Historic Sites – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 22:08:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Historic Sites – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Pictures of the Week: Walk on the Wild Side https://chattahoocheetrace.com/pictures-of-the-week-walk-on-the-wild-side/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 22:08:05 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/pictures-of-the-week-walk-on-the-wild-side/ FLORIDA – Phone cameras make it easy to capture great moments anytime, anytime. Did you take pictures of blooming flowers, kids frolicking on the beach, breathtaking sunsets, dramatic skylines, or a fun shot of the family dogs splashing in the backyard pool? The Florida Patch sites publish a collection of photos of the week each […]]]>

FLORIDA – Phone cameras make it easy to capture great moments anytime, anytime. Did you take pictures of blooming flowers, kids frolicking on the beach, breathtaking sunsets, dramatic skylines, or a fun shot of the family dogs splashing in the backyard pool?

The Florida Patch sites publish a collection of photos of the week each weekend sent in by readers. Whether you took an incredible photo with your smartphone or spent hours capturing the defining moment on a Nikon D6, send your photos to Tampa Bay Patch Editor Ann White at dann.white@patch.com with the location of the photo and the name of the photographer. You might see your photo featured on Patch.

This week, we’re looking at reader photos of some Florida wildlife.

Florida State Parks Photo Contest

Those who love taking photos will have a chance to win a stand-up paddleboard, state parks annual pass, or fire pit when they submit photos to Florida State Parks taken at one of the 175 Florida State Parks, Trails and Historic Sites.

Florida State Parks is launching this year’s annual photo contest, “Explore Florida State Parks.”

“We’ve had tremendous attendance at our parks, and we know that comes with an increasing number of incredible images of our beaches, inland waterways, forests and trails,” said Chuck Hatcher, acting director of Florida State Parks. “To generate more interest in our long-running photo competition, we have improved our prizes and will be adding an honorable mention for each photo category. I am thrilled to see the special memories created while exploring our beautiful parks. “

Submissions will be accepted on the Photo Contest website. The contest is open to all visitors to Florida state parks and the submission period now extends through March 10.

Each entrant may submit up to five photos, one in each of the following categories:

  • Explore nature.
  • Explore new points of view.
  • Explore Parks in motion.
  • Explore the trails.
  • Explore wildlife.

First, second and third place winners will be selected from all submissions by a panel of Florida Department of Environmental Protection employees. The first place winner will receive a Florida State Parks branded stand-up paddle board, Florida State Parks Family Annual Pass or BioLite Fire Pit, valued at $1,000.

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Museums and historic sites published on January 12, 2022 – West Central Tribune https://chattahoocheetrace.com/museums-and-historic-sites-published-on-january-12-2022-west-central-tribune/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 05:29:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/museums-and-historic-sites-published-on-january-12-2022-west-central-tribune/ Kandiyohi County Historical Society Willmar, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, $3 for adults 12 and under and Kandiyohi County Historical Society members admitted free, 320-235-1881, located at the Locomotive on North Business Highway 71 across from Robbins Island. The museum has a number of featured exhibits. Besides the museum, there is a one-room schoolhouse, […]]]>

Kandiyohi County Historical Society

Willmar, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, $3 for adults 12 and under and Kandiyohi County Historical Society members admitted free, 320-235-1881, located at the Locomotive on North Business Highway 71 across from Robbins Island. The museum has a number of featured exhibits. Besides the museum, there is a one-room schoolhouse, a lumber shed and a Great Northern locomotive. Maps of historic sites in the county are available at the museum. http://www.kandiyohicountyhistory.com/

Atwater Region Historical Society

Atwater, by appointment, call Carol at 320-266-7626, Jon at 320-444-0337, Sue at 320-220-0970 or Jo at 320-295-1354, Atwater Area Historical Society and Museum, 500 Pleasant Ave . W.

Danube Historical Society

The Danube Historical Society Museum is open by appointment, call 320-212-2877.

Dassel, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Dassel History Center, 901 First St. N. To visit, call 320-275-3077 or email dahs@dassel .com to make an appointment.

Fagen Fighters WWII Museum

Granite Falls, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, Lenzen-Roe Memorial Airport, 3 miles south of Granite Falls on Hwy 23; adults $10, 10-17 $5, family $20, active military $5, 9 and under admitted free, annual memberships available. Home to an immaculate collection of fully operational and active WWII aircraft and vehicles, as well as artwork, bronze sculptures, interactive media displays and a library. It is designed as a self-guided experience.

Meeker County GAR and Museum

Litchfield, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, admission $3, 11 and under free; Grand Army of the Republic Hall and Meeker County Historical Society Museum, 308 Marshall Ave., 320-693-8911, meekercomuseum.org.

Grove City Historical Museum

Grove City, open by appointment, call Dorothy 320-244-1044, Ron 320-693-2922 or Gordon 320-857-2636.

Talking Lake County Museum

Madison, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; South Highway 75; gift of free will. The rules of social distancing will be respected, mandatory masks (provided if necessary).

Maynard, open by appointment, call the City of Maynard office at 320-367-2140.

New London, open by appointment, call 320-354-8820, 12050 Co. Rd. 40 NE The Larry and Barb Levin Museum of Natural History is located on County Road 40, 2.8 miles to east of National Road 23, on the north side of the road. Free entry.

Renville County Historical Society

Morton, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday, Research Library by appointment only; adults $5, 6-17 years old $3, children 5 and under free. Mandatory face masks. For more information or to make an appointment at the library, call 507-697-6147, or email info@renvillecountyhistory.com, website www.renvillecountyhistory.com.

Renville, open by appointment, rue Principale; 320-329-8210.

Sacred Heart, 1-5 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays and by appointment, US Highway 212 at Sacred Heart; free admission, donations appreciated, call 320-765-2274, email shahs@hcinet.net.
Renville County 4-H: Renville County 4-H 100 Year Celebration

Benson, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday, or by appointment, 2135 Minnesota Ave. ; free entry; 320-843-4467.

Stevens County Historical Museum

Morris, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, Saturday by appointment, 116 6th St. W.; free entry; 320-589-1719. Walking tours have been developed for Alberta, Chokio, Donnelly, Hancock and several parts of Morris. They take about an hour to complete the full path; Please stay on the sidewalk and do not enter private property. Check the website to see where brochures/maps are available for each tour.

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How Ohio’s Native Sacred Sites Became a Religious Flashpoint Earth beat https://chattahoocheetrace.com/how-ohios-native-sacred-sites-became-a-religious-flashpoint-earth-beat/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 09:23:13 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/how-ohios-native-sacred-sites-became-a-religious-flashpoint-earth-beat/ Columbus, Ohio – Chief Glenna Wallace spent the summer solstice last June walking the narrow asphalt path that surrounds Serpent Mound, a low serpentine earth wall built by her ancestors hundreds, if not thousands, of years ago. Wallace, who heads the Shawnee Tribe of Eastern Oklahoma, was joined by Chief Ben Barnes of the Shawnee […]]]>

Columbus, Ohio – Chief Glenna Wallace spent the summer solstice last June walking the narrow asphalt path that surrounds Serpent Mound, a low serpentine earth wall built by her ancestors hundreds, if not thousands, of years ago.

Wallace, who heads the Shawnee Tribe of Eastern Oklahoma, was joined by Chief Ben Barnes of the Shawnee Tribe, and the two spoke to crowds of visitors to the historic site about their tribes’ ties to the mound. and 19th century policies that forced them out of the area.

“We ran programs to let people know that tribes still exist, that people still exist,” Wallace told Religion News Service in a recent phone call. “We’re still alive, we’re still active. These are still spiritual places for us.

As they spoke, the sounds of flute music and a “Native American style” drum demonstration filtered through the air from the nearby Soaring Eagle retreat, where people had gathered to commemorate the solstice with crystal workshops and a presentation by a local Bigfoot investigator and other speakers who suggested aliens or giants built the mound.

Southern Ohio is home to more than 70 earthworks built by the indigenous Adena and Hopewell cultures. These structures are still important to their descendants – the Shawnee, Eastern Shawnee, Miami and Delaware who were driven from the area 200 years ago by white American settlers. Some of the structures were built as burial mounds, while others functioned as astronomical observatories or ritual or religious structures.

But the mounds have taken on significance for other spiritual groups as well. Terri Rivera, who has been inviting people to celebrate equinoxes and solstices at Serpent Mound for a decade, believes the site should be open to anyone who considers it a sacred place.

“For me it’s a real place of healing,” Rivera said during a visit to the mound in November. “I think people were probably drawn here because of the energy fields.”

Theories about the origins of the burial mounds have also led to attacks from marginal evangelical Christians who view them as ungodly. Tribal leaders responded by educating locals about the mounds and working with groups such as the Ohio History Connection, the nonprofit that runs Serpent Mound and other mounds throughout Ohio, to make sure that they are respected.

“We believe that some of the activities that have taken place there in the past are in direct violation of our beliefs,” Wallace said. “And therefore we ask that our practices not be violated.”

Their efforts are part of a larger battle for access to sacred sites, from the mountains of Arizona to the rivers of North Dakota, to push back developers or government agencies to preserve physical integrity directly related to their spiritual value.

The federal government is sometimes a partner, sometimes not. In Ohio, the United States is working to add nine Ohio earthworks, including Serpent Mound, to UNESCO’s World Heritage List, a move that would provide additional resources to save the mounds .

The interest of practitioners of alternative faiths is also a mixed blessing. While the New Ages often share a belief in the spiritual power of Native American sites, they have occasionally caused damage. In 2012, a group called Unite the Collective, whose members identified themselves as “Light Warriors,” buried hundreds of orgonites – balls of crystals and resin, often made in muffin tins – at Serpent Mound. in order to concentrate the vibrations of the earth.

Sites like Serpent Mound have served as gathering places for New Age spiritual practitioners since the Harmonic Convergence of 1987, when believers gathered on a day they believed to be auspicious according to the Mayan calendar. The Newark earthworks, about 40 minutes east of Columbus, have also drawn attention for being supposedly built along Ley Lines – invisible grid lines that channel “earthly energies.”

In 2011, Serpent Mound was featured on an episode of the History Channel’s “Ancient Aliens”, in which several people claimed that the mound may have been used as a landing site by aliens. (Rivera’s husband Tom Johnson appeared as a guest on the show, saying he had heard such stories.)

And on the eve of the winter solstice last December, Dave Daubenmire, a conservative activist and leader of Pass the Salt Ministries in Hebron, Ohio, led a group to Serpent Mound to perform a prayer to cast demons away from the site. Daubenmire said in a video on Facebook that he believed the Ohio Earthworks were built by Nephilim, a race of giants who some say are the offspring of fallen angels and human women.

For many, these claims echo the racist “mound-builder myth”, which attributes the building of the mounds to an ancient white race – an idea used by 19th-century politicians to justify the expulsion of indigenous tribes from their lands.

Daubenmire’s group was greeted by protesters from the American Indian Movement of Ohio, although the organization was not sanctioned by the official American Indian Movement. (The group’s director, Philip Yenyo, identifies himself as a Native American but is of Hungarian and Mexican Spanish descent, according to AIM.)

Rivera criticized both Unite the Collective and Pass the Salt Ministries, saying the mounds provide an opportunity for people with different beliefs to come together, as long as they respect the site.

“One of our sayings for our events is: all nations, all races, all relationships,” said Rivera, who describes himself as having Native American ancestors but is not a member of a recognized tribe. “So it’s time to stop dividing. Just say, hey, let’s all be friends.

But Wallace said the belief in the spiritual power of the mounds can cause people to disrespect the history and sanctity of the mounds. She saw people using drugs in Serpent Mound during the Winter Solstice and heard of people having sex there, believing it would increase their fertility. Even the drumming that took place on the last solstice event, though referred to by the organizers as “ceremonial,” seemed disrespectful to Wallace – more like a “rock concert” than an act of reverence.

Joe Laycock, assistant professor of religious studies at Texas State University, said interest in Native American traditions dates back to the spiritualist movement of the 1800s, when settlers’ guilt for the displacement and destruction of Native communities may have had them. driven to obsession. It exploded in the 1960s, when alternative spiritual practitioners began to integrate “pseudo-native” folklore.

The syncretism of the New Age movement – what Laycock calls a “sectarian milieu” of different spiritual beliefs and practices – is evident in Rivera’s rally in December. The event will include a Peruvian healing ceremony, presentation by a psychic medium and “animal communicator”, ceremonial drums, lessons in “sacred geology” and traditional Maori dance, or haka.

Not all who attend these gatherings identify as New Age – including Rivera, who has said she is largely spiritual – but this type of big tent approach is a hallmark of the movement, Laycock said.

This year, following input from Wallace and Barnes, OHC began preventing groups from assembling directly on the mound, meaning the Rivera Serpent Mound Star Knowledge Winter Solstice Peace Summit will be held at six. miles from Serpent Mound.

Whatever their beliefs, visitors to the mounds should show respect for the spiritual nature of the sites, said John Low, director of the Newark Earthworks Center and registered citizen of the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi Indians. The mounds are no less sacred than a church or mosque, Low said, although their sacredness is unrelated to what is being built on the land.

“The land they are built on was sacred, is sacred, always will be sacred,” Low said.

This article was produced as part of the RNS / IFYC Religious Journalism Fellowship Program.

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Crown Point Hike with History | Local news https://chattahoocheetrace.com/crown-point-hike-with-history-local-news/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/crown-point-hike-with-history-local-news/ CROWN Point – On a gray and humid New Year’s Day with near-freezing temperatures, history buffs and outdoor adventurers joined in a day one hike around the State Historic Site from Crown Point Fort. Although they had a sense of wintry weather, unlike 18th century soldiers and settlers, today’s hikers were better prepared for the […]]]>

CROWN Point – On a gray and humid New Year’s Day with near-freezing temperatures, history buffs and outdoor adventurers joined in a day one hike around the State Historic Site from Crown Point Fort.

Although they had a sense of wintry weather, unlike 18th century soldiers and settlers, today’s hikers were better prepared for the elements with clothing and footwear made with modern man-made materials such as Thinsulate, Polypropylene. and Gore-Tex.

THE STORY

Dressed in period clothing and carrying a flintlock rifle, Crown Point Museum Director and historical interpreter Kris Jarrett discussed the history and structure of the fort. He was joined by Crown Point Historic Site Director Lisa Polay.

“I am portraying a French and Indian British war irregular patrolling the area and providing information on the movement of troops and materiel. You could say I was the telegraph back then. I’m dressed a lot like Roger’s Rangers, ”Jarrett said.

Although his clothes, mostly wool, were made in the 1700s as materials, Jarrett confessed: “My shoes are not 18th century leather because they are too expensive and not suitable for muddy soils like this. this.

Jarrett mentioned that he had to wear a mask due to the current pandemic as it was an anachronism for the rest of his attire, but during the occupation of the fort in 1775-1776 there was a smallpox epidemic with 50 or more deaths per day. Initially there was a smallpox hospital at Crown Point which was later set up in Ticonderoga.

“It’s a little scary, like you just haven’t had enough of this pandemic,” Polay added.

So far, no evidence of the burials or cremation of the bodies has been found.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE TOUR

The visit began at the water’s edge where troops and attackers reportedly arrived. Today, the new Crown Point Bridge spans the straits of the lake. This is where the French erected Fort Saint-Frédéric, of which there is not much left. It was pointed out that earthworks were just as important as walls in defending forts.

Taking care not to slip on any ice under the wet snow covering the ground, the group then headed for “His Majesty’s Fort of Crown Point” as it was officially called. Jarrett and Polay pointed out the characteristics of the fort which consists mainly of the remains of the barracks of officers and soldiers which have been partially reconstructed.

Most of the damage was initially caused by a fire which took several days to contain due to the wood and tar used for many parts of the structure.

FIRST DAY EVENTS

As an event to celebrate the New Year in the great outdoors, Day One Hikes was one of many events held across the state and nation at state parks, historic sites, wildlife areas, trails and public lands. Day one event options ranged from self-guided staff hikes to volunteer-led hikes, with some locations offering multiple options allowing people to have time and space to distance themselves while enjoying the winter wonders of nature. .

HISTORY OF THE FORT

According to the fort’s website, the French built Fort St. Frederic between 1734 and 1737 and used it as a base for raids on the British colonies in New York and New England. As a result, the British organized various expeditions to gain control of Crown Point, and in 1759 they were finally successful.

They immediately started building new fortifications which they called “Her Majesty’s Crown Point Fort”. Covering over seven acres, it was one of the largest built by the British in North America.

In 1775, at the start of the War of Independence, American settlers captured the fort and obtained much needed guns and heavy ammunition. Crown Point was occupied by General John Burgoyne’s army in 1777 after the American evacuation to Mount Independence and remained under British control until the end of the war.

The ruins of Fort St. Frederic, “His Majesty’s Fort of Crown Point,” and the surrounding lands were acquired by New York State in 1910.

ADDITIONAL INFO

The Crown Point Historic Site is officially open May 28 through October 30, but the grounds are available for walking or snowshoeing. Call 518-597-3666 or check their Facebook site for more information.

Email Alvin Reiner at:

rondackrambler@gmail.com


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A look back at the historic clashes between the Bulldogs and Crimson Tide https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-look-back-at-the-historic-clashes-between-the-bulldogs-and-crimson-tide/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:54:48 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-look-back-at-the-historic-clashes-between-the-bulldogs-and-crimson-tide/ Kirby Smart holds rare in-person interview In this era of COVID-19 protocols and virtual press conferences, Georgia Football head coach Kirby Smart showed up to a microphone in Indianapolis just minutes after landing to talk about the upcoming college football championship. ATLANTA – Another installment in the epic Georgia Bulldogs v Alabama Crimson Tide rivalry […]]]>

Another installment in the epic Georgia Bulldogs v Alabama Crimson Tide rivalry is slated for Monday night in Indianapolis, and the stakes are as high as they can get.

Georgia will have faced Alabama in two of the previous five games of the College Football Playoff National Championship.

Georgia Bulldogs football fans may not need to remember that Alabama recently took the lead in the rivalry. The Georgia Bulldogs are in the middle of the football team’s longest losing streak against Alabama, dating back to September 2008.

GEORGIA VS ALABAMA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAME: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

This game may look different to Georgia football fans as the Bulldogs are favored by some sportsbook to win the national championship.

The Georgia Bulldogs are 25-42-4 against the all-time Alabama Crimson Tide. Here is a look back at the times of clashes between Alabama and Georgia:

Georgia, the first college football game recorded in Alabama

Georgia record against Alabama 1895-1909: 2-3-3

Georgia won the first ever meeting between the two teams, 35-0. There are four ties between Georgia and Alabama in 71 total clashes; three of those ties came in the first seven games recorded between the teams.

BEFORE THEY WERE BULLDOGS, THEY WERE TOP 5 STARS IN SPORT

Georgia’s longest winning streak against Alabama

Georgia record against Alabama 1910-1920: 6-1

The 1910s saw the Bulldogs’ longest winning streak against the Crimson Tide.

Georgia won five straight games against Alabama from October 1910 to November 1916.

GEORGIA FOOTBALL COACH KIRBY SMART CAN REWRITE THE LEGACY BY ENDING DROUGHT IN TITLE

Southeast pre-conference matches

Georgia record against Alabama 1921-32: 3-7

In the last decade before the Southeastern Conference was formed, Alabama beat Georgia 177-66.

Georgia lost five straight games from 1922 to 1926. The Crimson Tide shut out the Bulldogs in three of those games.

Alabama was recognized as the national college football champion in 1925 and 1926. It was the first Crimson Tide dynasty, so to speak.

The Southeastern Conference is born

Georgia record against Alabama 1934–1940: 0-2

The first two meetings between the Georgia and Alabama football teams as members of the newly formed Southeastern Conference in favor of Alabama.

The conference was different from what it is today. It included Tulane, based in New Orleans, and now Georgia Tech, an affiliate of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Rivalry becomes tradition

Georgia record against Alabama 1941-1965: 8-15-1

Georgia and Alabama football teams played every season from 1941 to 1965, except 1943.

Alabama won three national championships during that streak under legendary head coach Bear Bryant.

Georgia were the only team to beat Alabama in their 1965 national championship season. That season the Bulldogs were led by their own legendary head coach: Vince Dooley. It was Dooley’s second season as Georgia’s football head coach.

GEORGIA VS. ALABAMA: ONE OF THE BEST AND MOST CONTESTED GAMES BETWEEN RIVALS

The Vice Dooley years

Georgia record against Alabama 1972-85: 2-4

Georgia and Alabama did not meet on the grill for seven years after the 1965 season.

The Bulldogs went 1-3 against Alabama in the 1970s before the rivalry resumed.

In 1980, the Dooley-led Bulldogs were declared National Champions. Georgia haven’t finished a season at the top of college football since that season.

Georgia and Alabama faced off twice in the ’80s, cutting the streak.

Coaching transitions

Georgia record against Alabama 1990-1995: 1-3

Alabama and Georgia each went through several coaching changes from the late 80s through the 90s.

Georgia finished the season in the Associated Press top 25 seven times during that span, but the Bulldogs’ best result was No.8 in 1992.

That year, Alabama ran the table and finished with another national championship. It would take 17 years before the Crimson Tide won its next.

Georgia defeats Alabama at the turn of the millennium

Georgia record against Alabama 2002-2008: 3-1

Alabama’s superiority over Georgia in college football hasn’t always seemed like a guarantee.

Georgia have won their first three meetings against opponent Southeastern Conference under the direction of head coach Mark Richt. Georgia’s first two wins over Alabama in the 2000s predated head coach Nick Saban’s arrival at Tuscaloosa. The Richt Bulldogs faced Mike Shula’s Crimson Tide and swept a back and forth streak between the two programs: 27-25 in 2002 and 37-23 in 2003.

The first meeting between the Richt Bulldogs and the Nick Saban Bulldogs was a 26-23 overtime win for Georgia at Tuscaloosa in 2007, Saban’s first season as head coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide. . Georgia lost a home game to Alabama in Athens the following year. The loss marked the start of Alabama’s seven-game winning streak against Georgia.

Crimson Tide defeats Bulldogs in Championship games

Georgia record against Alabama from 2012 to 2021: 0-6

ATLANTA, GA – DECEMBER 04: General action during the SEC Championship game between the Alabama Crimson Tide and the Georgia Bulldogs on December 4, 2021 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Ga. (Photo by Jeffrey Vest / Icon Sportswire via Getty Picture (Getty Images)

The pain of the 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship game may be fresher for Georgia Bulldogs football fans than the team’s last loss in the 2021 Southeastern Conference Championship.

Four of the last seven games between the teams have been at “neutral” venues – all four games have been played at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta or the Georgia Dome.

REMEMBERING THE DME OF GEORGIA

Georgia lost the 2012 SEC Championship game on a red zone snapshot with time expired. Georgia led in the fourth quarter, but Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron led the Crimson Tide in a scoring campaign that left Georgia with 3:15 left to score, requiring a touchdown. Alabama defeated Notre Dame in the BCS National Championship game. Georgia won the Capital One Bowl over Nebraska.

Georgia met Alabama in a championship game in Atlanta just over five years later. Alabama won the national championship game on Jan. 9, 2018, in overtime when quarterback Tua Tagovailoa connected with wide receiver and future Heisman Trophy winner DeVonta Smith on a 41-yard pass.

Georgia lost two more SEC Championship clashes to Alabama in 2018 and 2021. Georgia led 28-21 in the fourth quarter of the 2018 SEC Championship before Alabama rallied to win. Georgia’s most recent game with Alabama in the 2021 SEC Championship is the only loss the Bulldogs have suffered this season.

Georgia also went 0-2 in regular season games against Alabama in 2015 and 2020.

Historical games and data courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications and College football benchmark.

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Just say no | Richmond Free Press https://chattahoocheetrace.com/just-say-no-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 23:22:55 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/just-say-no-richmond-free-press/ Just because someone gives you something doesn’t mean it’s worth having. Latest examples: the 12-ton, 21-foot bronze statue of Confederate Robert E. Lee from Monument Avenue and several other rebel monuments belonging to the city that were shot down last year, including those of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Gen JEB Stuart and General Stonewall Jackson […]]]>

Just because someone gives you something doesn’t mean it’s worth having.

Latest examples: the 12-ton, 21-foot bronze statue of Confederate Robert E. Lee from Monument Avenue and several other rebel monuments belonging to the city that were shot down last year, including those of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Gen JEB Stuart and General Stonewall Jackson and Matthew Fontaine Maury, also from Monument Avenue.

Governor Ralph S. Northam and Richmond Mayor Levar M. Stoney announced plans to donate this collection of Confederate wrecks and wrecks to the Black History Museum and Cultural Center in Virginia last week. Jackson Ward’s Small Private Museum will be working with The Valentine, another small private downtown museum that focuses on Richmond history, to find out what to do with these behemoths.

Under the proposed arrangement, which must be approved by Richmond City Council, the public will have a voice in what happens to the statues.

Some people have praised the move on social media. They called it “poetic justice” in making the museum and the descendants of those enslaved for centuries by white oppressors – and later by the traitors who led the Southern rebellion against the States -United to keep blacks in slavery – to monitor the fate of the statues erected by white supremacists and their descendants to honor the lost cause and remind blacks of their continued inferior status in the social order of the South.

“Symbols matter, and for too long, Virginia’s most important symbols have celebrated the tragic division of our country and the side that fought to keep the institution of slavery alive by any means possible.” Governor Northam said in a press release announcing the giveaway. “Now it will be up to our thoughtful museums, informed by the people of Virginia, to determine the future of these artifacts, including the base of the Lee Monument which has taken on special significance as an art of protest.”

The big question: why would the Black History Museum – and black people in general – want to have anything to do with these monuments?

For centuries we have had to deal with white people and all their “stuff” – their houses, their kitchens, their laundry, their children, their crops, their cattle, their businesses – first on the plantations and later on. as “engaged” workers. . Why do we now want to have the burden of taking care of their statues?

Why should the Black History Museum divert its time, attention and resources to dealing with these remnants of hate?

Until now, the state and the city were responsible for the storage, maintenance and security of the statues. What will happen when the statues suddenly belong to the Black History Museum? Will the museum – not quite aware of the money – have to pay these bills?

How many of the museum’s current loyal donors would be willing to continue giving knowing their money will be spent to properly protect this new Confederate cache which the city estimates to be worth $ 12 million?

We believe many will turn to directed giving, stipulating that their donations will be targeted to specific areas and not to the support or maintenance of Confederate statues.

For years, we at Free Press have called for the symbols of white supremacy and racial oppression on Monument Avenue to be erased from the city’s landscape. And we are glad that they have now been withdrawn. We have recommended in the past that they be donated or sold to the National Park Service Civil War battlefields or other related historical sites, such as birthplaces or Civil War museums or cemeteries, as contextual artifacts.

Since their removal in mid-2020, the statues have become something of an albatross around the neck of the city of Richmond, who have wondered what to do with them. At the end of 2020, the city received nearly twenty offers from 17 organizations and five individuals who expressed their interest in acquiring the statues. The Black History Museum and Cultural Center in Virginia was not one of them. Most of the submissions, which came from as far away as California, requested the statues for free.

An Los Angeles museum wanted them for up to two years for an exhibition, the Free Press reported in November 2020, while a Connecticut art studio proposed that the statues be smashed and the pieces sold as a collection. fund for Richmond public schools and charitable groups in the city.

Currently dealing with COVID-19 and other pressing issues, the statues have not been a priority for the city and the Stoney administration, which has spent $ 1.8 million to bring them down. And the matter of Lee’s statue and pedestal has been a political hot potato for Gov. Northam’s administration, which doesn’t want to leave the question of what to do with it to Gov.-elect Glenn A. Youngkin’s next Republican administration, who could very well decide to put the statue of Lee back in place.

However, we believe that the donation of the statues is a burden that should not fall on the Black History Museum, despite comments from Marland Buckner, the museum’s acting executive director.

“Our institution takes very seriously the responsibility of managing these objects in such a way as to ensure that their origins and purpose are never forgotten…”, said Mr. Buckner. “We believe that with this responsibility comes also opportunities – opportunities to deepen our understanding of a vital part of American history: the expansion of freedom.

“We hope this process will elevate public dialogue about our common history …”

While the museum is a venerable institution representing black history in Richmond and across the Commonwealth, the museum would certainly want to weigh in on what should happen to Confederate artifacts. But owning them and being the responsible entity for them is like giving a poisoned apple to a hungry man. This story does not end well.

At the risk of an about-face, we suggest that the Black History Museum organize a charity sale or auction to get rid of these statues once and for all – to make the resettlement sites their own – and then use the produced to pursue its own mission of telling the story of Black people, their lives, stories and achievements, even in the face of centuries of oppression.

Or the museum could just say no and refuse these “gifts”.


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Susquehanna Greenway Partnership Wins Grant to Support Outdoor Recreation in 2022 | Outside https://chattahoocheetrace.com/susquehanna-greenway-partnership-wins-grant-to-support-outdoor-recreation-in-2022-outside/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/susquehanna-greenway-partnership-wins-grant-to-support-outdoor-recreation-in-2022-outside/ Lewisburg, Pennsylvania – Getting outside was one way to escape COVID-19 limits in 2020 and 2021. And outside, people have gone in droves. Attendance at state parks rose from 37 million in 2019 to over 46.9 million in 2020, an increase of 26.6%, according to state statistics. The Natural Resources Conservation Authority (DCNR) reported an […]]]>

Lewisburg, Pennsylvania – Getting outside was one way to escape COVID-19 limits in 2020 and 2021. And outside, people have gone in droves.

Attendance at state parks rose from 37 million in 2019 to over 46.9 million in 2020, an increase of 26.6%, according to state statistics.

The Natural Resources Conservation Authority (DCNR) reported an increase of 7.5 million users / visits to its website in 2020 compared to the previous year, including more than four million new users.

A new grant aimed at improving access and quality of outdoor recreation is helping meet the demand for enjoyable outdoor experiences near home.

DCNR has made a major grant to the Susquehanna Greenway Partnership (SGP) in the amount of $ 253,000 from the Community Conservation Partnerships program, according to Cindy Adams Dunn, secretary of DCNR.

“Funding secured through the C2P2 grant will allow SGP and our staff to help communities large and small across the region navigate the planning process for the completion of their recreation projects,” said Corey. Ellison, executive director of SGP.

“It will also support SGP’s unique programs such as our annual paddling and cycling events, educational workshops, water trail management, and the production of online and print resources that provide key information on how to access parks, trails and water trails along the Susquehanna Greenway, ”she said.

Funding for the grant is in line with the results of a survey by the Center for Survey Research at Penn State Harrisburg conducted in the fall of 2020, trails and open spaces should be considered a top priority by state and local governments.

Funding sources for this significant grant come from a variety of entities, including the Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund, the Environmental Stewardship Fund, ATV and Snowmobile Limited Management Accounts, and the Pennsylvania Heritage Area Program; and the Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund and the Recreational Trails Program.

In a commitment to building community conservation partnerships with local governments and non-profit organizations, the goal is to protect critical natural areas and open spaces, develop greenways and trails, provide parks , quality recreation and conservation opportunities.

“The Susquehanna Greenway Partnership and our Board of Directors are very grateful to DCNR for continuing to identify SGP as a key partner in the growth of recreation in central Pennsylvania,” said Ellison. “Their support enables our staff and partners in the region and state to continue their important work of connecting the public to the vast outdoor spaces of our state and promoting healthy, active lives.

Overall, investing in organizations like SGP aims to improve the quality of life in communities in Pennsylvania.

In a letter to SGP, Dunn said, “Your DCNR grant is recognition of outstanding recreation and conservation work that should be shared with your community. ”

SGP serves as a resource for the many outdoor opportunities that exist in the great Susquehanna Greenway corridor. Through this network, adventurers and outdoor enthusiasts alike find it possible to continuously walk, cycle or paddle from town to town along the 500-mile corridor of the Susquehanna Greenway.

Subscribe to SGP Facebook and Instagram accounts, which showcase the beauty and endless recreational opportunities available along the river.

Our content is free, but our journalists work hard. 100% of your contribution to NorthcentralPa.com goes directly to helping us cover important news and events in our area. Please say local news matters!



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Detroit’s first black-owned bookstore receives preservation grant https://chattahoocheetrace.com/detroits-first-black-owned-bookstore-receives-preservation-grant/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 22:35:41 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/detroits-first-black-owned-bookstore-receives-preservation-grant/ TAcross the country, there are physical structures steeped in the fabric of African American history; the walls of these spaces house stories that illustrate black resilience and black joy. The National Park Service is making a concerted effort to ensure that these historic sites exist for generations to come. According to Michigan Advance, the Vaughn’s […]]]>

TAcross the country, there are physical structures steeped in the fabric of African American history; the walls of these spaces house stories that illustrate black resilience and black joy. The National Park Service is making a concerted effort to ensure that these historic sites exist for generations to come. According to Michigan Advance, the Vaughn’s Bookstore site in Detroit received a preservation grant from the NPS.

The bookstore, which was operated by a Michigan politician Ed vaughn– was the first black-owned bookstore in the city. Vaughn, who served in the state House of Representatives in the 1970s and 1990s, opened the store in the early 1960s. Amid the civil rights movement, the Vaughn Bookstore quickly became a mainstay within the community ; serving as a space for black authors and poets to share their work and also becoming the backdrop for meetings organized by local neighborhood leaders. During its nearly 40 years of existence, the store has had several lifetimes. It closed in 1967 following civil unrest in Detroit, but Vaughn eventually reopened. No matter how many times he reinvented the bookstore, he stuck with his original mission of celebrating black literature and making it accessible. The Vaughn Bookstore closed in the late 1990s.

“The Vaughn Bookstore was definitely something new to the community. There hadn’t been a bookstore here before, ”Vaughn said in an interview. “I got into the business because I was looking for a book called Ginsberg’s A Hundred Years of Lynching, and I was told downtown that they didn’t have the book in stock and I was told. decided to see if I could find it. When I found it and my friends in the post said they would like to read this and other black books, I started ordering them and selling them in the trunk of my car. Then I opened the Vaughn Bookstore and we started selling books pretty quickly, people were asking questions, and that was kind of the vibe around the bookstore. There was a growing awareness throughout the community. The National Park Service has awarded $ 15,000 to conserve the site as part of a larger preservation initiative that will support 17 projects in 14 states.

In recent years, the NPS has unveiled initiatives to preserve historic spaces on HBCU campuses. In 2020, the agency announced that $ 7.7 million in grants will go towards the restoration and conservation of these structures.

SEE ALSO:

Chicago home of legendary musician Muddy Waters receives preliminary monument status

HBCU Preservation Projects to Receive $ 7.7 Million in National Park Service Grants

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The family finally parks their camper van, settles in Bellevue https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-family-finally-parks-their-camper-van-settles-in-bellevue/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 06:07:03 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-family-finally-parks-their-camper-van-settles-in-bellevue/ BELLEVUE, Iowa (AP) – Candy Sinar opened the door to her family’s RV and walked inside. His gaze lingered on the compact kitchen area with its restaurant-style cabin. Wooden signs with Bible verses and uplifting quotes adorned the walls, and colorful magnets from various American cities lined the refrigerator. “For six and a half years […]]]>

BELLEVUE, Iowa (AP) – Candy Sinar opened the door to her family’s RV and walked inside.

His gaze lingered on the compact kitchen area with its restaurant-style cabin. Wooden signs with Bible verses and uplifting quotes adorned the walls, and colorful magnets from various American cities lined the refrigerator.

“For six and a half years it was my home,” she said.

“It was very comfortable,” added her husband, Paul, with a smile.


As of 2015, the couple and their two children – Emily, now 17, and Tyler, 13 – have been living on the road in their 420 square foot motorhome. Originally from Texas, they rode the country’s highways for years but eventually settled into a tiny house in Bellevue after falling in love with the river town.

The Dubuque Telegraph Herald reports that Paul and Candy had considered living in a full-time RV as a retirement plan. But after quitting their jobs in Christian ministry and starting a business, the couple decided it was time to give it a go.

“We love adventure and we love to learn new things,” said Candy.

They looked for other families who had been successful in mobile life, then sold their home and bought a 42ft motorhome. The children’s bunk room would also serve as Paul’s office for the mobile media production and marketing company, with the “master bedroom” and bathroom to the front of the deck.

July 17, 2015 – a date the family now calls their “nomad birthday” – the quartet and their black lab, Tipper, hit the road.

Over the next six years, they visited 36 states. They’ve been through more, but the family only counts a state if they stay at least one night and “do something fun,” according to Paul.

They explored national parks, historic sites and museums. These tours were often part of the children’s ‘road school’, a mix of online and experiential learning programs.

“They learned about the Civil War by visiting Gettysburg,” said Paul as an example.

Emily remembered visits to the homes of Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King Jr., and Tyler especially enjoyed the Badlands. Paul and Candy remembered seeing a total solar eclipse in rural Nebraska.

During the winters, the Sinars returned to Texas to visit family and friends they met through Fulltime Families, a national group of RV families.

Although Emily and Tyler said it took a while for them to adjust to their new lifestyle, they enjoyed the chance to explore new places.

“Every day you look out the window and see a new backyard,” Tyler said.

They also cherished the family ties created by life in a motorhome.

“Being in such close quarters, although it can sometimes be a lot, actually brought us together,” Emily said. “We’re all best friends now, and it’s great because we see each other all the time, and we’re really happy about it.”

The Sinars had no plans to move to Bellevue until 2018, when, during an overnight layover in Bellevue State Park, Candy tripped over a crack and broke her foot. The overnight stay became a six-week residence as she healed, and the family fell in love with the small town.

They returned to Bellevue over the next two summers and visited area attractions ranging from Maquoketa Caves State Park to the Dubuque Farmer’s Market. This year, they parked for almost six months at the Off Shore Resort, where Emily found a summer job.

As they fell in love with Bellevue, the family also began to think about ending their days on the road. Booking campsites had become more difficult, said Candy, and Emily turned to the university. If they were going to settle down, they felt Bellevue would be the place.

“In everything we do we have been very aware of how the Lord leads us. He has brought us alongside other families and individuals on the road going through difficult times, and we really feel like God has led us into the community of Bellevue, ”said Paul.

In October, a Bellevue house goes up for sale and the Sinars jump at the chance. They briefly traveled to South Texas to see family and friends before returning to Bellevue earlier this month.

Friends from previous visits have donated furniture to spruce up the new home, and now family members are adjusting to whatever space they suddenly have available. Their 1,500 square foot home is more than three times the size of their old home. Tyler’s room alone would fill about two-thirds of the motorhome.

“We all have our own bedrooms, but for some reason I always want to be here with everyone,” Emily said, gesturing around the living room.

Still, they all look forward to the rhythm of their new lives, from volunteering at the Bellevue Community Cupboard to Thursday nights at River Ridge Brewing.

And the motorhome will stay parked in the backyard of the Sinars, ready for weekend trips or extended vacations.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen from here on out, and we’re just part of the game,” Paul said.


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Canalway Towpath Trail turns 25: Talk of the Towns https://chattahoocheetrace.com/canalway-towpath-trail-turns-25-talk-of-the-towns/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:39:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/canalway-towpath-trail-turns-25-talk-of-the-towns/ BRECKSVILLE, Ohio – With 2.5 million visitors per year who make their way to the iconic 101-mile towpath that runs through the heart of the canal, the Ohio & Erie Canalway National Heritage Zone team is delighted to announce the celebration of its 25th anniversary. The Ohio & Erie Canalway is a National Heritage Area […]]]>

BRECKSVILLE, Ohio – With 2.5 million visitors per year who make their way to the iconic 101-mile towpath that runs through the heart of the canal, the Ohio & Erie Canalway National Heritage Zone team is delighted to announce the celebration of its 25th anniversary.

The Ohio & Erie Canalway is a National Heritage Area designated by Congress in 1996 to preserve and celebrate the rails, trails, landscapes, towns and sites that grew along the first 110 miles of the canal that helped America to develop.

The Congressional designation was given to the Ohio & Erie Canalway National Heritage Area in 1996, thanks to a young lawyer, Ralph Regula, in the village of Navarre.

Canalway Partners was founded in Cleveland to focus on the project in Cleveland and Cuyahoga counties, and the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition was founded in Canal Fulton to focus on Summit, Stark and Tuscarawas counties. Working together, Canalway Partners and the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition advocated for Congressional designation of the Ohio & Erie Canalway National Heritage Area in 1996.

Since then, the main achievements of the region include:

  • Ohio & Erie Canalway State and National Scenic Byway designation by the Ohio Department of Transportation and Federal Highway Administration
  • Development of over 90 miles of the multi-use Ohio & Erie Canal towpath, creating a framework that spurred planning for over 500 miles of regional connecting trails
  • Designation of the Cuyahoga River as an American Heritage River

Co-directors of the Ohio & Erie Canalway Association, who manage the Ohio & Erie Canal National Heritage Area, Dan Rice and Mera Cardenas share: “By working together we are creating a legacy for future generations in Ohio & Erie Canalway National Heritage Area. Since 1986, we’ve celebrated natural, historic and recreational resources along the historic Cleveland Canal in New Philadelphia. In partnership and in collaboration with our neighbors, community organizations, elected officials, government units and funders, we are developing the 101 mile Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath and over 500 miles of connecting trails, preserving historic buildings and natural areas, and create programming that enhances the enjoyment of the region.

Looking to the future, the team is excited to share strategic plans that include:

  • Completing the 101 mile Ohio and Erie Canal towpath from Cleveland to New Philadelphia, Ohio
  • The development of 500 miles of regional connection trails, including the Zoar Connection Trail, the Rubber City Heritage Trail, the Freedom Trail, and the New Philadelphia Bicycle and Connectivity Plan
  • Implementation of the Canal Basin Park in Cleveland
  • Akron Civic Commons Lock 3 and Summit Lake Park implementation in Akron along the Ohio & Erie Canal towpath
  • Promotion of natural, historic and recreational resources along the Ohio National Heritage Area and the Erie Canal.

For more information on the Ohio National Heritage Area and the Erie Canal, please visit ohioanderiecanalway.com.

Gardening club: Welcome to Chippewa Garden. Garden Clubs are for everyone. Join a friend or join yourself. You are sure to meet many like-minded gardeners and garden enthusiasts.

Here are five reasons why you should join a Garden Club:

1. You have a green thumb

2. You don’t have a green thumb

3. You like to learn gardening

4. You care about conservation

5. You want to talk about gardens with other garden-conscious people

And don’t forget the flower shows. The garden club’s flower shows are the highlights of each season.

Join the Chippewa Garden Club on the 4th Tuesday of the month starting Jan. 25 at 6:30 p.m. at the Brecksville Human Services Building, 2 Community Drive, Brecksville. The social services building is located behind the community center. This meeting will provide highlights for 2021, as well as committees discussing plans and projects for 2022.

Also, Deyampert Giles, horticulturist, designer and certified arborist ISA, will present his program “From the garden to the bottle”, which will explore the wide range of plants used in the perfume industry.

It would be a great opportunity for someone to hear what the club have been up to in the past and what they are planning to do in the future.

For more information, please contact Noreen at 440-838-1186 or MsNoreen@att.net. As well. visit www.ChippewaGardenClub.com or follow the club on Facebook for articles on the garden and club activities.

Chippewa Garden Club is a member of the National Garden Club, Inc.-Central Atlantic Region, the Garden Club of Ohio, Inc.-Cleveland District, and Holden Forests & Gardens.

Holiday lights: Holiday lights are considered tangles and should not be placed in your curbside collection in Broadview Heights. Tanglers, such as Christmas lights and power cords, will cause problems and downtime at the local recycling facility. All broken and burnt out string lights, power strips, and power cords can be dropped off at the Broadview Heights Service Garage off Oakes Road. There will be a trash can outside with a sign. Place lost items in the trash and take all bags and boxes home. Artificial trees, solar lights and outdoor spotlights are not accepted.

Read more news from the Sun Star Mail here.

Let the communities of Brecksville, Broadview Heights and North Royalton know what’s going on with your organization, church, school, business or family. Write to me at shirleymac48@att.net.


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