Historic Sites – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:48:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Historic Sites – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Where to find an epic adventure in the best small villages in Europe https://chattahoocheetrace.com/where-to-find-an-epic-adventure-in-the-best-small-villages-in-europe/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:02:44 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/where-to-find-an-epic-adventure-in-the-best-small-villages-in-europe/ For American travelers, the lifting of the COVID test requirement to re-enter the United States this summer is welcome news. Free from the worries of being detained or a costly quarantine overseas, travelers are thinking big when planning their first international trip in years. The European “big three” – London, Paris and Rome – are […]]]>

For American travelers, the lifting of the COVID test requirement to re-enter the United States this summer is welcome news. Free from the worries of being detained or a costly quarantine overseas, travelers are thinking big when planning their first international trip in years.

The European “big three” – London, Paris and Rome – are more attractive than ever. But the best way to avoid the rush of private travel visitors is to go beyond the cities into the often overlooked countryside and villages.

It doesn’t mean you’re missing something. Small towns can be the best way to glimpse a country’s soul, beauty and sense of adventure. These six European villages capture the thrill of diving into the great outdoors, from climbing a mountain to swimming in the ocean.

Vernazza, Italy

Best for: Breathtaking coastal views from land and sea.

With terraced vineyards, decades-old olive groves and views of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy’s Ligurian coast is a hiker’s paradise. However, some sections of the trail network linking the five villages of Cinque Terre National Park remain closed until 2024, following devastating landslides exacerbated by climate change.

(This tantalizing trek takes you to the heart of Italy.)

The 11th century village of Vernazza survived such a landslide in 2011 and an earthquake in 2012. Today Vernazza once again encapsulates the magical appeal of the Cinque Terre, with its medieval castle ruins , its tower-like pastel houses and secluded bay that recalls its origins as a defensive port against marauding Saracen pirates.

The section of the famous Blue Trail here remains open and popular during the summer months. But for a little more leeway, head to the water. Exploring by kayak reveals a side of Vernazza more familiar to the handful of anglers who still bring the day’s catch to local restaurants.

You can rent kayaks or sign up for guided outings to hidden coves, secret caves and sheltered beaches inaccessible on foot. Look for local outfitters, who usually set up shop on the town’s charming beach.

Deia, Majorca, Spain

Best for: Mountain biking through a natural wonderland.

Built on a rocky outcrop between the towering Serra de Tramuntana mountain range and the sparkling Mediterranean, Deià has long drawn creatives to Spain’s Balearic Islands.

Today, the natural beauty of the village not only inspires writers and painters, but also adventurers. From this peaceful hamlet, cyclists can cycle on a network of paths through this mountainous region. Bike-friendly accommodations dot the routes, offering storage and tapas to refuel for particularly strenuous outings.

(The best way to see this historic city of the sultans is on foot.)

In town, cyclists and hikers can tackle the steep climb to the cemetery where British poet Robert Graves (a longtime resident) is buried. After sweating, descend to Cala Deià. Considered the best pebble beach in Mallorca, the crystal clear waters of Cala Deià are ideal for giving aching muscles a break with a relaxing snorkel.

Murren, Switzerland

Best for: pump the blood Alpine adventures.

In Mürren, the party starts before you arrive. This picturesque Swiss village is located on a mountain plateau in the Bernese Oberland so high that travelers must arrive by cable car.

Like many mountain resorts these days, Mürren offers year-round activities. Besides downhill skiing in winter, brave climbers can cross a via ferrata (Italian for “railroad”) from June to October, with or without a guide.

Just over a mile long, this wire-protected climbing course features tightrope sections, a suspension bridge and even a zipline that soars more than 1,300 feet above a valley in Lauterbrunnen.

(For mesmerizing views, climb North America’s highest via ferrata.)

Those looking to stay on dry land can find solace in an extensive network of biking and hiking trails. A small army of mountain guides can help you determine the best route for your level of experience.

Sloten, Netherlands

Best for: Navigate scenic waterways through history.

Located in the northern province of Friesland, Sloten is an onion-shaped one-canal town known for its classic Dutch beauty, with a reconstructed 1847 windmill once used to grind corn.

(Dutch tulip growers hope for post-pandemic boom.)

Rows of postcard-worthy gabled houses reflect the village’s wealth in the 17th century, when it was an important toll stop to the Hanseatic towns to the north. A marina built in the 1970s exploits this maritime heritage. Boat trips from here remind you of Sloten’s past, but you can spread the sails on a charter to chart your own route, or try stand-up paddleboarding in the harbour.

If you prefer to stay dry, you can explore the surrounding Frisian plain in the quintessential Dutch way, by bike. Holland’s extensive network of cycle paths radiates out in all directions. A stop in the village of Makkum to the north showcases local ceramics that rival those of Delft.

Chipping Campden, England, UK

Best for: Hike to a fun-loving village in the English countryside.

Chipping Campden, England, is arguably the most beautiful village in the Cotswolds. Golden limestone buildings dating from the 14th to 17th centuries line the long High Street, an enduring result of the once thriving Cotswold woolen industry. At dusk, the town seems to glow, its honey-colored houses appearing lit from within.

Named after the Old English word for market, Chipping Campden is not just a photographer’s dream. He also knows a thing or two about fun and games. As summer arrives, city dwellers join in the annual Olympics, a 410-year-old tradition that playfully draws inspiration from the Olympics themselves. Instead of fencing, competitors compete in arm wrestling. Instead of rhythmic gymnastics, Morris dancers wave scarves and dance a jig. The climax is a shin kicking tournament, a wincing take on wrestling that, thankfully, has never been taken elsewhere.

(These masked singers revive a centuries-old Irish tradition.)

Beyond the games, this hamlet is the starting point of the Cotswold Way, a designated national footpath that winds 102 miles south to Bath. Along the way, hikers pass Roman baths, a Neolithic burial chamber, romantic hilltop castles and cozy cottages.

Cyclists can cycle the Costwold Way, but there are other trails that don’t require as much time. The best is a 32-mile trip (about three hours) that winds through scenic Stow-on-the-Wold before returning to Chipping Campden, leaving plenty of time for a pre-dinner pint.

Braemar, Scotland, UK

Best for: Hike through the Highlands to historic castles and wild swim in sparkling rivers.

Nestled in the heart of the Highlands, 60 miles from Aberdeen, Braemar is probably best known for Balmoral Castle, the Scottish home of Queen Elizabeth II, and the annual Braemar Highland Games. What is perhaps less well known is that Braemar is an adventure mecca located in the heart of the Cairngorms National Park.

Surrounded by rivers and Caledonian pine forests, Braemar is ideally located to take in the lush beauty of the Scottish Highlands. There’s no shortage of hiking and biking trails, wildlife viewing, and wild swimming opportunities. A popular two-hour hike climbs the confluence of two main rivers, the Dee and its tributary, Clunie Water, before winding through birch forests.

Other trails lead to historical sites, such as Braemar Castle. Built in 1628, it was the target of Jacobite uprisings throughout the 1600s and 1700s. Centuries of wear and tear took their toll on the fortress. A £1.6million restoration project has locals eyeing a 2023 reopening.

(This country has the most castles in Europe. It’s not where you think.)

Until then, hikers can weave their way to other royal strongholds, from the remaining ruins of Kindrochit Castle to Balmoral, where the three-hour Balmoral Cairns walk connects some 11 stone structures marking significant moments in the lives of members of the British royal family.

Raphael Kadushin is a Wisconsin-based food and travel journalist.

National Geographic Travel editor Anne Kim-Dannibale contributed research and writing to this story.

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Ukraine registers 400 cases of destruction of cultural heritage sites since start of war https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ukraine-registers-400-cases-of-destruction-of-cultural-heritage-sites-since-start-of-war/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 06:01:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/ukraine-registers-400-cases-of-destruction-of-cultural-heritage-sites-since-start-of-war/ About 400 cases of destruction or damage to Ukrainian heritage sites have been documented since the start of the Moscow-Kyiv war, the war-torn nation’s culture ministry has said. According to Kyiv Independent, the ministry is using 3D printers to document Ukrainian heritage sites, with the aim of preserving them. As the Russian-Ukrainian war entered its […]]]>

About 400 cases of destruction or damage to Ukrainian heritage sites have been documented since the start of the Moscow-Kyiv war, the war-torn nation’s culture ministry has said. According to Kyiv Independent, the ministry is using 3D printers to document Ukrainian heritage sites, with the aim of preserving them. As the Russian-Ukrainian war entered its 114th day with heavy shelling of Ukrainian cities, Ukrainian experts inspected two cultural sites in Chernihiv Oblast destroyed by Russian shelling this week with the help of the Latvian ministry of Culture and Technical University of Riga.

In addition to this, two sacred monuments in Lviv and Kyiv oblasts were also inspected. The aim is to preserve and restore sites that were destroyed by Russian bombing, the ministry said.

In June, embattled Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said Russian bombing had damaged more than 113 churches across the country, just days after admitting 200 historical sites had been destroyed. On June 4, Zelenskyy said that among the dozens of churches destroyed were those that resisted the Nazis during World War II and those built after the split of the Soviet Union.

Meanwhile, the Russian Defense Ministry claimed that retreating Ukrainian nationalists burned down a wooden monastery in Svyatogorsk, Donetsk Oblast on June 4. The ministry said in a statement: “On June 4, Ukrainian nationalists set fire to a wooden Dormition Laura monastery of Svyatogorsk as the 79th Air Assault Brigade of Ukraine was withdrawing from the city of Svyatogorsk of the Republic People’s Republic of Donetsk,” TASS reported.

Ukrainians lost their lives due to the Russian invasion

In its latest update, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights noted that 4,481 people lost their lives in the war, while 5,565 others were injured. Donbass suffered the highest number of casualties, with 2,611 dead and 3,103 injured. Despite the fact that the total number of civilians killed in the Moscow-Kyiv conflict is likely to be higher, the UN said the total number of civilians killed in the conflict exceeded 10,000. According to the report, the The majority of injuries were caused by large effective area “explosive weapons”, such as heavy artillery fire and multiple rocket launchers, as well as missiles and air attacks.

In addition, the UN rights chief has condemned the scale of death and damage in the Ukrainian coastal city of Mariupol, saying the images clearly show Russian forces committing war crimes in the conflict-torn country. . Michelle Bachelet said information collected by the UN agency reveals serious violations of international law by Russian forces during a speech to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

She said: “The intensity and extent of the hostilities, destruction, death and injury strongly suggest that serious violations of international humanitarian law and gross violations of international human rights law have taken place.” .

Bachelet also noted that his agency has documented more than 1,348 civilians killed, including 70 children in Mariupol.

(Picture: AP)

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Will confirmation of alleged tribal burial sites end the Okefenokee mine for good? https://chattahoocheetrace.com/will-confirmation-of-alleged-tribal-burial-sites-end-the-okefenokee-mine-for-good/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 05:05:40 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/will-confirmation-of-alleged-tribal-burial-sites-end-the-okefenokee-mine-for-good/ It wasn’t just another government memorandum, one of hundreds to be tossed into the vast bureaucracy to act on, or tossed in a digital trash can, to be forgotten. This memo was epic. This memo was a rare assurance of equal treatment for Indigenous people in Georgia. The January 26, 2021, memo from the Biden […]]]>

It wasn’t just another government memorandum, one of hundreds to be tossed into the vast bureaucracy to act on, or tossed in a digital trash can, to be forgotten. This memo was epic. This memo was a rare assurance of equal treatment for Indigenous people in Georgia.

The January 26, 2021, memo from the Biden administration directed federal agencies to have “robust” consultation with Native American tribes regarding federal policies that have tribal implications.

The Army Corps of Engineers not only said they got the memo (from Biden), they took action. On June 3, the Corps effectively halted, for the time being, planned work for a titanium mine along the St. Marys River near Okefenokee Swamp because tribal parties had not been properly consulted on the impact of the mine.

There are Native American cemeteries in the area and no one seemed interested in knowing where. So far.

The Okefenokee Swamp covers 438,000 acres in southeast Georgia and is the largest blackwater swamp in North America. It includes the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge and the Okefenokee Wilderness and is home to a variety of animals ranging from birds to alligators and black bears.

Under the Biden administration, the Army Corps regained jurisdictional control of the Okefenokee and said Twin Pines Minerals must restart the licensing process. The Muscogee (Creek) Nation, among other tribes, was to be included in the discussion of these permits.

“There are burials all around this area, of course we want to be consulted,” said Marian McCormick, senior chief of the Lower Muscogee Creek Tribe, who lives in Wigham, Georgia. “I hope we can stop them permanently. The Creek Indians and the Muscogee are connected to the land by the bones of our ancestors and we don’t want them to be disturbed. The miners are going to be in areas where they don’t have no right to be.

It took months for the Corps to act on Biden’s memo, but it acted decisively.

“It should have been done sooner and it wasn’t,” said Nealie McCormick, president of the Council on American Indian Concerns, a state agency. “The word ‘robust’ was in (Biden’s) executive order in 2021 and it hasn’t been implemented. The senator (Georgia Sen. Jon Ossoff) had to jump in there and do something. The Corps is used to doing these kinds of consultations with the tribes, so I don’t know what happened.

A spokesperson for the Army Corps of Engineers said the agency held monthly Okefenokee reviews with Native American tribes before Trump ended oversight of the Corps.

This is not the first time that political headwinds have blown over Native American cultural ties in Georgia.

In 1997 and again in 2017, tribes attempted to advance casinos in northern Georgia. But five years ago, then-Gov. Nathan Deal said he was unwilling to cede local tax control to tribes operating casinos on federal lands if the Georgia legislature allowed Class III gambling in the state.

Now there’s the nation’s rival political parties tussle over the Okefenokee with the Muscogee Creek Nation caught in the middle.

Even with Biden’s memo citing the primary reason for the mining hurdle, it seems more attention is being paid to Okefenokee’s tourism and outdoor recreation donations than culture. natives.

In his opening remarks to reporters on June 6, after the Army Corps ordered permits to restart, Ossoff focused on tourism, outdoor recreation, and endangered species while discussing of the recent federal government intervention.

Later on the Zoom call with reporters, Ossoff responded to a question about the tribe saying, “Okefenokee is sacred ground for the Muskogee Creek Nation. And indeed, it is a valuable natural resource enjoyed by people in our state and across the country. And it has been a pleasure to work alongside tribal leaders as part of this broad coalition to protect the Okefenokee.

It is much more than a vacation spot for the native tribes. RaeLynn Butler, head of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation’s Historic and Cultural Preservation Department in Oklahoma, said her people call the Okefenokee Swamp “the most wonderful place on earth.”

Twin Pines has submitted applications to the Georgia Division of Environmental Protection for five state permits for a proposed mine within a few miles of this wonderful place.

Mining would cover hundreds of acres and could disrupt burial sites, Butler said.

“A survey hasn’t really been done to determine where the cultural venues might be,” Butler said. “We know there’s a lot of documented history of our tribes in Okefenokee, but we were abducted 180 years ago and we don’t know exactly where those (burial) locations are.

“That’s why the law requires agencies to carry out cultural resource surveys and archaeologists to go into the field, sometimes with tribal partners, to scour the land and do tests to see where the cultural sites in the field. This is the essential part of bringing the Okefenokee back under the jurisdiction of the Corps. We’re going to need those kinds of investigations.

What must be infuriating for the tribes is that it took a directive from the White House to stop the potential bulldozer of their burial grounds.

Could the burial grounds provide a once-and-for-all barrier to mining near Okefenokee?

According to an army corps spokesperson, “the corps complies with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.”

Section 106 requires that each federal agency to identify and assess the effects its actions may have on historic buildings. Under Section 106, each federal agency must consider the opinions and concerns of the public regarding historic preservation issues when making final decisions about the project.

Twin Pines wants to mine titanium in the swamp for its consumer paint pigment, military equipment and medical technology markets. Titanium is a vital mineral for national security, according to the US Geological Survey.

In a statement at the start of the permitting process, Twin Pines said: “We also look forward to protecting the Okefenokee using highly advanced and responsible mining methods and providing hundreds of well-paying jobs for locals. of Charlton County and South Georgia.”

Residents in and around the proposed site and other Okefenokee lovers aren’t so sure that Twin Pines can protect the area’s groundwater.

For now, the Biden memo offers something of a protective shield around the Okefenokee and cultural sites.

Will this protection be removed with the next Republican administration?

“I really hope this doesn’t become a political issue where things keep changing,” Butler said. “And I really don’t see it as a political issue now. We are just happy to see that we will be able to consult each other on this project.

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How preservation can bridge black history and black future https://chattahoocheetrace.com/how-preservation-can-bridge-black-history-and-black-future/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 14:28:57 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/how-preservation-can-bridge-black-history-and-black-future/ “My family and I never sat around the dinner table to talk about historic preservation or structural reporting,” says Brent Leggs. As senior vice president of National Trust for Historic Preservation and executive director of African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund, Leggs’ lifelong work is to preserve sites sacred to African-American heritage. Little did he […]]]>

“My family and I never sat around the dinner table to talk about historic preservation or structural reporting,” says Brent Leggs. As senior vice president of National Trust for Historic Preservation and executive director of African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund, Leggs’ lifelong work is to preserve sites sacred to African-American heritage. Little did he know, however, that the stories of his community and even his family had put many of these sites in his orbit since he was a child.

While growing up in Paducah, Kentucky, he regularly passed a building that was in constant need of maintenance a block from the church his family attended. “I found out years later that it was the Metropolitan Hotel,” he says. “It ties into the story of the Green Book, thanks to two pioneering black female entrepreneurs who opened their motel residence for black travelers during segregation. I had no idea national history was prominent in Paducah.

At the University of Kentucky, Leggs studied marketing and earned an MBA, but a chance encounter with the dean of the university’s graduate program in historic preservation would stay with him and ultimately redirect his career path. “I had taken courses in real estate finance and was interested in development,” recalls Leggs. “And he made a very compelling case: I could combine my interest in real estate with history and preservation, which was new to me as a way to help revitalize black neighborhoods.”

He then graduated from the two-year program. Soon after, he was asked to research the Rosenwald Schools, a series of facilities across the South that were part of an initiative by Booker T. Washington and Julius Rosenwald to achieve greater educational equality. for black children. He learned that both of his parents had attended Rosenwald Schools, and the experience inspired a kind of awakening.

“It was spiritual — the physical preservation of evidence of black history,” he says. “Since then, I have dedicated myself to the struggle of black people and the elevation of black achievement through the power of place and historic preservation.”

In 2005 Leggs took up a job with the National Trust, and the importance of his work became more evident with each project. He helped launch the Northeast African American Historic Places Outreach Program, which worked to create a regional movement of preservation leaders saving landmarks significant to African American history. Cultural landmarks like Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, New Jersey; Irvington, New York, home of millionaire entrepreneur Madame CJ Walker; and legendary boxer Joe Frazier’s Philadelphia training gym were saved.

“These places help honor the full contribution of black America to our nation,” says Leggs. “Preservation is a guideline for black people to stay connected to our ancestors who, in the face of a racialized and inequitable American society, made outstanding contributions that brought our nation closer to the arc of justice.”

Through his work with the National Trust and the Action Fund, he has collaborated with dozens of local leaders and grassroots organizations whose commitment has inspired him to persist even in the face of daunting challenges. In 2012, Leggs worked with Birmingham, Alabama, Mayor William A. Bell on the city’s historic preservation efforts. The city had a plan in place that involved the partial demolition of the AG Gaston Motel, which had once served as headquarters for the city’s desegregation movement in the 1960s, but had been vacant for more than 20 years.

“Bell had a vision to commemorate and amplify Birmingham’s neglected legacy in the civil rights movement,” says Leggs. He advised the mayor to aim for the highest national historic designation for the motel. It was an ambitious goal, but Leggs worked with Bell and community leaders at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, Bethel Baptist Church and other local sites to make that ambition a reality. After presenting their case to the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service (NPS), they were able to obtain national monument designation for the site.

In 2017, Leggs’ work inspired President Obama to work with Alabama Congresswoman Terri Sewell to establish the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument, of which the motel would be the centerpiece. “It was a great example of how an empowered black community can draw on its cultural heritage of activism to argue that the national preservation of its history is an act of racial justice and should be considered a civil right. says Leggs.

Although historic preservation may seem like a discipline focused on the past, Leggs emphasizes the vital role her work plays in shaping the future of black communities. In the case of Hinchliffe Stadium, his work not only led to the site’s addition to the National Register of Historic Places, but also contributed to its reinvention as a cornerstone of a strategy to revitalize downtown Paterson. , a strategy spearheaded by a black Patersonian, Baye Adofo-Wilson. “It’s beautiful to see how early foundational preservation work leads to something transformational for this city and for our nation,” says Leggs.

He has also seen the impact of the efforts of community organizations in projects such as the Clayborn Temple restoration in Memphis, Tennessee. The 130-year-old African Methodist Episcopal Church served as a meeting place for a strike organized by black sanitation workers in 1968, and once its $18 million restoration is complete, the building will serve as a home for future community activism and advocacy efforts. “That’s why this work is so important right now,” says Leggs. “The legacy of these places creates a model for other social justice activists to follow.”

Even in the past month, Leggs’ work has helped shape another important plan: an initiative to expand the scope of the NPS-operated site to honor the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education which was signed into law by President Biden in mid-May. Thanks to a collaboration between US Congressman James Clyburn and the National Trust, the site that originally included just Monroe Elementary School in Topeka, Kansas will now expand to six additional sites that have had a impact on the landmark Supreme Court case. The legislation represents a new approach to historic preservation, says Leggs. “This new model with multiple sites on a discontinuous border allows us to tell a more complete civil rights story.”

Leggs sees these recent accomplishments as part of a cultural calculation. “In the not-too-distant past, historic sites were preserved to reinforce the narrative of a white majority and communicate idealized, but unevenly realized, American values,” he says. “Too often, the historical footprint of black people has been rendered invisible in our national historical archives and in the American landscape. Much of the work is to fight against the erasure and loss of American history.

Patience is a requirement for a conservator, he says – the typical restoration effort takes years of painstaking work and perseverance to come to fruition. This work is not only useful, adds Leggs, but also necessary. “I deeply believe that only when our nation values ​​black history will our nation value black lives and bodies.”


Hearst

This story was created as part of Future Rising in partnership with Lexus. Future Rising is a series airing in Hearst Magazines to celebrate the profound impact of black culture on American life and shine a light on some of the most dynamic voices of our time. Go to oprahdaily.com/futurerising for the full portfolio.

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REBECCA MOTTE: The life of a patriotic woman celebrated in Calhoun | Local https://chattahoocheetrace.com/rebecca-motte-the-life-of-a-patriotic-woman-celebrated-in-calhoun-local/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 20:45:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/rebecca-motte-the-life-of-a-patriotic-woman-celebrated-in-calhoun-local/ DONNA HOLMAN T&D Correspondent On Sunday, May 15, guests, including members of the South Carolina Daughters of the American Revolution, joined the Luther B. Wannamaker family in celebrating the life of Rebecca Brewton Motte by living a day dedicated to her legacy. Afternoon activities began at St. Matthews Episcopal Parish Church with an account of […]]]>

DONNA HOLMAN T&D Correspondent

On Sunday, May 15, guests, including members of the South Carolina Daughters of the American Revolution, joined the Luther B. Wannamaker family in celebrating the life of Rebecca Brewton Motte by living a day dedicated to her legacy.

Afternoon activities began at St. Matthews Episcopal Parish Church with an account of Motte’s role in the American Revolution by renowned author and historical biographer, Margaret “Peggy” Pickett of Charleston, soon to be published his last book which presents Motte. Following Pickett’s speech, attendees were escorted to the Rebecca Motte Monument and Fort Motte Battle Site located on the grounds of Mount Joseph Plantation near the Congaree River a few miles from St. Matthews.

In an invitation letter, LB Wannamaker wrote, “I am so proud of our State of South Carolina which is now recognized as central to the successful conclusion of our War of Independence…There are many facets of Rebecca Motte’s life for us. to celebrate. I’m sure Mrs Pickett will capture them in her writings and our guests will be able to see in real time what Rebecca Motte saw from the high cliffs overlooking Congaree National Park, untouched since Rebecca Motte’s time with views and unparalleled features. ”

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Wannamaker and his wife Doraine Flewelling have been married since 1957 and have two daughters and a son; the grandparents of seven children; and happily welcomed their first great-grandchild recently. The property comprising the Mount Joseph Plantation, including demarcated areas such as the Rebecca Motte Monument, Buckhead Hill, Devil’s Track Rock, Cannon Mound and Peterkin Overlook, has been under the management of Wannamaker for over a century.

IN PHOTOS: Visiting Rebecca Motte’s reception site

Washington honored at a ceremony

“May 12, 1781 is a notable date because it was the day Marion and Lee captured Fort Motte, but it is also notable because it marked the end of one of the most important years in Carolina history. South, the year after the fall of Charleston, those pivotal months when the fate of the American Revolution hung in the balance,” Pickett said.

240th Anniversary of the Battle of Eutaw Springs

“On May 12, 1780, the patriots of South Carolina suffered a great shock; the unthinkable had happened, Charleston had fallen to the British. A few weeks later, they walked in the hinterland. They held Camden and other key positions in the state. Soon the British outposts stretched in a great semi-circle from Georgetown in the Lowcountry through the hinterland to Augusta on the Georgian side of the Savannah River. The future of the patriot cause indeed looked bleak, but 12 months later the situation had changed dramatically,” she continued.

“The Patriots, who after the fall of Charleston were filled with despair, 12 months later were filled with hope, for they had a realistic expectation of being able to drive the British out of South Carolina. However, to do this it was essential that they capture the British supply depots along the Congaree River route, for without their supply depots the British could not maintain their outposts in the hinterland Fort Motte was the main depot of supplies from Charleston destined for Camden, Fort Granby and Ninety-Six. Its capture was of paramount importance to the Americans, and it was a 43-year-old widow named Rebecca Motte who played a major role in its capture said Pickett.

The Mount Joseph Plantation in Fort Motte made history on May 12, 1781, as the site where American revolutionary heroine Rebecca Jacob Motte insisted that General Francis Marion and Colonel Henry Lee set her house on fire. newly built to force the surrender of the British forces who had made it a military post for nearly 200 soldiers. Shortly before this historic date, 241 years ago, Motte, a strong and steadfast woman who had recently lost her husband and a small child, retired with the rest of her family, which included five children, to a neighboring farm on Buckhead Hill for added security. .

It is reported that she supplied the arrows, known as musket or fire arrows, to the US Army to burn the British. Apparently, when the British saw the flaming arrows, they feared the ignition of the large stockpile of gunpowder inside the house and quickly abandoned their fortress. After the battle with the British and their relinquishment of ownership of the plantation, colonial soldiers quickly extinguished the fire on the roof of the house, saving it from destruction.

The 250-foot peak, where the house once stood more than two centuries ago, is now a monument to his bravery and patriotism. Stories told throughout the story portray Motte as the greatest lady in the South who provided dinner for the officers of both armies once the fort was reclaimed for her family.

“Rebecca Motte, along with General Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox, combined their efforts to have a virtually bloodless end to a very difficult hilltop siege there. We basically have the most beautiful battle site in South Carolina with fantastic views,” Wannamaker said.

Important dates, shared by the Wannamaker family in a brochure provided to celebration attendees, outline major events on South and North Carolina soil before and after this remarkable victory for Americans and, ultimately, the outcome. favor of the Revolutionary War for American independence.

  • May 12, 1780: Charleston surrenders as the American army is captured and the entire state is occupied by British forces.
  • August 16, 1780: The American Second Army is defeated near Camden.
  • October 7, 1780: The South’s first major victory came when the Overmountain Men defeated Ferguson at the Battle of King’s Mountain.
  • January 17, 1781: The Battle of Cowpens is won by Daniel Morgan.
  • March 15, 1781: The Battle of Guilford Courthouse takes place near Greensboro, North Carolina, resulting in a stalemate.
  • April 1781: General Greene returns to South Carolina and sends “Light Horse Harry” Lee to assist General Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox”, in taking key British posts.
  • September 8, 1781: The Battle of Eutaw Springs leads to the withdrawal of the British to Charleston.
  • September 28 – October 19, 1781: General Charles Cornwallis is besieged and surrenders at Yorktown, allowing American independence from the British.

“With Mother’s Day and Rebecca Motte’s Day, and my wife and I being together at the hip for 65 years, we just want to focus on strong women today,” said Wannamaker, who applauded Peggy Pickett for writing the biography on Eliza Lucas Pinckney and just completed the biography of Rebecca Brewton Motte. Other notable women who have left their mark on the famous peaks include Rachel Heatley Lloyd, a devout Christian; Eugenia Russell Thompson, wife of William “Danger” Thomson, hero of the Battle of Sullivan’s Island in 1775; and Martha Motte Dart, Rebecca’s sister-in-law.

Kelly Hagens-Swart, regent of the DAR’s Old 96 District Chapter and associate member of the Rebecca Motte Chapter that meets in Charleston, expressed her gratitude for the chance to visit the well-preserved area.

“I am very excited. This is a golden opportunity to see the host site. DAR emphasizes patriotic women,” she said, adding that she was a member of DAR under the leadership of a patriotic woman, Rachel Quattlebaum.

“It’s really exciting to be here, to hear her story, because she was a true heroine of the American Revolution,” Hagens-Swart said.

Two specific enclosed display boards have been erected at the site of the battle to educate those privileged to walk the red clay in the footsteps of those brave men and women who lived here, some who fought and d others who died on this rich farmland. The property has a long history. The Wannamakers have facilitated over 20 years of battlefield archaeological work by Dr. Steve Smith of the University of South Carolina, which has confirmed and expanded the knowledge base of this historic site.

“We found a horseshoe from the American Revolution, and we found a stirrup that was left behind by ‘Light Horse Harry’ Lee, the father of Robert E. Lee. There he was; he was 25 years old. Rebecca Motte was 44. Francis Marion was 49,” exclaimed Wannamaker, enthusiastically sharing his fascination with the history of his family’s long-standing property. Excavation teams even recovered one of the arrowheads used during of the decisive battle, as well as a cannonball, musket balls and nails.

“We love this kind of history, and Rebecca Motte is a heroine of our Revolutionary War. It is so wonderful to come to this celebration. We are so grateful to have been invited,” said Dianne Culbertson, State Regent. honorary from the SC DAR, who shared that the DAR is preparing to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution in a few years.

TheTandD.com: $5 for the first 20 weeks

For more information on this and other historic battle sites in Palmetto State, research the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust, which has dedicated nearly three decades to preserving battlefields and historical military sites here. A series of 79 sites have been delineated as Liberty Trail Sites along the South Carolina Liberty Trail, with Fort Motte being number 46.

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Morgan takes the lead of a historic preservation group in Chattanooga https://chattahoocheetrace.com/morgan-takes-the-lead-of-a-historic-preservation-group-in-chattanooga/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 04:23:11 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/morgan-takes-the-lead-of-a-historic-preservation-group-in-chattanooga/ Todd Morgan studied economics at Carson-Newman University in Jefferson City, Tennessee, and his first job outside of school was at a bank. But an interest in architecture led him to city planning, historic preservation and similar endeavors, Morgan says. About six months ago, the Knoxville native was named executive director of Preserve Chattanooga, known for […]]]>

Todd Morgan studied economics at Carson-Newman University in Jefferson City, Tennessee, and his first job outside of school was at a bank. But an interest in architecture led him to city planning, historic preservation and similar endeavors, Morgan says.

About six months ago, the Knoxville native was named executive director of Preserve Chattanooga, known for many years as Cornerstones Inc. Preserve Chattanooga’s mission is to protect and defend Chattanooga’s architectural heritage, according to the group. Part of his work consists of facade easements that protect important historical sites such as Customs, the Tivoli Center and the Dome building.

Morgan, 52, says he feels Chattanooga is at a pivotal moment.

“It’s growing. The pressure is on for development,” he says.

But Morgan adds that it seems people enjoy taking historic places and turning them into places that are both new and interesting.

“It feels like a really good moment in time,” he says.

Morgan says Preserve Chattanooga is also funding a faculty-in-residence for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga’s historic preservation minor.

“It’s a way to involve young people in preservation and help them understand the significance of these buildings,” he says.

Preserve Chattanooga is the current owner of the historic Terminal Dome, which is the centerpiece of the Chattanooga Choo-Choo complex which opened in 1909. A plan is underway to preserve the passenger terminal and reinvent its use as a vibrant community asset, depending on the group.

“We want this to be the gateway to Chattanooga,” says Morgan.

After working in banking and working with an architect in Morristown, Tennessee, where he grew up, Morgan landed a job as an urban planner in this Upper East Tennessee community.

Morgan says he then created a partnership initiative in that city’s downtown and launched a frontage program tied to Main Street Tennessee, which serves as a statewide resource for communities looking to revitalize. and manage their traditional town centres.

In 2013 and 2014, he became director of Main Street Tennessee in Nashville. He then joined Knox Heritage, which is Knoxville’s preservation entity, and served as its director beginning in 2018. He says he came to Chattanooga last year to lead Preserve Chattanooga when the former director Ann Gray has retired.

“I fell in love with Chattanooga,” Morgan says. “It seems people really want to work together to make the city better.”

He says the band plans to bring Wine Over Water back to Chattanooga in October. The event is Preserve Chattanooga’s primary fundraiser.

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Locals Support Land Protection: Let’s Celebrate the Antiquities Act Together https://chattahoocheetrace.com/locals-support-land-protection-lets-celebrate-the-antiquities-act-together/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 14:38:15 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/locals-support-land-protection-lets-celebrate-the-antiquities-act-together/ By Darla DeRuiter Executive Director, Friends of Plumas Wilderness [email protected] This week marks the 116th anniversary of the Antiquities Act, which authorized presidents to protect public lands as national monuments. Have you ever visited a national monument? Do you have any thoughts on what this could mean for our region? Advertising The Antiquities Act was […]]]>

By Darla DeRuiter

Executive Director, Friends of Plumas Wilderness

[email protected]

This week marks the 116th anniversary of the Antiquities Act, which authorized presidents to protect public lands as national monuments. Have you ever visited a national monument? Do you have any thoughts on what this could mean for our region?

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The Antiquities Act was first rolled out by America’s great outdoorsman, Republican President Teddy Roosevelt. Since its adoption, it has been used successfully by presidents of both parties, including more recently President Trump, to protect public lands.

A total of 18 presidents — nine Democrats and nine Republicans — have designated or expanded 158 national monuments across the country.

These include iconic landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty, Grand Canyon, Giant Sequoia, Muir Woods, Great Sand Dunes, Lassen Peak, Death Valley and many more. National parks sometimes start out as national monuments.

National monuments are also a great way to protect landscapes and artifacts of historical and cultural significance to tribal nations, the original stewards of these lands.

Public land protection tools like this are a great way to preserve special landscapes for our future generations.

More protection needed

For three months now, Friends of Plumas Wilderness has been reaching out to our community to solicit input on how to better protect public lands in our own backyards. In a publicly available survey, so far more than 75% of respondents said they wanted more land protected in the Upper Feather River catchment.

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The poll, which is still open and can be taken here, asks for input on public land and water values ​​and levels of support for a range of Forest Service land protection tools.

To celebrate this important anniversary, join us in the important discussion on how to better protect the Upper Feather River watershed.

Survey Results: What do you think of the current levels of protection in the Upper Feather River watershed?

So far, we’ve seen that clean water and clean air are really important for people, along with wildlife habitat and improved forest management. It is clear that people feel our forests are not well managed, with 95% of respondents saying that improvements are needed here.

Currently, about 4% of the watershed is permanently protected, compared to 12% nationally and 24% in California. On U.S. Forest Service lands, permanent protection may be achieved through Wilderness, Wild & Scenic River, Research Natural Area, or National Monument designation.

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Results of the initial investigation

Survey results revealed high levels of support for additional Wild and Scenic Rivers, with nearly 92% supporting and just over 3% opposing, while 5% remained neutral.

The wilderness designation received over 87% support, nearly 7% opposition, while nearly 6% remained neutral. Nearly 80% are in favor of additional natural research areas, around 5% are against it and 15% are neutral.

Finally, almost 71% were in favor of the designation of a national monument, about 8% opposed it and almost 21% were neutral. Perhaps a lack of familiarity with NRAs and national monument designations leads to high levels of neutral responses.

Survey Results: What do you think of these four Forest Service designations?

Understanding NRAs and National Monuments

Natural Research Areas protect smaller areas (average 2600 acres) of special botanical or geological interest. Their designation maintains a national biodiversity network and allows for long-term study. A local example is Mt. Pleasant RNA in Bucks Lake Wilderness, protected for the red fir and bog found there.

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National monuments can vary in size, from a few hectares to millions. When Congress passed the Antiquities Act on June 8, 1906, it created the first national historic preservation policy for the United States and ensured that the President could designate national monuments to protect natural, cultural and historic sites, as well as valuable waters and lands. scientific value.

In national monuments protecting natural landscapes, public access is maintained and lands and waters are protected for fish and wildlife and future generations. Fuel reduction and forest health work can continue and fire suppression can take place. Yet the area is protected from future resource exploitation and extraction, such as commercial logging and water development.

Each federal land management agency oversees national monuments, including the US Forest Service.

share your thoughts

The four land protection tools can be used to move the protection gap in our watershed from the current 4% to something closer to the national or California level. At Friends of Plumas Wilderness we are looking for feedback and what people would like to see. If you haven’t taken the survey yet, do so. And tell your family and friends about it!

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Over 300 people have responded to the survey since March 1. Almost 57% are full-time residents and 20% are part-time or have family/friend ties to the area. Visit www.plumaswilderness.org for more information or a link to the survey here.

Friends of Plumas Wilderness aims to permanently protect the scenic rivers and rugged canyons of the watershed. Take our survey and tell us what you think!

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Applications for the Michigan State Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program Open June 15 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/applications-for-the-michigan-state-historic-preservation-tax-credit-program-open-june-15/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 14:42:22 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/applications-for-the-michigan-state-historic-preservation-tax-credit-program-open-june-15/ Applications for the Michigan State Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program, a program supporting local projects and promoting the preservation of the state’s historic resources, will open June 15 at 9 a.m., according to the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. “…The state’s new Historic Tax Credit program will help revitalize Michigan’s historic resources, resulting in vibrant, unique […]]]>

Applications for the Michigan State Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program, a program supporting local projects and promoting the preservation of the state’s historic resources, will open June 15 at 9 a.m., according to the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

“…The state’s new Historic Tax Credit program will help revitalize Michigan’s historic resources, resulting in vibrant, unique places where people want to live, work, visit, and play,” said Mark A. Rodman, Michigan State Historic Preservation Officer.

To be considered for the program, a property must be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, National Register of Historic Places, be in a historic district, and be individually listed or contribute to a listed district.

The credit program has a cap of $5 million per year, according to the MEDC, and is broken down as follows:

  • $2 million for commercial projects with expenditures of $2 million or more.
  • $2 million for commercial projects with expenditures under $2 million.
  • $1 million in total for owner-occupied residential projects.

Credit reservations will be on a first-come, first-served basis, the MEDC noted in a statement.

A three-part online application is used to apply for state credit. Here are the available resources that can help applicants apply for the program:

The application will close once all tax credits have been allocated for 2022, according to MEDC.

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Local State Parks Offer Inexpensive Family Fun | Local News https://chattahoocheetrace.com/local-state-parks-offer-inexpensive-family-fun-local-news/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/local-state-parks-offer-inexpensive-family-fun-local-news/ Editor’s note: This story is part of an occasional series of “staycations” that allow Citrus County residents to vacation locally this summer without having to travel very far. Florida has a handful of parks in Citrus County for locals and visitors to enjoy during the summer. There is the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State […]]]>

Editor’s note: This story is part of an occasional series of “staycations” that allow Citrus County residents to vacation locally this summer without having to travel very far.

Florida has a handful of parks in Citrus County for locals and visitors to enjoy during the summer.

There is the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Fort Cooper State Park, Crystal River Archaeological State Park, and Crystal River Preserve State Park.

Get more of the Citrus County Chronicle

For more information on state parks, trails, and historic sites, visit floridastateparks.org or call the statewide information line at 850-245-2157.

Here is some information about local state parks:

Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park

Since the early 1900s, when trains allowed passengers to descend from what is now Fishbowl Drive, the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs State Wildlife Park has been a tourist attraction due to its first-rate spring, before becoming the current educational attraction for captive animals.

After the Norris Development Company purchased its 50-acre, approximately 100-acre site in the 1940s, the park was advertised as Homosassa Springs “Nature’s Own Attraction” with an emphasis on entertainment with exotic and native creatures.

Ivan Tors Animal Actors housed his trained animals in the park for several years when they weren’t performing on TV and in movies. This included Lu, the hippopotamus, who still resides in the park after the governor at the time. Lawton Chiles dubbed him an honorary citizen of Florida.

From 1978, when Norris sold the land, to 1984, the site passed through several owners.






A map of the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park in Homosassa.




Citrus County bought the park to protect it until Florida bought the property to make it a state park, complete with alligators, black bears, red wolves, key deer, flamingos, whooping cranes, reptiles, Florida panthers, bobcats and other native wildlife.

Guests can also descend into the park’s underwater observatory to watch resident manatees regularly bathing or feeding alongside schools of fish.

Visitors can access the park by taking the boat or trolley from the main entrance at 4150 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, or by parking at the park’s west entrance at 9225 W. Fishbowl Drive, Homosassa.

Fort Cooper State Park

What was once a battle scene is now a 710-acre setting for historians, hikers, anglers, birdwatchers and campers at Fort Cooper State Park in Inverness.

Built along Lake Holathlikaha by the forces of Major Mark Anthony Cooper in April 1836 during the Second Seminole War, Fort Cooper was used to protect the sick and wounded during the American conflict with the Seminoles in Florida.

With over 500 warriors, the Seminoles besieged the fort and its 380 soldiers, but were held off long enough for reinforcements from American troops to arrive 16 days later.







Fort Cooper 1 Brochure (web only)

A copy of the Fort Cooper State Park brochure in Inverness.




As part of the Great Florida Birding Trail, Fort Cooper State Park offers more than five miles of self-guided trails offering stunning views of wildlife. Cyclists can also access the nearby Withlacoochee State Trail along US 41.







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Fort Cooper State Park in Inverness is popular with biking and hiking enthusiasts




Fishing is permitted in designated areas on the 160-acre Lake Holathlikaha. Canoeing and kayaking are prohibited to help prevent the introduction of invasive and exotic plants.

Park visitors and families can also take advantage of the picnic facilities, the lakeside play area under the hardwood hammock, and a covered barbecue and pavilion that can be rented. .







Fort Cooper 2 Brochure (web only)

A copy of the Fort Cooper State Park brochure and map in Inverness.




Call the park at 352-726-0315 to reserve primitive tent camping for groups of up to 25 people at the south end of Lake Holathlikaha.

Each March, the park hosts its annual Fort Cooper Days event, featuring re-enacted skirmishes from the Second Seminole War.

Crystal River Archaeological State Park

Walk through the remains of a Native American settlement that existed approximately 500 years ago at Crystal River State Archaeological Park to learn how a human culture changed over 2,500 years along a local river system and a marine estuary.

This 61-acre National Historic Landmark and Pre-Columbian site on the edge of a coastal marsh, where anglers can also catch fish, has burial mounds and temples, a plaza and a large dump.







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Native foliage dominates the Crystal River Archaeological Site at Crystal River. The park is located along the Crystal River.



For 1,600 years, the six-mound complex served as a ceremonial center for Native Americans, who traveled great distances to trade and bury their dead, with up to 7,500 visitors each year.

At the end of 51 steps, visitors to the park can admire the view from the top of Temple Mound A, which was made from shells and sand for purposes that historians can only speculate on.







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The Crystal River Archaeological Site is located in Crystal River and includes an ancient giant Indian burial mound.



Artifact exhibits and video presentations are also offered at the Crystal River Archaeological State Park Museum, which opened in 1965 to explain the history of coastal people.

Construction of the museum in the park took place on April 11, but the park and museum will remain open during normal business hours.

Crystal River Preserve State Park

While it’s a year-round destination for hiking, kayaking, fishing, biking, paddleboarding, and birdwatching, the 27,500-acre Crystal River Preserve State Park is also l one of Florida’s most biologically diverse estuaries, where spring-fed rivers mix with salt water. from the Gulf of Mexico.

Management of the property was turned over to the Florida Park Service in July 2004, and several other parcels have been added to the reservation over the years after being acquired from families.

There is a bike path at the corner of State Park Street and Sailboat Avenue. The helmet is recommended for all cyclists. A number of hiking trails also meander through the reserve, including a seven-mile loop trail.







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Friends of the Crystal River Preserve State Park members Dorsey DeMaster and Pam Shemet return to the Mullet Hole Kayak Launch on Wednesday, March 23, as the launch officially opens to the public. The launch is located off North Sailboat Avenue in Crystal River.



Anglers can catch their catch of the day by stopping either at Mullet Hole off the first fairway on the left of Sailboat Avenue or at Redfish Hole off Fort Island Trail near the mile marker four .

As of April 19, the park’s riverboat tour is temporarily unavailable. Check back with the park for updates. To purchase boat tours or sunset cruises, visit Crystal River Preserve Adventures at crystalriverpreserveadventures.com or call 855-613-2777.

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Go out and enjoy Fridays with Lunchtime Live at Bronson Park https://chattahoocheetrace.com/go-out-and-enjoy-fridays-with-lunchtime-live-at-bronson-park/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 22:15:29 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/go-out-and-enjoy-fridays-with-lunchtime-live-at-bronson-park/ One of the best things about summer in Kalamazoo is back on Friday, June 10 as the first “Lunchtime Live” of the summer season returns to Bronson Park in downtown Kalamazoo. This weekly event returns to Bronson Park at 200 South Rose Street. This series of summer events is all about live music and a […]]]>

One of the best things about summer in Kalamazoo is back on Friday, June 10 as the first “Lunchtime Live” of the summer season returns to Bronson Park in downtown Kalamazoo. This weekly event returns to Bronson Park at 200 South Rose Street. This series of summer events is all about live music and a variety of food trucks, every Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. until September 2. In addition to food and music, there are also summer games you can play.

As for food, the city says food trucks will be lined up along the park on South Street along with other vendors set up throughout the park with food and goods available for purchase.

Each Friday event will feature regional musical talent on the Rotary Stage, located at the west end of the park. The music program begins with:

June 10 – Megan Dooley
June 17 – Hurricane
June 24 – Kari Lynch
July 1 – Carrie and the McFerrinheits
July 8 – Mike Struwin
July 15 – Same Luna band Sam Luna & Sage Castleberry
July 22 – Jordan Hamilton
July 29 – Monte Pride
August 5 – Kanola Band
August 12 – Pinter Whitnick
August 19 – Youth and Teen Talent Show
August 26 – Black Rose of Serita
september 2 – i am james

The city also says vendors who want to participate in Lunchtime Live events can register online as street vendors.

The best part of Lunchtime Live is getting out of the office and enjoying being outside on a nice Friday, and with that maybe discovering a new food truck.

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