’t exactly a huge number of volunteers to help out. In fact, it’s only Mark who’s willing to help. Pim calls Noon and asks for regular hourly weather reports. It has now been 2 days and 3 hours since the boys got trapped in the cave.

The Governor tells the rescue team to change tactics to help save lives. Soon after, new attempts to save the boys begin. It has now been 6 days and 1 hour since the football team entered the cave, with growing fears that the boys were already dead. In the cave, Eak reveals that his life has changed after the death of his parents. With Mark not doing very well and the boys starving to death, Eak desperately tries to ensure their survival. The Governor and Namhom pray for the boy’s safe return. With no more rain forecast for a while, the rescue team might finally have a chance to save the soccer team. The episode ends with Rick swimming towards the trapped boys. While he records them, the parents watch them on a television screen.

What did you think of Thai Cave Rescue season 1, episode 2? Comments below.

You can watch this series with a Netflix subscription.

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This Woman Withstood Alzheimer’s Disease Against All Odds, and Her Brain Could Help Create New Treatments https://chattahoocheetrace.com/this-woman-withstood-alzheimers-disease-against-all-odds-and-her-brain-could-help-create-new-treatments/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 14:57:13 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/this-woman-withstood-alzheimers-disease-against-all-odds-and-her-brain-could-help-create-new-treatments/ For a woman, later life was anything but scripted. She had mutations in several genes that predisposed her to early onset Alzheimer’s disease, and she was expected to develop the disease in her 40s or 50s. Instead, Aliria Rosa Piedrahita de Villegas, from Colombia, lived healthy into her 70s without any signs of neurological disease […]]]>

For a woman, later life was anything but scripted. She had mutations in several genes that predisposed her to early onset Alzheimer’s disease, and she was expected to develop the disease in her 40s or 50s. Instead, Aliria Rosa Piedrahita de Villegas, from Colombia, lived healthy into her 70s without any signs of neurological disease – and scientists want to know why.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a complex history and our understanding is limited at best. Scientists believe that some cases are caused by a buildup of misfolded proteins, called β-amyloids, which lead to neurotoxicity. Current treatments for AD focus on preventing these plaques. This hypothesis has been around for decades, and treatments that target it seem to work wonders in animal models, but invariably fail when they reach human trials. This disconnect has baffled scientists and continues to challenge the original amyloid hypothesis, with some even going so far as to say that AD is not even a brain disorder.

This brings us to the woman in question who, although she bears all the hallmarks of early AD, seems to be shielded from it in some way. Scientists followed this woman throughout her life and collected her body for an autopsy after she died of cancer, hoping to figure out exactly what was keeping her brain healthy.

She carried a mutation in the PSEN1 risk gene, as well as two mutations in the APOE3 gene, also known as the Christchurch mutation. These mutations are strongly implicated in the development of AD and increase risk by multiple factors – PSEN1 variants are found in 70% of early ADand APOE3 is one of the main risk genes.

As expected, the PSEN1 mutation resulted in the development of amyloid plaques, but they behaved differently in this case. Typically, amyloid plaques form clusters around important brain regions involved in memory and cognitive processing, but in Aliria’s brain, they weren’t. Instead, there was an increased number of tau tangles (another hallmark of AD) in his occipital cortex, which is responsible for visual processing, and his overall disease progression differed from other PSEN1 carriers.

So why was she able to dodge AD for so many years? Scientists remain uncertain, although they believe it has something to do with the Christchurch mutations. According to a statement to Be patient, it was the only genetic trait they could link resilience to. When they took animal cells and modified the APOE3 gene in the same way, they found that it influenced the dispersal of tau tangles and delayed disease progression.

Now they hope this unprecedented brain can help develop new treatments for AD, which remains one of the biggest medical problems of modern times.

The study was published in the journal Springer Acta Neuropathological.

[H/T: Being Patient]

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Violent death of moon Chrysalis may have spawned Saturn’s rings https://chattahoocheetrace.com/violent-death-of-moon-chrysalis-may-have-spawned-saturns-rings/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 14:24:18 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/violent-death-of-moon-chrysalis-may-have-spawned-saturns-rings/ A view of Saturn from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captures details of its ring system and atmospheric detail June 20, 2019. Scientists said on Thursday that the destruction of a large moon that moved too close to Saturn would both explain the birth of the gas giant planet. gorgeous rings. (NASA/ESA, A. Simon, MH Wong […]]]>

A view of Saturn from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captures details of its ring system and atmospheric detail June 20, 2019. Scientists said on Thursday that the destruction of a large moon that moved too close to Saturn would both explain the birth of the gas giant planet. gorgeous rings. (NASA/ESA, A. Simon, MH Wong and the OPAL team via REUTERS)

Estimated reading time: 3-4 minutes

WASHINGTON — Call it the missing moon case.

Scientists using data obtained by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft and computer simulations said Thursday that the destruction of a large moon that strayed too close to Saturn would explain both the birth of the planet’s magnificent rings gas giant and its unusual orbital inclination of about 27 degrees.

The researchers named this hypothetical moon Chrysalis and said it may have been torn apart by the tidal forces of Saturn’s gravitational pull perhaps 160 million years ago – relatively recent compared to the date of formation of the planet more than 4.5 billion years ago.

About 99% of the Chrysalis wreckage appears to have sunk into Saturn’s atmosphere while the remaining 1% remained in orbit around the planet and eventually formed the great ring system that is one of the wonders of our solar system, the researchers said. They chose the name Chrysalis for the moon because it refers to the pupal stage of a butterfly before it matures into its glorious adult form.

“Like a butterfly emerges from a chrysalis, the rings of Saturn emerged from the primordial satellite Chrysalis,” said Jack Wisdom, professor of planetary sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and lead author of the study published in the Science magazine.

The researchers estimated that Chrysalis was about the size of Iapetus, Saturn’s third largest moon which is just over 910 miles in diameter.

“We assume it was mostly water ice,” said planetary scientist and study co-author Burkhard Militzer of the University of California, Berkeley.

Saturn’s rings, mostly made of water ice particles ranging from smaller than a grain of sand to the size of a mountain, extend up to 175,000 miles from the planet but are usually only about 30 feet thick. While the other large gaseous planets in the solar system, including Jupiter, also have rings, they pale in comparison to those of Saturn, the sixth planet from the sun.

Located nearly 10 times farther from the sun than Earth, Saturn is the second largest planet in our solar system behind Jupiter, with a volume 750 times that of Earth. Saturn, composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, orbits 83 known moons, including Titan, the second largest moon in the solar system – larger than the planet Mercury.

Cassini made 294 orbits around Saturn from 2004 to 2017, obtaining vital data, including gravity measurements that were key to the new study, before the robotic explorer took a fatal plunge into the planet.

Saturn's rings are seen as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which obtained the images that make up this mosaic from a distance of about 450,000 miles from Saturn on April 25, 2007. Scientists said on Thursday that the destruction of a large moon that moved too close to Saturn would both explain the birth of the gas giant planet's magnificent rings.
Saturn’s rings are seen as seen by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which obtained the images that make up this mosaic from a distance of about 450,000 miles from Saturn on April 25, 2007. Scientists said on Thursday that the destruction of a large moon that moved too close to Saturn would both explain the birth of the gas giant planet’s magnificent rings. (Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Handout via Reuters)

A study published in 2019 provided evidence that the rings were a relatively recent addition, and the new research has expanded those findings. In the new study, the researchers proposed a multi-step process to explain the formation of Saturn’s rings.

The Saturnian system formed with Chrysalis among the many moons present, they said. Initially, the planet’s axis of rotation was perpendicular to its orbital plane around the sun, but the gravitational effects of distant planet Neptune on the Saturnian system tilted Saturn’s axis of rotation.

The drama began when Titan’s orbit around Saturn began to drift outward — a process still ongoing — destabilizing Chrysalis’ orbit, they said. Titan’s outward migration is thought to be relatively rapid, at around 4 inches per year – which doesn’t sound like a lot, but over time it’s a lot, especially for such a large moon.

Chrysalis’ orbit deteriorated and the moon ventured so close to Saturn that it disintegrated, the researchers said.

“Saturn’s gravitational pull tore it apart the same way Jupiter tore Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 apart,” Militzer said, referring to a comet that finally crashed into Jupiter in 1994.

“With Chrysalis gone, Neptune could no longer change Saturn’s axis of rotation, so the planet was left to spin at an angle of 27 degrees,” Militzer added.

By comparison, Earth’s tilt is about 23 degrees.

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An artificial intelligence program sparks debate on the nature of art https://chattahoocheetrace.com/an-artificial-intelligence-program-sparks-debate-on-the-nature-of-art/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 22:01:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/an-artificial-intelligence-program-sparks-debate-on-the-nature-of-art/ A digital artwork that won an award at the Colorado State Fair has reignited an old fury about what art is and how artists authentically create. Jason Allen used an artificial intelligence program to generate an image titled, “Spatial Opera Theater”, which evokes an opera scene in a science fiction setting. Several Bloomington-Normal artists don’t […]]]>

A digital artwork that won an award at the Colorado State Fair has reignited an old fury about what art is and how artists authentically create.

Jason Allen used an artificial intelligence program to generate an image titled, Spatial Opera Theater”, which evokes an opera scene in a science fiction setting. Several Bloomington-Normal artists don’t seem to see the debate in a particularly bloodthirsty way.

The artist of the AI ​​program in the game designer used by Allen does not involve any hands-on technique. There is no digital pen. There is no Photoshop toolbox. AI works by turning words and text into an image. This raises the question of the relationship between the artists, their technique and the subject: where does the AI ​​fit in there?

Artist Rhea Edge has a studio in downtown Bloomington and teaches at Eureka College. She said the AI ​​program is a contemporary version of the debate over the use of technical tools that artists have had since 400 BC and the invention of the Camera Obscura, a dark room with a small hole or lens. on one side through which an image is projected onto a wall.

When tube paint arrived, purists also argued that those who used it failed in their muses because they no longer mixed their own colors from raw ingredients. Edge said that Jan Van Eyck, Caravaggio, DaVinci and many others used the technology of their time and were criticized until the last iteration of the argument (so far) in the 1970s and 1980s .

“The legacy of the Photorealist generation has even been passed on to our own local artists Ken Holder and Harold Gregor. They used slides projected onto their canvas to initiate their paintings,” Edge said.

Some argue that AI is more radical than past tools that still relied on the hand and mind of the artist. The AI ​​is a word interface – no hands are involved. In a sense, however, it is easy to say that the image is art.

Herb Eaton has worked in his downtown Bloomington art studio for decades, painting, sculpting and working in other media.

“An artist is a personality who enjoys manipulating the material world. And that’s what makes you an artist,” Eaton quoted, although he said he couldn’t remember who made the statement.

It’s a pretty broad definition. As a caveat, Eaton also quoted the philosopher and art critic Arthur Danto, saying “you can make art out of anything, even a sow’s ear. But that doesn’t mean that it’s a silk handbag.”

“That doesn’t mean it’s good. And that doesn’t mean it’s good for artists,” Eaton said.

Eaton said the artist puts his own perspective and memory into each work. There is not much of the material world in this one. You don’t need to have a good sense of color or good hand-eye coordination. You have to paint with words.

Rhea Edge said it just took the art in a different direction. “In the sense of the human mind and human invention, which will always be evolving. And all his creativity. This is all discovery,” she said.

This will not be the last time the debate erupts, she added. Artists will continue to develop new forms as new technologies emerge.

“After years and years, the general public is catching up with what some scientists and artists have started to discover. And as they do, it just becomes accepted. Just look at the rejection of Impressionism as a style of painting and how widespread and mainstream it is today,” Edge said.

Another Bloomington artist offered a corollary to Edge’s framing on the art advancement arc.

Brian Simpson said that every technological change impacts previous disciplines, sometimes negatively. “Each innovation stops another form of art. Photography has pretty much killed miniature portrait painting,” he said.

Even though AI can be an extension of the creative process, Simpson said it could change that process for some practitioners. Eaton said part of his own legacy as an artist is seeing the influences that shaped him – his teachers and his experiences in the world reflected in his work. And the intentionality of the creative act, he said, matters.

“What becomes a problem is asking artists, ‘What are you happy with?’ said Eaton.

It is true that there is a difference between the romantic sense of what an artist is supposed to do physically and what a person does with an AI program. Still, Simpson said there are similarities between AI-generated art and past elaborations of the creative process.

“There is a spirit behind it. The spirit decides that I want this image. And with this image, that’s the word I want to use. He (Allen) made 40, but he picked one. You can argue that choice and self-preservation is part of the artistic process,” Simpson said.

Another element of this process is the absorption artists feel as they work. It is deeply internal. It is similar to meditation. It suspends time.

Edge said it’s part of the “human ability to detach from highly intellectual, linear types of thinking,” while Simpson said he couldn’t find that exhilaration in using an AI program. Neither does Edge. Anyone else could.

“I think it’s probably possible that you’re doing the same thing while you’re working on a computer because you can get into a state where you’re not dictating everything you do, that there’s something that’s sort of automatic that takes over,” Edge said.

In the case of this particular piece of artwork, Eaton remained skeptical, saying it was unclear whether the process Jason Allen conducted was for art or publicity.

“It lessens this young man, as an artist, of a personality that can help shape where he comes from, the places and the people he comes from, and make something out of it, because everything is extravagant,” Eaton said.

He wondered if the process of creating this image was a creative artistic act or “to get a 90 day raise out of a three year career”, as one critic put it of another artist. Eaton said he wondered if it also furthered the development of this particular artist.

“What really appeals to me is that it’s almost an operation of this type. He is too young). He prepares to be seen that way,” Eaton said, adding that he sympathized with Allen because he was young too and wanted to do things to shake up the world.

But Eaton even went so far as to say he thinks the bump could be dangerous for Allen’s growth.

Some professions have moved faster than others in the digital age. Graphic design is one in which the pace of change has been rapid. There is also a distinction to be made between commercial graphic art and fine art. Simpson said some people are unhappy with AI because there’s no training involved in the traditional sense that comes from the academic approach to art. He said that this will have consequences on the market.

“It’s going to change the field,” he said. “There’s such a demand for graphic arts in terms of blogging, graphic design, and yes, that could very well put some graphic designers out of business. This is similar to computer-generated music. It’s not as good as an original composition, but it will do for the background of a podcast.

Currently, Simpson said the AI-generated images still look like conventional paintings with pixels. This may not always be true. For those criticizing him right now, Simpson said to give it some time.

“It took photography about 60 to 80 years to begin to understand how it could be its own art form and not imitate painting. So it might take a while for someone bright enough to realize that the idea is not to imitate painting, but to create an art form in itself that involves the manipulation of AI,” Simpson said.

AI art and traditional physical art forms can be fundamentally different in the emotional connection an artist feels with their art, or not. Edge said the program might attract a different kind of artist who feels the same connection.

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RMSC and RIT formalize their collaboration https://chattahoocheetrace.com/rmsc-and-rit-formalize-their-collaboration/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 21:21:29 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/rmsc-and-rit-formalize-their-collaboration/ ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – Earlier this week, RIT and the Rochester Museum of Science formalized their longstanding partnership, opening the door to more collaboration and exploration. With a more formal agreement in place now, the path between research and communication will be much shorter. “Science is a verb, it’s something we do, it’s an active […]]]>

ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – Earlier this week, RIT and the Rochester Museum of Science formalized their longstanding partnership, opening the door to more collaboration and exploration. With a more formal agreement in place now, the path between research and communication will be much shorter.

“Science is a verb, it’s something we do, it’s an active process and it’s constantly evolving and constantly changing as we learn new things, science evolves,” said Carl Uzelmeir, Ph. D., and director of presented content for exhibits at RMSC. .

Tracking this development now won’t be as difficult as the Rochester Museum of Science and RIT are committed to working even more closely together in the near future.

Anna Stenport, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, has been a key force in advancing the collaboration already in place. For her, this fulfills the purpose behind why research is done in the first place and the purpose of the university itself.

“Sharing this work with the general public is part of any university’s mandate and it’s really at the heart of the liberal arts cause at RIT,” said Anna Septon, Ph.D.

Their work with the Rochester Museum and Science Center is perhaps one of the most formal relationships RIT has with local museums, but their reach extends to all ends of the region in various capacities.

“The significance of this partnership is that it adds to our already existing portfolio of strategic partnerships with area museums and cultural institutions, so just the country village of Genesee and the Seneca Park Zoo Museum and others,” said Juilee Decker, Ph.D., the director of museum studies at RIT.

Although there is much more to discover, at the RMSC in particular, they are preparing to launch their latest collaboration with RIT in November.

“We have a new exhibit opening this fall in November called the Wonders of Water and it’s fantastic to be able to work with RIT to showcase some of the latest research and to be able to lay things out in an accurate way and create these fun new experiences in partnership with them,” said Calvin Uzelmeier, Ph.D., director of featured content at RMSC.

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You thought wrong about Australian mammals https://chattahoocheetrace.com/you-thought-wrong-about-australian-mammals/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 21:31:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/you-thought-wrong-about-australian-mammals/ A platypus at Taronga Zoo in Australia.Photo: Marc Metcalfe (Getty Images) Eight-six years ago today, the last known thylacine died in a zoo in Hobart, Tasmania. To commemorate the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger, as it is commonly known, September 7 is now national endangered species day in Australia, a day to celebrate Australia’s remarkable […]]]>

A platypus held by a human in an Australian zoo.

A platypus at Taronga Zoo in Australia.
Photo: Marc Metcalfe (Getty Images)

Eight-six years ago today, the last known thylacine died in a zoo in Hobart, Tasmania. To commemorate the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger, as it is commonly known, September 7 is now national endangered species day in Australia, a day to celebrate Australia’s remarkable wildlife and reflect on how best to conserve it.

And there’s an abundance of Australian wildlife that needs to be conserved. From the striped numbat and the long-eared bilby to the duck-billed platypus and spiny echidna, there are a host of beasts dwindling in number. Billions of animals have been killed or injured in the devastating bushfires of 2019-2020not to mention animals hunted to extinction and threatened by invasive species.

I recently spoke with Jack Ashby, Deputy Director of the Cambridge Zoology Museum, to find out more about his new book, Platypus Questionswhich delves into perceptions of Australian mammals and where those insights come from. Below is my conversation with Ashby, slightly edited for clarity.

Isaac Schultz, Gizmodo: Tell me a bit about your work as a zoologist.

Jack Ashby: I’m responsible for the team that cares for about 2 million specimens here, and also for how people experience and enjoy the museum and what they see when they get here. On top of that, I’m doing a research fellowship in the UK, studying the colonial history of Australian mammals at Cambridge. We have a really amazing collection of Australian mammals here and I’m investigating how it all got to Cambridge, who was involved in collecting it, and what some disturbing typical colonial stories might be of how things happen in museums, but also discovering Indigenous collectors who have made great contributions to the history of science that have hitherto been largely ignored.

One thing we found, researching the book Platypus Questions, is this collection of platypus and echidnas that I had hoped existed in the collection but no one knew they were there. It was the specimens that ultimately proved that platypus laid eggs, which was one of the greatest controversies in 19th century science. The idea that something looked like a mammal, which itself was controversial, but something looked like a mammal, could do something “primitive”, reptilian, like lay eggs. And it took about 90 years to finally settle it.

Thing : What is your favorite Australian experience? As well as seeing a platypus for the first time, which I know was an amazing experience.

Ashby: I’d say there’s nothing more or inspiring than looking into a Tasmanian Devil’s pouch and seeing those four mango-sized baby demons staring at you. Just the experience of looking at a devil in this very intimate way.

The cover of Platypus Matters shows a platypus swimming in a body of water.

Ashby’s new book, recently published in the United States.
Image: Jack Ashby

Gizmodo: In collecting work, I’m sure more often than people realize, you find things lurking right under your nose.

Ashby: The problem is that we have 2 million specimens that have been collected over 200 years and computers have been around for 30 years. Decades of backlogs, you know, any major museum has the same problem you can imagine. But I think people are surprised that you can’t actually list everything in your collection.

Thing : What inspired this book?

Ashby: My absolute passion is Australian mammals and their natural history. I think they are the best animals that have ever evolved. I wrote it because I realized the world didn’t look at Australian animals the same way I did.

There are incredible stories to be told about their natural history, but they are consistently painted in a certain way that we have been conditioned to write about them. And so just about every news report, magazine article, museum exhibit, documentary will describe them as weird and wonderful, or bizarre or primitive. I just want to dig deeper into where all of these tropes come from and explain that it’s not a great way to look at an animal. And primitive has no scientific meaning. No living species can be primitive, and bizarre is a biased value judgment.

Not only is that unfair because they’re the best animals (which is also a biased value judgment, I admit), but Australia has the worst mammal extinction rate in the world, of any species that extinct since 1788. Of all the mammals that have gone extinct in the world since 1788 when Australia was invaded, 37% have occurred in Australia. That’s more than anywhere in the world in a single country. It has lost 10% of its fauna and much of what remains is greatly diminished.

I don’t think it helps to call them weird. I think it encourages people to think about the primitive idea – that they’re nothing more than weird little evolutionary oddities that are somehow biologically determined to die out. I wrote the book to try to set the record straight on these things and mostly to celebrate how awesome they are.

Thing : I think some people reading this might be surprised to hear about how quickly Australia’s wildlife has disappeared. Why do you think the harsh reality is so often ignored?

Ashby: There are a few really famous species in Australia. But most people, including Australians, don’t know about most mammals in Australia, you know, antechinus, dunnarts, planigales, kowaris, kalutas and even quolls are all really unknown species. All of these names are all Australian carnivorous marsupials. But there’s just this idea that there’s some kind of kangaroo. There is a kind of wallaby, a kind of opossum. But there are 70 species of wallaby and kangaroo, there are 70 species of opossum. This diversity is really badly known in general.

A thylacine in a cage, taken shortly before the animal went extinct.

The thylacine, a marsupial predator led to extinction by humans.
Photo: Thematic News Agency/Hulton Archive (Getty Images)

Thing : You put the platypus at the center of your book. I understand it’s your favorite animal. Why the title?

Ashby: Just to emphasize that these stories are important, the way we talked about Australian mammals, platypus in particular because they are not only ‘weird’ and ‘wonderful’ but ‘primitive’, had societal repercussions and ecologically important. effects.

The way Australian wildlife was described by European settlers and scientists in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries closely parallels the way Indigenous Australians were described. And portraying them both collectively as uncivilized, primitive, and somehow inferior helped oil the colonial machine and justified invasion. It’s not just “here’s some cool animals,” but how we’ve been talking about it has had fundamental impacts across the country.

Thing : What better way to talk about these animals?

Ashby: The simplest answer is, let’s stick with “wonderful” rather than “weird and wonderful”. If the platypus had evolved in America or Europe, I would have a hard time believing people describe them as primitive or weird. They would say it is an incredibly adapted, venomous, electro-receptive transformer of an animal. It’s just about celebrating them as amazing, highly adapted species and talking about their natural history.

It’s easy to get excited about any of these animals, and I’m certainly not the only one who talks enthusiastically about the wonders of the platypus. But I think it’s just to ditch all those tropes of, you know, “Australian mammals are stupid.” That these are some kind of forgotten animals, flashbacks in time, that Australia is an evolving backwater. Get rid of one of these tropes and talk about it like you would any other animal from any other part of the world.

More: ‘De-extinction’ firm says it will bring back Tasmanian tiger

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A young CEO encourages children to “botch” their creations to innovate https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-young-ceo-encourages-children-to-botch-their-creations-to-innovate/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 05:03:02 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-young-ceo-encourages-children-to-botch-their-creations-to-innovate/ Editor’s Note: CommuniCart features stories for and about MSMEs. It’s a space where small businesses can advertise at cheaper rates and also find helpful resources they can use to build their brand. Work with us by email CommuniCart@rappler.com. “In my head, it was going to be easy,” Dani Africa said, telling me about the origins […]]]>

Editor’s Note: CommuniCart features stories for and about MSMEs. It’s a space where small businesses can advertise at cheaper rates and also find helpful resources they can use to build their brand. Work with us by email CommuniCart@rappler.com.

“In my head, it was going to be easy,” Dani Africa said, telling me about the origins of her science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning company, BOTched. She began creating her BOTched kits — which are 3D-printed educational “building blocks” for kids — with a two-week lead time for a prototype. “More than two months passed, and I had nothing but a cabinet of failures and failed iterations.”

The 17-year-old engineering design student found her calling to pursue STEM very early in her life. Seemingly born for the career path, Africa has qualified to study at the prestigious Singapore School of Science and Technology. She then went on to garner award after accolade, such as publishing a paper on the Piezoelectric Effect for being part of the winning team in Singapore’s VEX Robotics Competition.

Looking at his plethora of accomplishments, the mistakes seemed almost implausible. But it wasn’t until she changed her view of failure that she was able to shape and fully realize her vision for her business. “That’s when the name BOTched came to mind,” Africa shares.

“I came up with the idea for BOTched because I studied in Singapore and realized how much technology was being used….at extremely young ages they were not only teaching [the concepts of] STEM, but the application of STEM, which is what robotics is, and coding and things like that,” Africa said. Upon her return to the Philippines, she was inspired to share her enriched academic experience with other young STEM learners in the Philippines.

BOTched, a social enterprise dedicated to creating “foolproof” STEM learning kits and programs, teaches Filipino students the wonders of engineering and design through a hands-on approach. The principle of the company? To learn is to try – and to try is to embrace both your successful and failed attempts.

For Africa, this is a huge part of the innovation process, and should not spell complete defeat. “If we look at every invention ever created, especially in the tech industry, it’s really just someone who failed enough times and didn’t give up until they created something. And I think that if we don’t learn to celebrate failures and accept failures, we will never be able to invent anything, because no one gets it right the first time,” said Africa.

First launched in April 2021, BOTched has now grown into a six-person team delivering workshops to schools and organizations across the metro. During a workshop with the Manila Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA), DepEd Superintendent Dr. Magdalena Lim visited to speak words of support for social enterprise. “Kayo eng pioneer, pero magkakaroon pa kayo ng maraming kapatid after (you are the pioneer, but you will have more siblings after),” Lim said.

But for Africa, his most memorable achievement was helping change a student’s future. “At the end of that (YMCA) graduation, someone came up to me and basically told me he had just applied to take a STEM pathway at his high school,” Africa recalled.

For her, she thinks STEM education in the Philippines could use a more app-based approach to make the process fun and not intimidating. As in the BOTched workshops, the team encourages students to manage the end-to-end development of a project derived from textbook STEM theories. “They think of the idea, the concept themselves. And I think the process is really cool, because they also reflect and introduce it to the trainers. And then they prototype the object,” explains Africa.

Going forward, Africa sees BOTched as a model to inject more app-based STEM disciplines into Philippine schools. “I would like to see something like BOTched integrated into the DepEd curriculum where every Filipino has access to a solid, solid and, I think, holistic STEM education.”

Ultimately, BOTched and its kits champion accessibility and fun, so STEM learning can become simply an enriched version of playtime that keeps kids engaged and curious. With entrepreneurs as young and as inspired as Africa entering the market, the future is bright for a more innovative generation of young Filipinos. – Rappler.com

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Clinical Studies – Marshall Democrat-News https://chattahoocheetrace.com/clinical-studies-marshall-democrat-news/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 22:00:22 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/clinical-studies-marshall-democrat-news/ Dear Coach, I keep seeing advertisements on the web and on TV claiming all kinds of wonderful benefits of different nutritional supplements and pain relievers. All boast of having “clinical studies” to back up their claims. Is there any truth to these claims and studies? Coach sees all these ads and wonders the same thing. […]]]>

Dear Coach,

I keep seeing advertisements on the web and on TV claiming all kinds of wonderful benefits of different nutritional supplements and pain relievers. All boast of having “clinical studies” to back up their claims. Is there any truth to
these claims and studies?

Coach sees all these ads and wonders the same thing. A “clinical” study is the lowest level of substantiation of an efficacy claim for any concoction sold. For example, a company has a product to sell but needs “scientific” support to back up its claims. In a simple form, a group of people are given the product and then asked if it was beneficial. Often, the product is promoted to remedy this or that problem that someone is having. Most people, when given the product, develop a bias because the person supplying the product has promoted it as beneficial for their needs. So when asked if there was a benefit, eight out of ten said yes. This is the type of “study” that is promoted to make the sale. It is the least reliable source to determine whether the product is effective or not.

A real study must have some basic criteria to claim its validity. It must have at least thirty participants, (preferably many more) to “study”. It should be “blinded”, so participants don’t know if they are getting the real product or not. This blinding controls for promoter bias. The last and most important element is that an independent researcher copies the procedures of the original study and produces the same results. This is how a study is validated in terms of its conclusions. This is essential because a “study” can easily be manipulated with poor quality data.

Years ago, a study was done to ask if “gluten” was a problem for people in general. The conclusion was that gluten was horrible and people were negatively affected by it in their diets. This triggered a tidal wave of negative gluten publicity. Suddenly everything that was wrong with the world was caused by gluten. People went crazy for gluten and promoters of gluten-free foods spent a field day selling their product based on this study which was promoted by the media as the cure.

Little problem. The original researchers knew their study was not well controlled and was not validated by other studies. So the original researchers repeated their own study and made sure it was well-controlled with blinded participants and with a large enough number of participants to reach valid conclusions. The results? Completely random. Gluten had no effect on the participants’ sense of well-being or the symptoms of distress that led participants to believe that gluten was the culprit.

The bottom line? These studies and the products they promote are 97% B***S***. You buy the product anticipating the benefits and often feel better after taking the concoction. Unfortunately, the positive feelings often fade and the product is abandoned by the user while the promoter has your money in the bank. Good luck getting the guaranteed money back that was promised.

Don’t take health ads literally. You must realize that you are most likely sold a bag of poop. Do not fall into the trap. There are many reliable sources of information on these matters that you can find on the web. Check out “Quackwatch” and the American Council on Science and Health for generally unbiased health and fitness information. Don’t fall for the sales pitch.

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Cline House Gallery hosts Woven Woods exhibition https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cline-house-gallery-hosts-woven-woods-exhibition/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 13:43:36 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/cline-house-gallery-hosts-woven-woods-exhibition/ August 31, 2022By Bob Peters Cornwall Ontario – A cross-Canada tour stops at the Cline House Gallery in September. Woven Woods: A Journey Through the Forest Floor is an exhibition of 12 oversized quilted wall hangings by scientist turned textile artist, Lorraine Roy. It will debut in Eastern Ontario in Cornwall on Thursday September 8, […]]]>


August 31, 2022
By Bob Peters

Cornwall Ontario – A cross-Canada tour stops at the Cline House Gallery in September.

Woven Woods: A Journey Through the Forest Floor is an exhibition of 12 oversized quilted wall hangings by scientist turned textile artist, Lorraine Roy. It will debut in Eastern Ontario in Cornwall on Thursday September 8, 2022 and will run until Saturday October 29.

“We are delighted to welcome Lorraine and her work to Cornwall,” says Emily MacLeod, Visual Arts Coordinator, Cline House. “His incredibly intricate pieces really highlight the wonders of nature.”

Through Woven Woods, Ms. Roy explores the interconnectedness of art, science, and nature using techniques of machine appliqué and raw-edge embroidery. With a B.Sc. in horticultural science and decades of exploration in fine art textiles, the Dundas, Ontario-based artist spent five years realizing his vision and approached this unique series with an eye on what lies beneath the surface of the forest floor. The results are beautiful, oversized, and steeped in the symbolism of trees and their ways of communicating.

“My intention is to create an emotional connection by shining a warm light on the unforeseen forces of nature,” says Ms. Roy.

The Woven Woods exhibition will also be complemented by the work of esteemed artist Carmella Karijo Rother.

The Gatineau, Quebec artist has been creating simple and sophisticated containers of rope and other organically shaped textiles for over two decades. His Affinities the exhibition will highlight both works already produced and new works.

The two artists will be present at the Cline House Gallery during the weekend Apples and Art Studio Tour on Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 September.

This national traveling exhibition was brought to Cornwall with the support of the Tourism Development Fund (TDF).

About the Cline House

The historic Cline House was built in 1854 and served as a family residence, library, framing workshop, tea room and art gallery. The Cline House reopened in May 2022 to once again provide gallery space to showcase local and visiting artists, as well as support visual arts programming opportunities for those wishing to discover their own artistic talent.

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Edinburgh Festival Fringe Comedy Reviews: Larry Dean | Alex Franklin | whiners | Sean McLoughlin | Kylie Brakeman Presents: Linda Hollywood’s Big Hollywood Night | Micky Overman https://chattahoocheetrace.com/edinburgh-festival-fringe-comedy-reviews-larry-dean-alex-franklin-whiners-sean-mcloughlin-kylie-brakeman-presents-linda-hollywoods-big-hollywood-night-micky-overman/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 13:41:15 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/edinburgh-festival-fringe-comedy-reviews-larry-dean-alex-franklin-whiners-sean-mcloughlin-kylie-brakeman-presents-linda-hollywoods-big-hollywood-night-micky-overman/ Larry Dean. PIC: Contributed. Monkey Barrel Comedy (Monkey Barrel 3) (Location 515) Rightly nominated for the Edinburgh Comedy Award, Larry Dean’s latest show is an hour of mature, ambitious storytelling that packs a punch of comedic and emotional punch and is likely to give Glasgow’s scallywag a good name. With his expressive face and willingness […]]]>
Larry Dean. PIC: Contributed.

Monkey Barrel Comedy (Monkey Barrel 3) (Location 515)

Rightly nominated for the Edinburgh Comedy Award, Larry Dean’s latest show is an hour of mature, ambitious storytelling that packs a punch of comedic and emotional punch and is likely to give Glasgow’s scallywag a good name. With his expressive face and willingness to be vulnerable, Dean appreciates that he gives off a mentally troubled look. And it’s part of Fudnut’s charm that although it’s hinted at in the throwaway lines at the top, it quickly becomes apparent that it barely scratches the surface of his problems.

Dean has the requisite checklist of fashionable mental health issues for the modern stand-up prototype, which makes him likable. But he also shares aspects of his sexuality that require more public selling and further discussion with his latest therapist. An early tour-de-force sequence finds him reeling off his darkest final moments over the danceable accompaniment of upbeat 1970s disco, a dollop of sugary silliness to briefly sum up his recent desolation, hinted at by his friend’s infallible comedic instincts and director Paul. Even more danger and the central anecdote of his show is that he was arrested at Abu Dhabi airport carrying cannabis-derived CBD oil and HIV prevention preparation pills, a mistake of considerable judgment in a state that sadly takes a dim view of drug use and homosexuality. Down low, whether he’s preparing for his full body search, confronting a homophobic audience member in a fight-or-flight rush, or being humiliated by his posh lawyer boyfriend, Dean smiles at through tears, inspired by Paul to try out for a daring comedy debut.

As a companion show to John Hastings’ directing on the same street, and indeed, Sarah Keyworth elsewhere at the Fringe, Fudnut is part of an impressive legacy that may change your perspective on the power of comedy.

Alex Franklin: Dinosauruse ***

Just the Tonic at The Caves (Just the Wee One) (Location 88)

Alex Franklin is a likeable livewire, unable to stop performing before his crowd has even taken their seats for a late-night medley of chaotic, absurd comedy. A zoology graduate with a strong anti-climate change agenda, he’s also trans, which he glosses over with an endearingly simple explanation, and has ADHD, which is clear from the remaining 99% of the show. Bouncing around his cave with mad, tiger-like energy, it’s impossible to keep up with every tangent he takes flight on. But it frames it around the Jurassic Park-style tale of a Triceratops resurrected in 2045 and blamed for being the hero saving the planet from destruction. Quite clumsy, but with an appealing resistance to polemical or preachy didacticism, and he surrounds it with songs, beatboxing and mathematical humor, as well as a formidable routine transposing the quirks of the Cluedo board game into a world of real consequences. Not everything lands. But he’s eclectic, daring and inventive, with the fact that he barely stops smiling throughout the hour a welcome bonus, the delight of a performer stretching himself rather than his material too far.

Pleasance Dome (10Dome) (Location 23)

With shades of ET, Midsommar and The Wicker Man among others, Crybabies’ wonderful follow-up to their Best Newcomer nomination debut establishes them as the heirs apparent to The League of Gentlemen. A multi-character, sketch-based narrative parody spanning sci-fi, horror and cursed romance, the trio of James Gault, Michael Clarke and Ed Jones throws so, so much into their outrageous cartoonish plot. Still, enough remains for it to be considered an unequivocal triumph.

Set on Slug Witch, a mysterious island full of eccentrics off the coast of England, former science teacher Chris Mystery (Clarke) dreams of being accepted into the Institute of Brilliant Scientists, a fraternal club of boffins. And when he stumbles upon a mysterious alien, the monosyllabic Bagbeard (Gault), it seems his life might finally change. Except there’s a sunglasses-wearing hitman, Agent Victor Valentine (Jones), wandering the woods. And his boss is making other plans for Bagbeard.

With a long, slender physique reminiscent of Nigel Planer in The Young Ones, Gault achieves an awful lot while remaining virtually expressionless and limited to a few words as another star. Meanwhile, Jones, as the square-jawed but emotionally suppressed Valentine, delivers a supremely enjoyable performance as a Man In Black/Matrix-style villain, resorting to slow-motion ultraviolence at the end of a match. Holding it all together, Clarke isn’t overshadowed by her fellow clowns, keeping the storyline twisty, spinning, and full of gags as the trio kick in and out of supporting characters and make a virtue of their few props. With so few sketch acts surviving the festival these days, let alone thriving, the Crybabies already seem to have the visual acumen and presence to make the transition to television.

Sean McLoughlin: So be it ****

Pleasance Court (Below) (Location 33)

One wonders what they think of this spectacle in the Chinese political office and the research labs of Silicon Valley. Because Sean McLoughlin bends his tall, clumsy angular frame into full-fledged tech paranoia, convinced the powers that be are listening. After all, if he has nothing to hide, what about all the full body searches he’s constantly being asked to participate in? Few comics portray the character of the wise fool as well as McLoughlin, lashing out at his peers at the start of his show for not talking about the true Covid-19 conspiracy. So determined to stay out of The Grid that he deposits fake breadcrumbs in his search engine history, and so resistant to The Man that he avoided his place’s overpriced offer. a chair in favor of a degrading little stool that he slipped from his lodging, he makes a pretty convincing impression of a man on the wire.

However, it turns out that McLoughlin once yearned for the power he fears, with a dark secret of youthful political ambition. Moreover, his concerns about the surveillance state are not completely unfounded. Married to a Canadian, they have to go through a bureaucratic nightmare of paperwork to convince the Ministry of the Interior to let her stay in this country. And there’s an Orwellian aspect to the levels of privacy they have to sacrifice.

The intricacy and level of detail in So Be It is remarkable in itself, with the self-deprecating, understated physical comic eliciting great laughs during his water breaks and supposed grade checks. Additionally, there’s a stunning entry into the garden path gag that exquisitely encapsulates the show, turning a charming moment of personal bliss into a looming nightmare hanging above it.

Kylie Brakeman Presents: Linda Hollywood’s Big Hollywood Night ***

Golden Balloon Creation House (Nip) (Location 33)

An idiot’s guide to the entertainment industry told by an idiot, there’s a lot to enjoy about Kylie Brakeman’s Fringe debut as farcical talent agent Linda Hollywood. For the most part, the satire of show business is broad to the point of being cartoonish in a parallel universe, with the Los Angeles-based comedian seemingly piecing together her biggest viral hits. However, the subject’s smashing virtual cuts only add to the demented energy of the production, especially since Brakeman also plays several Hollywood clients, from a very funny six-year-old divorced stand-up to a famous sex therapist. who, against all requirements to speak frankly, advises only in euphemisms. By the time audiences meet Hollywood, she’s already peaked, a leaked recording of an unguarded anti-feminist remark ensuring more of her high-profile clients leave her as the show progresses. . Interestingly though, it also emerges that she had an acting background herself, with a gratuitous nudity skit in schlock straight to DVD hilariously played to its logical conclusion, albeit with absurdly funny subversion. Targeting essentially every aspect of America’s dream factory, Linda Hollywood’s Big Hollywood Night is too superficial and dispersed to fully satisfy, but it’s a frenzied frenzy all the same.

Micky Overman: Little Deaths ***

Monkey Barrel Comedy (The Hive) (Hive2) (Location 313)

One of the most confessional and revealing stand-up hours of this festival, Small Deaths, has UK-based Dutch comedian Micky Overman as the backdrop for her silly goofiness. With instinctively low self-esteem, she was too easily impressed by confident people, bullied into doubting herself by everyone from her postman to the most toxic boyfriends she’s had. With the misfortune of being born to parents who are still together, depriving her of a trauma to react against, she tried to emulate her father’s solid foundation in classical music. Yet she couldn’t even master the most geeky of all instruments, the oboe. Closer to her mother, she nevertheless also lacks her innate confidence, a consequence of a particularly particular school scenario. Yet the inquisitive Overman, whose cultural analysis is deep and thoughtful, belatedly came to terms with the idea of ​​not gaining validation from men. There’s a growing feminist trend right now, with Overman insightful into how the beauty industry and Hollywood manipulate women’s insecurities, even as she highlights her own as she reflects on one of the afflictions. most intimate and embarrassing imaginable.

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