Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 02:01:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Visitors to Mississippi can find history, entertainment, food and fun https://chattahoocheetrace.com/visitors-to-mississippi-can-find-history-entertainment-food-and-fun/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 02:01:35 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/visitors-to-mississippi-can-find-history-entertainment-food-and-fun/ Mississippi offers travelers a wide range of options, including beautiful remote campsites, great places to canoe or kayak, and places to learn about the state’s history. Below we feature some of the best places to visit in Mississippi. Natchez: Historic Natchez is one of the best-preserved southern towns in the United States, with stately antebellum […]]]>

Mississippi offers travelers a wide range of options, including beautiful remote campsites, great places to canoe or kayak, and places to learn about the state’s history.

Below we feature some of the best places to visit in Mississippi.

Natchez: Historic Natchez is one of the best-preserved southern towns in the United States, with stately antebellum plantation homes set on the cliffs of the Mississippi River overlooking the rich, flat lands of the Louisiana Delta of the other side.

Places to visit:Escape to These 5 Great Places for Kayaking, Canoeing, and Camping

Hit the road for a quick trip

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Antebellum home, over 100 acres up for auction https://chattahoocheetrace.com/antebellum-home-over-100-acres-up-for-auction/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:16:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/antebellum-home-over-100-acres-up-for-auction/ NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) – A pre-war home and more than a hundred acres in Whites Creek will be auctioned off. The region is rich in history. “And goes back to 1797, before Nashville was a city,” said Whites Creek Historical Society vice president Angela Williams. The house is known as The Graves House and was […]]]>

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) – A pre-war home and more than a hundred acres in Whites Creek will be auctioned off.

The region is rich in history.

“And goes back to 1797, before Nashville was a city,” said Whites Creek Historical Society vice president Angela Williams.

The house is known as The Graves House and was built in the 1850s. However, the land was inhabited long before that, according to Williams. She is more than the vice-president of the Historical Society; it is also a neighbor of the property.

“We have archaeological evidence dating back to the Archaic Age of 5,000 years ago that there are communities of Native Americans who lived here that predate our current tribes,” Williams said.

Later, a herd of cows was grazing on the land.

“It’s called Little Switzerland because of all the dairy farms that were here,” Williams said.

At one point it was Country Maid Dairy, and Williams said they helped supply metropolitan schools with milk. Now, instead of cattle, auction signs are set up in the pasture.

Alexandra Koehn

auction sign

After the death of the owners, the Thompson couple, their family decided to auction over a hundred acres.

“They’re trying to strike a sort of balance between selling to the highest bidder — a Chicago developer — and having 5-acre parcels that locals can have a mini-farm on,” Williams said.

The property has been divided into 18 rooms.

“I think we’re in an ideal situation of what all the development rules mean in Nashville, where we can maintain the rural character but also support the ever-increasing demand for housing in Davidson County,” Williams said.

She hopes the pre-war house will be saved. There are approximately 10 historic homes within 5 miles of the farm.

“Everyone understands that development is coming and they have to get there, but to preserve the history of Nashville and the character of Nashville – what makes us Nashville – we have to be careful how we approach those opportunities,” said Williams.

The auction is at 11 a.m. Saturday on Dry Fork Road. Learn more details here.

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Review of the book Horse by Geraldine Brooks https://chattahoocheetrace.com/review-of-the-book-horse-by-geraldine-brooks/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:15:41 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/review-of-the-book-horse-by-geraldine-brooks/ Placeholder while loading article actions In 2019, an art history doctoral student rescues an oil painting of a racing horse from a pile of junk on a Georgetown sidewalk, and a zoologist finds a skeleton marked “Horse.” in an attic of the Smithsonian. In 1850, an enslaved boy witnesses the birth of a foal. These […]]]>
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In 2019, an art history doctoral student rescues an oil painting of a racing horse from a pile of junk on a Georgetown sidewalk, and a zoologist finds a skeleton marked “Horse.” in an attic of the Smithsonian. In 1850, an enslaved boy witnesses the birth of a foal. These are the ingredients with which Geraldine Brooks begins her new novel, “Horse,” and, my goodness, they are just as alluring as her smooth, masterful storytelling.

From the outset, the storyline is clear: it’s no surprise that the horse in the painting is the same animal whose bones gather dust in the Smithsonian and the same as the newborn foal who will find a devoted companion. and for life in the boy, Shank. The horse’s name is Lexington, and he was a true racehorse who won six of his seven starts and became a legendary thoroughbred stallion whose offspring dominated American racing in the late 19th century. Brooks includes other characters in the story: the various owners of Lexington; Thomas J. Scott, a Pennsylvania-born wildlife painter who served in the Union Army during the Civil War; and modernist art dealer Martha Jackson. But the central characters of Brooks – Jarret; the art historian Theo; and the zoologist Jess — are invented.

Geraldine Brooks reimagines the life of King David in ‘The Secret Chord’

Jarret is the child of Harry Lewis, a horse trainer who was able to purchase his own freedom in prewar Kentucky. Harry’s employer, Dr Elisha Warfield, offers to give the colt Lexington to Harry in lieu of a year’s salary so that Harry, if he makes the horse a success, can earn enough to buy his son. This case turns out to be too good to be true. Once Lexington wins his first race, Harry’s ownership gives greedy white riders the leverage to take the animal from him. It turns out there is a law prohibiting black people from racing horses, and so Dr. Warfield is being blackmailed into selling out both Lexington and Jarret. The young man and horse are sent south, eventually to Richard Ten Broeck’s massive racing operation in Louisiana. Of course, the abhorrent and absurd truth is that Lexington and Shank are considered cattle, resources to be exploited until they die. Ten Broeck recognizes the value of Jarret’s skill with horses and his deep relationship with Lexington and, in what might be mistaken for generosity but is really just cunning exploitation, elevates him to the status of assistant coach, a promotion that gives Jarret responsibilities without real authority.

A century and a half later, Theo and Jess are reunited by the remains of Lexington: his portrait, his bones. Theo, who is black, is the child of diplomats, a Nigerian mother and an American father. He grew up in British boarding schools and was a polo star at Oxford before the indignities of racism – from which privilege could not isolate him – drove him from the sport. His interest in horse portraiture is at first casual, then sharpens as he focuses on the presence of black men in similar works of the time – grooms and trainers – who may have been reduced in slavery. Jess is white, Australian and a funny duck, fascinated since childhood by the bones of living beings. The two begin a tentative relationship, their attraction to each other struggling alongside Jess’s tendency towards unconscious micro-aggression and Theo’s doubts about his ability to fully understand his experience as a black man.

The 23 most unforgettable last sentences in fiction

Jarret’s story is one of individualism. His stubborn self-improvement and tenacious devotion to Lexington serve as a private rebellion against the obliteration that is slavery. Ultimately, the war determines his fate, but in unpredictable ways. Theo and Jess are also at the mercy of their time, but progress is a complicated proposition. The resolution to their story is saturated with the same rot of injustice that was brought to this country with slavery and has flourished ever since. In “Horse,” Brooks, who is a meticulous researcher and whose previous novels including “People of the Book” “Caleb’s Crossing” and Pulitzer Prize-winning “March” have all been concerned with the past, writes about our present in such a way that the tangled roots of the story, just beneath the story, are both subtle and unmistakable.

The prevailing feeling is that the more things change, the more they stay the same. Horses were cruelly used and shunned by the pre-war horse racing industry; the same goes for modern races. Enslaved men were considered inherently dangerous and were murdered without consequence at white whims; police kill blacks with impunity even today. Artist Thomas J. Scott, initially sympathetic to Confederate prisoners, eventually gave up talking to them because they were “lost by a narrative unrelated to anything he recognized as true. Their mad conception of Mr. Lincoln as some sort of descendant of the cloven-hoofed devil, their utter disregard – denial – of the humanity of slaves, their fabulous notions of the evils the federal government intended for them if their cause failed – all this was so deeply rooted, beyond the scope of dialogue or reasonable proof. If this doesn’t sound familiar, you haven’t been on the internet lately.

Maggie Shipstead’s ‘Great Circle’ is a rising work of historical fiction and a perfect summer romance

I raced through the first half of the novel, then slowed and slowed as I went, so worried about what might happen to Jarret and Theo and Lexington that I could barely bear to the knowledge. “Horse” is not a dark book, but it made me very angry at times, and it made me cry. “Horse” is a reminder of the simple, primal power a writer can invoke by creating characters that readers care about and telling a story about them – the same power that so terrifies the people who are so desperately trying to get Toni Morrison banned from the their children’s reading lists.

Maggie Shipstead is the author of ‘Seating Arrangements’, ‘Astonish Me’, ‘The Great Circle’ and ‘You Have a Friend in 10A’.

A note to our readers

We participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to allow us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliate sites.

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Atlanta, Georgia 2020 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/atlanta-georgia-2020/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:24:14 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/atlanta-georgia-2020/ Once a humble stop along the Western, Georgia and Atlantic railroads, Atlanta has become one of the fastest growing cities in the world – with a metropolitan area expanding faster than any other in America. It is noted for being the first of the first American cities to be set up in a location chosen […]]]>

Once a humble stop along the Western, Georgia and Atlantic railroads, Atlanta has become one of the fastest growing cities in the world – with a metropolitan area expanding faster than any other in America. It is noted for being the first of the first American cities to be set up in a location chosen with consideration for the growth of the transportation industry rather than convenient access to a water source which was the standard prerequisite. . The city has held the title of Georgia’s capital since 1868 and serves as the county seat of Fulton County. Atlanta played a crucial role in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, with students from the city’s collection of black colleges rallying behind famous historical figures like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and earned the city a reputation for constant social progress.

Atlanta Geography

View of Atlanta, Georgia.

Atlanta is located north/northeast of the Georgian cities of Augusta, Macon, Albany, and Valdosta. The metropolitan periphery of Atlanta comprises 20 counties, including Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, and Rockdale counties. The city has a higher elevation than any other east of Denver, sitting on a ridge at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains and slightly southeast of the Chattahoochee River. The Eastern Continental Divide—a natural hydrographic boundary separating runoff from the Gulf of Mexico to the north or the Atlantic Ocean to the south—runs through Atlanta. As it is a ridge of land with constant elevation levels, this continental divide was the ideal location for the placement of the railroads responsible for the settlement of Atlanta in the 19th century.

Climate

According to tourist reviews, the best time of year to visit Atlanta is between early May and mid-June, or between late August and mid-October. Atlanta’s summers are known to be hot and humid, for about four months of the year – from late May to mid-September. The average daily high during this time of year is over 81°F, and in July – the hottest month – temperatures push the daily average to 88°F. Precipitation levels are quite high in Georgia and Atlanta experience an average of 4.7 inches of precipitation in March and July (the wettest months of the year). Atlanta’s climate is characterized as humid subtropical, and as such the winters are wet but relatively mild. The cold season is said to last about three months, from late November to late February. There is a wide variation in temperature throughout these months, with an average high of 53°F, an average low of 35°F, and in January – the coldest month – an average daily temperature of 45°F . The sudden drops in temperature experienced by Atlanta are the result of cold air blowing into the region from Canada.

Atlanta Demographics and Economy

Children play at Centennial Olympic Park
Children play at Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta.

The most recent population count for the city of Atlanta was 490,642 people. Atlanta is one of only 7 US cities with a higher population of residents who identify as black than those who fall into the racial categories of white, Asian, Native American or “other”. Detroit, Memphis, Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia complete this shortlist. The racial makeup of Atlanta is approximately 50% Black or African American, 40% White (non-Hispanic), 5% Asian (non-Hispanic), 3% White (Hispanic), and 2% Métis (non-Hispanic). The median household income in Atlanta is $66,657. Atlanta’s population and economy have grown significantly in recent years. Atlanta’s wage distribution is also increasingly even, and levels of income inequality are below the nation’s national average, with men earning 1.36 times more than women in full-time positions.

Atlanta History

Georgia State Capitol
The Georgia State Capitol building in Atlanta.

Northwest Georgia is recognized as having been occupied by the native Creek and Cherokee tribes prior to the arrival of European settlers. The forced displacement of these peoples by the federal government facilitated settlement, while the discovery of gold in the area and the ease of access offered by the many transportation routes to and from the city further attracted American settlers. The first name used for the community of people who would one day evolve into bustling Atlanta was Terminus, meaning “end of the line”, and it was located exactly where the Western & Atlantic Railroad was to meet the Georgian Railway. Railroad that ran steadily westward in 1837. The city’s name was changed to Marthasville in 1843 and again in 1845 when it was officially named Atlanta.

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Atlanta had a population of 8,000. After the war, the Freedman’s Bureau, an organization intended to help African Americans transition from slavery to life as free citizens, was established and operated until 1870, successfully orchestrating the establishment of the University of Atlanta in 1865 and Clark College in 1869. These institutions helped cultivate the racial diversity for which Atlanta is known today.

Attractions in Atlanta

Hot Air Balloon Festival in Piedmont Park, Alaska
Hot Air Balloon Festival in Piedmont Park, Atlanta.

More than 200 acres of land in Atlanta are dedicated to Piedmont Park, which includes playgrounds, tennis courts, dog parks, picnic facilities, a public swimming pool, walking and biking trails, and a market. farmer every Saturday. Annual celebrations like the Atlanta Ice Cream Festival, Atlanta Dogwood Festival, Atlanta Jazz Festival, and Atlanta Pride are all held here. Piedmont Park is located right next to the impressive Atlanta Botanical Garden, making it the perfect destination for an afternoon of leisure activities.

More than a museum, the Atlanta History Center is 13 hectares of immersive exhibits and historic homes. In the middle of this historic center is the Atlanta History Museum, dedicated to telling the story of the area’s first native inhabitants through the Antebellum era. Not far from the museum is Smith Farm, Atlanta’s oldest farm, now used to educate people by recreating the conditions and experiences of enslaved Africans on the plantations of South America. The farm is made up of multiple historical outbuildings, decorated with sheep, goats, chickens, and an authentic slave vegetable garden.

Georgia’s capital has grown steadily since its founding, and recent years are no exception. Creativity is bubbling in Atlanta, and many city streets are decorated with art exhibits by local artists. It has been dubbed the “city in a forest” because about 48% of the city is covered in trees thanks to the 100,000 trees planted by the non-profit organization “Trees Atlanta”. Atlanta’s emblem of a phoenix rising from the ashes is a commemoration of the city’s burning, orchestrated as an act of war in 1864 and leaving only 400 buildings standing, but it could also be interpreted as a metaphor : from the dark history of a southern state rose a prolific, diverse and passionate city.

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Thousands of Raleigh Freed Slaves Built the First Freedmen’s Villages :: WRAL.com https://chattahoocheetrace.com/thousands-of-raleigh-freed-slaves-built-the-first-freedmens-villages-wral-com/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/thousands-of-raleigh-freed-slaves-built-the-first-freedmens-villages-wral-com/ By Heather Leah, WRAL Multiplatform Producer Raleigh, North Carolina — Filled with modern cafes, restaurants and trendy boutiques, it can be hard to imagine a time when downtown Raleigh was instead filled with sprawling fields, plantation homes – and hundreds of shrunken individuals in slavery. Instead of busy roads and breweries, much of what now […]]]>

— Filled with modern cafes, restaurants and trendy boutiques, it can be hard to imagine a time when downtown Raleigh was instead filled with sprawling fields, plantation homes – and hundreds of shrunken individuals in slavery.

Instead of busy roads and breweries, much of what now comprises downtown was rural – including plantations like Spring Hill, Mordecai, Lane, Devereux, Haywood, Cameron and others.

When emancipation finally came to Raleigh, thousands of suddenly freed men and women poured in from these plantations and into the surrounding city. Most had no money, no home, no formal education. There were no churches, schools, or medical facilities to serve the once-enslaved population. How did a generation of liberated families build a life out of nothing?

“African Americans, after slavery, decided to come together and build, brick by brick, a community and a sense of belonging that allowed them to thrive,” says Grady Bussey, director of the John Chavis Center. Memorial Park.

Within a generation of freedom, Raleigh’s African-American community had built several neighborhoods known as Freedmen’s Villages. There were thriving businesses, government leaders, universities, hospitals and churches.

What happened to the 13 Freedman Villages of Raleigh?

Juneteenth in Raleigh: the beginnings of emancipation

Imagine the first moment of freedom: What was the first thing the enslaved men and women of Raleigh did when they learned they were free?

Raleigh historians say some probably left the plantation, just because they could. Many probably celebrated, while others were in shock.

“Think of someone coming up to you and telling you that everything you’ve known in your life just changed,” Bussey explains. “You are a full person. You are a descendant now. You have a full name now. You have the ability and the right to do things that you didn’t have yesterday.”

Joel Lane House Museum

Bussey asks, “How do people learn to be someone new overnight?”

He says some, who probably struggled with the sudden change, stayed on the plantations they had always known and started working as sharecroppers. Others, who had seen family members sold to distant plantations, began planning long journeys to find their lost loved ones.

Some, however, began the community work of building their new homes in freedom – establishing freedmen’s villages like the village of Oberlin and 12 other neighborhoods in the east and south parts of Raleigh. Even today, some of this historic segregation can be seen in Southeast Raleigh’s history.

The Duncan Cameron Plantation.  Image courtesy of the North Carolina State Archives.

Freedmen’s Villages: Building a community from the ground up

The land which now comprises the Village District (formerly Cameron Village) was once a pre-war plantation owned by Duncan Cameron. Cameron is known to have had one of the largest slave operations in the state. His plantation mansion is long gone today, but a file photo gives some insight into what the area looked like.

“The plantations were self-sufficient,” Bussey said. “They had stores and cemeteries, meeting places for the church.”

When hundreds of people were suddenly free to leave Cameron’s plantation, they had to find a way to earn money and find land to settle.

The village of Oberlin was built on land subdivided by white landowners and sold to newly freed African Americans, according to research done by Ruth Little for the historical research report for the designation of the village of Oberlin.

“White merchant and entrepreneur Lewis W. Peck is the first known landowner to sell lots to African Americans,” she wrote.

The villages received several derogatory names from the surrounding public: names like “Save-Rent” or “Slab Town” to invoke a sense of “cheapness”. Eventually, however, the community would take on the name of Oberlin Village.

History of the village of Oberlin

James Harris is often associated with the name Oberlin. One of Wake County’s leading black politicians, he was born in Granville County while still a slave. He won his freedom and traveled to Ohio, where he studied at Oberlin College, then moved on to help people escape slavery. Oberlin College was an abolitionist college that not only accepted black students, but allowed them to come to campus and enroll.

For a community of newly freed slaves, the name Oberlin would have represented the freedom to gain an education and build one’s own life – to be uplifted.

“During the 1870s, the pioneers of Oberlin established essential institutions for an independent community – two churches, a cemetery, and a school,” Little wrote.

Many inhabitants of the village of Oberlin over the generations have become leaders in the community. James Shepard, for example, founded the college that would become North Carolina Central University. Joe Holt was the first black student to challenge school segregation in Raleigh after Brown vs. the Board of Education.

Just down the street, the students themselves have built a hospital for the African American community. Stone by stone, these young people dug rocks from the ground itself and built St. Agnes, a hospital for Raleigh’s African-American community.

St. Agnes Hospital in downtown Raleigh

Linda Dallas, a professor at St. Augustine University, calls the hospital “a symbol of coming out of nowhere.”

Bussey points out that the idea of ​​building churches, homes and hospitals from scratch may sound unbelievable by today’s standards – but, he says, “These people had no other choice. They had to work together and make something out of nothing. That’s part of the resilience of the African-American experience.”

Emancipation Day: First African-American holiday celebrated in Raleigh

Juneteenth was originally primarily celebrated in Texas; however, the African-American community in Raleigh and many other southern cities celebrated a holiday called “Emancipation Day”.

Emancipation Day was observed on January 1, the date on which the Emancipation Proclamation was originally signed – although true emancipation did not come to a Confederate state until occupied by Union troops.

The Raleigh community began celebrating the holiday in 1870, according to Preservation NC President Myrick Howard.

“It became a big deal. It started with a parade. People came from their respective neighborhoods and churches in downtown Raleigh. There were choirs. It became a big gathering with speakers, poetry, music,” he says.

Each year, the African-American community would come together and create resolutions about what it felt its citizens needed to do to grow and flourish in Raleigh.

“Sometimes they would set lofty goals; other times they would reflect on the past,” says Howard.

First days of freedom: Thousands of freed slaves in Raleigh built the first freedmen's villages

Willis Graves, a prominent member of the village of Oberlin, whose home still houses the offices of Preservation NC today, was the chairman of Emancipation Day celebrations from 1899 until about a decade later.

The first official day of Graves’ emancipation as president came just weeks after the Wilmington Massacre, in which many members of Wilmington’s African-American community were massacred.

“It was a very thoughtful year,” says Howard.

Emancipation Day was set on a deeply symbolic date – January 1 reflecting some of the best and worst experiences for enslaved men and women.

“It’s a double whammy,” says Howard. “January 1 was the date the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. However, it was also the day in each year that slaves were generally sold.”

January 1 was a day of freedom, as well as a day of despair.

“It was market day. The day they were sold or hired out. Where a white man could buy the services of a slave for a year,” Howard explains.

A historical marker honors the black reverend who preserved the history of the Wilmington Massacre

After emancipation, it was considered a powerful thing – being able to celebrate and plan for the future on what was once the worst day of the year.

Emancipation Day ended, according to Howard, around the 1920s. Affected by both the Great Depression and the Great Migration, when many members of the Graves family – who hosted the celebrations locally – left Raleigh. Lemuel Graves, the son of Willis Graves, had succeeded his father as president. However, he eventually moved to Harlem, New York.

Juneteenth in Raleigh: Then vs. Now

Emancipation was just the beginning. Jim Crow laws, red line practices, and segregation continued to push against the African American community. Of Raleigh’s original 13 freedmen’s villages, only two remain today: Oberlin and Method. The rest have been wiped off the map.

What happened to the 13 Freedman Villages of Raleigh?

Despite its growth and success, even the historic village of Oberlin has suffered a lot of loss. From the late 1940s through the 1960s, the development of “Cameron Village” and Wade Avenue drove out families and impacted quality of life “in the name of urban renewal,” according to Little’s research. Similar communities, such as Hayti in Durham, which became so successful it became known as “Black Wall Street”, found themselves disappearing under new developments and freeways.

Since those early days of emancipation, the celebration of Juneteenth has faded into history for much of the United States. In 2021, Congress passed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act, making it a federal holiday. This year there are dozens of June 19 events, tours, commemorations and exhibits across the Triangle, working to highlight the stories of the many unnamed men and women who have spent their lives in slavery – but built much of Raleigh’s foundation.

Jonathan Olu-Taylor, Djembe Drummer, opens Dix Park's Juneteenth event with a celebratory song.  Photo taken June 19, 2021.

WRAL News has been working to compile a list of June 19 events in the Triangle. This year, thousands of people across the Triangle are expected to celebrate, commemorate and learn about history.

“The American experience is extraordinary. It’s royal. It’s unique. And the African-American experience is intertwined with the American experience,” Bussey says. “It’s worth learning everything the dynamic that accompanies the American experience.”

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Gardener Magazine + Landmarks Register + ‘America’: VA/DC Wow Houses https://chattahoocheetrace.com/gardener-magazine-landmarks-register-america-va-dc-wow-houses/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:44:45 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/gardener-magazine-landmarks-register-america-va-dc-wow-houses/ VIRGINIA/DC – This week’s featured homes in Virginia and DC include a 19th-century estate in the Fredericksburg area listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register and a Falls Church-area home featured in a recent issue of V The estate near Fredericksburg, called Lavue for its view of three different counties, was built over 200 years ago. […]]]>

VIRGINIA/DC – This week’s featured homes in Virginia and DC include a 19th-century estate in the Fredericksburg area listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register and a Falls Church-area home featured in a recent issue of V

The estate near Fredericksburg, called Lavue for its view of three different counties, was built over 200 years ago. Built in 1818 by George Alsop, Lavue and its surrounding 60 acres are impeccably maintained. The location is private but very close to the shops of Cosner’s Corner, VRE station and Spotsylvania Hospital.

A completely remodeled home, located just outside the Falls Town Church, has additions designed by renowned architectural firm DuBro Architects + Builders. The house was featured in the May 2016 issue of Virginia Gardener magazine.

In Arlington, a big Home Sears & Roebuck — the Americus model — built in 1925 has been updated with many modern conveniences. The house is ideal for big Thanksgiving dinners, rocking on the porch, summer parties in the garden, snuggling up with a book on the window seat.

Patch has assembled a collection of beautiful homes currently on the market in DC, Northern Virginia and Fredericksburg. You can find property photo galleries in the linked listings in each article.

Lavue, a 200-year-old estate near Fredericksburg with 60 acres

A 19th century estate in the Fredericksburg area is now up for sale. The house, which features an Antebellum style, is situated on 60 acres. The estate, called Lavue for its view of three different counties, is listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register. The house was built over 200 years ago in 1818. In total, the house has five bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms.

Falls Church Home Featured in Virginia Gardener Magazine

This fabulous, completely remodeled home, located just outside of the Church in the town of Falls, is the gem of a home you’ve been waiting for. In addition to a complete renovation, the home features additions by renowned architectural firm DuBro Architects + Builders. The house has been optimized for maximum use of space, comfort and beauty. The house was featured in the May 2016 issue of Virginia Gardener magazine.

Incredible style awaits you in this 2 bedroom Capital Hill loft

This beautiful Capitol Hill loft features 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths and over 2,200 square feet of living space with custom finishes designed for stylish living and entertaining. The main living space features 18 foot high ceilings and an abundance of natural light.

Why not join the Horsey set in Herndon with this one of a kind home?

This one-of-a-kind home in Herndon is situated on a total of 1.09 acres in a unique equestrian community. This custom built home is minutes from all amenities yet in an incredibly peaceful and idyllic setting in the community of Moneys Corner. You’ll want to be home all the time, and you’ll have the space and the views to enjoy it! This property is sold with an additional half acre building lot located between the house and the community lake.

Sears Kit House for sale in the Cherrydale neighborhood of Arlington

This large 1925 Arts and Crafts style home offers many modern conveniences. The house, located in the Cherrydale area, is a Sears & Roebuck house, the Americus model. The house is ideal for big Thanksgiving dinners, rocking out on the porch, and summer parties in the backyard. A separate area at the back includes three bedrooms and 1.5 bathrooms. Ideal for a professional home office, artist studio or guest house.

Relax on the wraparound porch of this $2.2 million log cabin in Leesburg

A custom built log cabin is now available for purchase in Leesburg. The unique home has tons of rustic charm with features like a stained glass door and a private pond. The home has four bedrooms, four and a half bathrooms and 11 acres. The house features post and beam construction along exposed timber supports. The wooden accents give the house an extra rustic charm.

Brick-fronted colonial for sale in Port Potomac from Woodbridge

A brick-fronted colonial in the Port Potomac community of Woodbridge is now up for sale. In total, the home has five bedrooms, five and a half bathrooms, and 5,500 square feet. The property is listed for $875,000. In addition to its five main bedrooms, the house also has two additional bonus bedrooms in the basement. The house has three bathrooms adjoining its bedrooms.

Own one of the “four sisters” Victorian townhouses in Alexandria

This Victorian townhouse, known as one of the “Four Sisters”, is up for sale in Old Town Alexandria. The two-bedroom home was built in 1900 while offering updates like two remodeled full bathrooms. The main level offers pine flooring, a fireplace, a chef’s kitchen and a dining room with a view of the garden. The upper level includes two bedrooms, a library and a family room with a fireplace.

More Featured Homes

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“Let Them Eat Cake” | Chicago Classic Magazine https://chattahoocheetrace.com/let-them-eat-cake-chicago-classic-magazine/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 17:55:35 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/let-them-eat-cake-chicago-classic-magazine/ X Do you have a Jill cake pan? No, I only have a springform pan. Hmmmmm… No, it’s not okay, said my friend. Telling another friend about the request, she said not having a cake pan was UN-AMERICAN. Oh no! So, I bought the 6 inch round pans for a three layer cake. LOTS, LOTS […]]]>

X

Do you have a Jill cake pan?

No, I only have a springform pan.

Hmmmmm… No, it’s not okay, said my friend.

Telling another friend about the request, she said not having a cake pan was UN-AMERICAN. Oh no!

So, I bought the 6 inch round pans for a three layer cake. LOTS, LOTS of hours later, and a sink full of all the baking supplies, the lemon poppyseed cake was ready. Delicious yes….. but honestly, bakeries and cake shops have amazing cakes, and we have so many sources of cakes in Chicago!

I will not repeat to make another cake.

But even though I don’t bake cakes, many do, and many decorate in exquisite detail with such imagination and flair.

Everywhere, cakes are made with personal interests represented, sports memorabilia, family events. Truly, the range of skill and ingenuity is astonishing, not to mention the extreme attention to detail and care, particularly impressive when using materials as volatile and unstable as frosting and pipe decorating.

One such superb example depicting an illuminated manuscript was for the Edible Book April Fool’s Day Tea at the Columbia College Book and Paper Center a few years ago. It was designed, baked and decorated Susanna Leonard Hanesformer president of Caxton club.org.

Image: Courtesy of Susan Leonard Hanes, Chicago

Origin of “Let Them Eat Cake”?

Usually attributed to Marie Antoinette but there are dissenters to this notion, citing no evidence that Marie Antoinette ever said that. But we know people attribute to him the phrase “Let them eat brioche” for almost two hundred years – and debunking it for just as long.

Apparently the Romans baked birthday cakes.

Children’s birthday parties originated in Germany, with the 18c. Kinderfeste like a party for a child.

Put candles on cakes was a Greek invention. Devotees brought moon-shaped cakes to the temple of Artemis: the goddess of the moon and the hunt, with candles to make them shine like the moon.

We use cakes for everything and all celebrations: Wedding, Graduation, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Gender Reveal, Bar and Bat Mitzvah, Christmas, Eid Mubarek after Ramadan, Birthday and Farewell. In addition, different countries have bakeries with their specialties.

What’s about to grab the nation’s attention after Father’s Day? The 4th of July and the painting is superb.

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Flag cake toppers say it all

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“Borani” flag cake: variation of an Iranian dish made with strained yogurt or labneh

Image courtesy Justine Balin

Image courtesy Justine Balin

ORIGINS OF EXPRESSIONS

“you can’t have your cake and eat it too”

Comes from the oldest known use of the proverb in a letter from Thomas, Duke of Norfolk to Thomas Cromwell in 1538. In British English, the last word is often omitted from the proverb, as you cannot have your cake and eat it. or like James Joyce quoted “You can’t eat your cake and have it.”

AND how about the origins of “cake walk” and “A piece of cake“to connote easy, and”It takes the cake“- to receive the highest honor in a situation, although often used sarcastically.

The cake walk was originally a 19th century dance, invented by African Americans in the antebellum South. It was intended to satirize the stiff ballroom walks of white plantation owners, who favored the rigidly formal dances of European high society.

After emancipation, the pageant tradition continued in black communities; the Oxford English Dictionary dates the widespread adoption of “cakewalk” to the late 1870s. It was around this time that cakewalk came to mean “easy” – not because the dance was particularly simple to do , but rather because of its languid pace and association with weekend leisure.

cake walk the contests also resulted in two other well-worn shots – “That take it cake!” and “A piece of cake.” This last phrase, which also means easy, is believed to have first been used in print by comedian Ogden Nash in The Primrose Path. around 1935.

also the origin of A piece of cake is also assigned to the Royal Air Force in the late 1930s for an easy mission, but really its use in the 1930s cannot deny the origin of cake walk in the pre-war south.

Hey, even ACCELERATE use the term
“a piece of cake.”

Cakes for all occasions – so beautifully decorated!

“Because the sweeter the cake, the more bitter the jelly can be.” Lady Gaga

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Simnel Easter cake: rich fruit cake topped with marzipan popular in the UK
For more reference on fruitcakes, read Elizabeth Richter’s article in
December 4 issue of this magazine.
“Ah fruitcake! Love it, hate it, bake it”

Ramadan and Eid festive food: Golden cake with a crescent moon
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It has been said that the Opera cake was unveiled at Paris Culinary Fair 1903 by the famous patisserie Chef Louis Clichy.

The opera cake is made of layers of almond sponge cake soaked in coffee syrup, covered with ganache and coffee buttercream and covered with chocolate ganache. Symphony is Frederic’s version of this French classic. Frederic Loraschi

“A party without cake is really just a meeting” Julia Child

A Bordeaux canelé is a small rum and vanilla flavored French pastry with a sweet and tender custard center and a thick dark caramelized crust. It takes the form of a small ridged cylinder up to five centimeters high with a depression at the top. Image of Verzenay at Green City Market, Lincoln Park Chicago

THE REVELATION CAKE – is it something new in the last 30 years?

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AGE & BIRTHDAY related cakes

Cakes for children with special needs

Non-profit organizations providing cakes are available. Most use volunteers to bake the cakes.

Criteria for hiring volunteers, naming recipients and requesting cakes are on each site

Learned cakes contribute to Angel Cake in Australia, Cake Angels aims to make birthdays and other important events for seriously ill children even more special, by donating custom-designed celebration cakes in a theme that is personalized and meaningful to them.
Cake4Kids serves at-risk and underserved youth

Cake4Kids partners with agencies that support young people (ages 1-24) at risk or underserved, including youth in foster care, group homes, homeless shelters, housing transitional and low-income, shelters from domestic violence or human trafficking, substance abuse programs, and refugees.

Children remain incredibly resilient even in the worst of circumstances, but often suffer from self-esteem issues and withdraw into themselves. At Cake4Kids, our goal is to show them we care and boost their self-esteem by giving them a smile on their birthday.

Glaze of smiles is a non-profit organization that provides personalized birthday cakes to affected families

For goodness cakes

For Goodness Cakes matches volunteers to make and hand-deliver birthday cakes to foster children and at-risk youth on their special day.

“A person may no longer want their cake; but that’s no reason to give it away.

– Victor Hugo, Les Miserables

Lambton cake is an Australian dessert of sponge cake, or squares of sponge cake dipped in chocolate, then rolled in coconut. The word lamington means layers of beaten gold.

WEDDING CAKES so many variations

“The most dangerous food is the wedding cake.”James Thurber

Wedding cakes can be tiered cupcakes or even amuse bouche – choux pastry puffs stacked in a cone and bound with caramel threads.

Cheese Wheels wedding cakes are all the rage right now.

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Image: Courtesy Sally Ellick

“Nothing in life is a piece of cake; well, except a real piece of cake.

Hiba Fatima Ahmad

Notes, references and sources
Image of Jill: Joe Mazza Bravelux Inc.
Unattributed photos – copyright © 2022 Jill Lowe. All rights reserved
Bridal magazine. UK
Marriageomania
Othello Australia Cheesecake Wedding Cake Gallery
Fine Cheers UK Wedding Cake Gallery
Chicago Cakes
San Francisco Cheese School
Real Cheese Wedding Cake at Cheese Maven Chicago
North Shoer Chicago Kosher Bakery
Verzenay Patisserie Chicago
Vanilla Pastry Chicago
bittersweet chicago
Sweet Mandy B’s
Bake Chicago
Bjorn Chicago
Alliance Bakery Chicago
Cocoa Eve Chicago
Chicago Stones Bakery
Bridgeport Bakery
Caxton club.org
Frederic Loraschi
The new house
sugar lover
Cakes 4 Children
Glaze of smiles
For God’s sake
European pastry

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Laura T. Murphy’s Critique of Azadnagar—The Story of a 21st-Century Slave Revolt: The Meaning of Nonviolence in an Age of Oppression https://chattahoocheetrace.com/laura-t-murphys-critique-of-azadnagar-the-story-of-a-21st-century-slave-revolt-the-meaning-of-nonviolence-in-an-age-of-oppression/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 06:22:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/laura-t-murphys-critique-of-azadnagar-the-story-of-a-21st-century-slave-revolt-the-meaning-of-nonviolence-in-an-age-of-oppression/ Shining the spotlight on the central Indian hinterland where tribal communities trapped in intergenerational slavery are taking matters into their own hands Shining the spotlight on the central Indian hinterland where tribal communities trapped in intergenerational slavery are taking matters into their own hands Democracy is not meant to be compatible with slavery. The first […]]]>

Shining the spotlight on the central Indian hinterland where tribal communities trapped in intergenerational slavery are taking matters into their own hands

Shining the spotlight on the central Indian hinterland where tribal communities trapped in intergenerational slavery are taking matters into their own hands

Democracy is not meant to be compatible with slavery. The first institutionalizes equality and non-violent social relations while the second enforces inequality through violence. Yet, according to the Global Slavery Index, of the 40 million people who are in slavery, almost 8 million live in India – more than in any other country. Who are these Indian slaves? Did no one tell them – the slaves or their masters – that India is the biggest democracy in the world?

Well, pre-war America demonstrated that slavery could go along with democracy. In India, too, slavery-like exploitation flourished alongside constitutional proclamations of equality, nowhere more so than in the central Indian hinterland where tribals dispossessed of their forest lands often end up in servitude. for debts “belonging” to the local owners.

The history of the Kols

In Azad Nagar: the story of a 21st century slave revolt, Laura T. Murphy, modern slavery expert, tells the story of one such group of enslaved workers from the Kol tribal community in Uttar Pradesh who got rid of intergenerational slavery and started their own micro-village , christened Azad Nagar . They achieve this with the help of Sankalp, a grassroots NGO, which helps them raise funds to buy their own mining lease. The Kols, who now earn cash, unlike the meager amounts of grain they used to receive, are even starting to send their children to school. But is emancipation sustainable when the structures of oppression remain intact?

Murphy describes Azad Nagar as “a small cluster of thatched-roof houses on one of the most desolate stretches of land in the larger village of Sonbarsa”. For their former masters, the Patel owners, even this bit of autonomy is unpleasant. They fight back. But the Kols were undeterred and in June 2000 they organized a “hullabol”, or protest meeting, where a landlord died. Several Kols are imprisoned for murder.

But after a few years, they are released after a court calls the death an “accident”. Kol’s men return to Azad Nagar, life goes on and gradually gets worse. The Kols’ quarrying license is never renewed. Large corporations with industrial machinery are laying bare the quarries and rushing in. They leave behind environmental degradation that ruins the health and livelihoods of tribal peoples, putting a question mark over the very meaning of words like ’emancipation’ and ‘revolution’. What do they mean when you are “free” but the deprivation continues?

Intrigued by The Silent Revolution: Sankalp and the Quarry Slaves (2006), documentary film produced by an NGO on the revolt of Azad Nagar, Murphy travels to India to meet the protagonists of Kol. During her conversations, she is stunned to hear a female Kol speak proudly of the murder of a landlord – this is a direct contradiction to the accepted narrative, amplified by the documentary, of a “non-violent revolution”. Murphy questions the reflective writing of violent acts of resistance from stories of emancipation intended for mainstream consumption. The contrast to how the emancipated—in this case, the Kol tribes—view their own struggle is stark, leading Murphy to ponder the politics of nonviolence.

Insufficient memory

In countries where the violence of oppressors is in the daily news – be it police excesses against black people or atrocities committed against Dalits and Adivasis – whose interests are served by erasing from public memory examples of revolutionary violence by the oppressed? Could it be that nothing is more terrifying — and therefore unspeakable — to masters than the violence of slaves?

Commenting on the ongoing threat of violence that envelops black bodies in a racist society, African-American author Ta-Nehisi Coates asked, “Why were only our heroes nonviolent? Why indeed. What does it mean when, in a society where the ruling elites are in symbiosis with the state, nonviolence is deemed particularly essential to the morality of the oppressed? These questions illuminate the context as well as the coda of Murphy’s narrative quest in this book.

Azadnagar: the story of a 21st century slave revolt; Laura T. Murphy, HarperCollins, ₹299.

sampath.g@thehindu.co.in

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The Hobbs Sisters to headline Friday After 5 | Features https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-hobbs-sisters-to-headline-friday-after-5-features/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-hobbs-sisters-to-headline-friday-after-5-features/ The third week of Friday After 5 will continue to feature entertainment and family events, with music and more on Friday nights. Nashville-based country duo The Hobbs Sisters will headline the Jagoe Homes Riverfront Live stage at the Holiday Inn Owensboro Riverfront from 6-9:30 p.m. alongside their backing band. Twin sisters Hannah and Lauren Hobbs, […]]]>

The third week of Friday After 5 will continue to feature entertainment and family events, with music and more on Friday nights.

Nashville-based country duo The Hobbs Sisters will headline the Jagoe Homes Riverfront Live stage at the Holiday Inn Owensboro Riverfront from 6-9:30 p.m. alongside their backing band.

Twin sisters Hannah and Lauren Hobbs, originally from Pittsburgh, traveled to Nashville more than four years ago and will debut in Owensboro and FA5.

“We are so thrilled,” Lauren Hobbs said of her performance at FA5. “We like being able to play in different places; it’s part of our job that makes it so much fun. We’ve heard so many (good) things about Friday After 5. We’re excited to be a part of it.

Lauren Hobbs said she and her sister performed regularly in the Pittsburgh area and had taken short trips to Nashville over the years, “playing everywhere we could get in” and “writing with anyone who was willing to write. with us”.

Their taste for experiences and the environment helped them decide to make Nashville their new home.

“We just fell in love with Nashville; it’s a great city for so many reasons, but especially if you’re a musician and you’re a budding songwriter and a budding artist,” said Lauren Hobbs. “It’s such an inspiring city, it’s a really welcoming city.”

Since arriving in Nashville, the group has kept busy with an active touring schedule and opened up to popular country artists, including Grammy-winning country band Lady A (formerly Lady Antebellum) and author -singer-songwriter Russell Dickerson.

The duo released their 10-track debut album “Turn It Up” last year, which Lauren Hobbs says will make up the bulk of their set list, along with other music they’ve been working on.

“We put on a very energetic show,” said Lauren Hobbs. “We’re still hoping that the energy and enthusiasm really trickles down to the audience.”

Other artists on the lineup include 8 Track’s 1970s rock and roll music from 7-9 p.m. on the Romain Subaru Overlook Stage, Derik Hultquist on the Lure Seafood & Grille Stage from 7-10 p.m., and Tony and the Tan Lines on stage. on the Ruoff Party Stage from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Station 696 will be hosting karaoke from 7:30 p.m. to midnight at their location, 311 W Veterans Blvd.

The Tailgate Band, originally scheduled to perform at the Atmos Energy Amphitheater at McConnell Plaza, will no longer be performing tonight due to a “family emergency”, according to the FA5 website.

Additionally, the first night of auditions for WBKR’s “Friday Night Fight” will take place from 6-8 p.m. on the Ruoff Party Stage. The competition will see a number of acts fight for a spot on the official FA5 lineup on September 2.

The second round of auditions will continue on July 15, with successful applicants from both rounds performing in the final on August 12, which will determine the winner.

The winning act will also receive $1,000.

Other events will include a dog and cat basket raffle and a petting zoo, honoring the week’s theme “We Love Pets”, as well as a hula hoop contest for all ages during the sunset intermission. Sun.

Tonight will also see the start of “First Fridays,” the contemporary Christian music concert series hosted by the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum, with Grammy-nominated all-female trio Point of Grace performing from 5-8 p.m. the outdoor stage of the Michael E. Horn Family Foundation behind the Hall of Fame.

Chris Joslin, executive director of the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum, said the facility was “very community-based” and wanted to be part of FA5 in some capacity.

“We wanted to develop something that complimented everything that was already happening with Friday After 5,” Joslin said. “We wanted to develop something that was perhaps unique and help broaden the audience for Friday After 5 in general.”

Joslin said the series was aimed at families, especially young families, while creating a “compelling and inviting” atmosphere, and its collaboration with First Baptist Owensboro to provide activities for young children.

With the genre of music featured on the show, Joslin feels he is focusing on his bluegrass and gospel music roots that the installation is all about while the songs’ messages are relatable.

“I think the human spirit… naturally goes to music, but especially songs of hope, songs of unity,” Joslin said. “I think that although our current culture is pulled and tied in many directions, I think the human spirit is kind of yearning for that reconciliation that can be found in Christ.”

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Who pays for the trips of the actors of “Real Housewives”? https://chattahoocheetrace.com/who-pays-for-the-trips-of-the-actors-of-real-housewives/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 18:18:53 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/who-pays-for-the-trips-of-the-actors-of-real-housewives/ During almost all seasons of The Real Housewives — from any city — the ladies are embarking on a fabulous vacation. But who really pays for these real housewives trips? The destinations are usually exotic, and the cast members usually stay in ultra-luxury homes or resorts filled with sweets, booze, and goodies to have a […]]]>

During almost all seasons of The Real Housewives — from any city — the ladies are embarking on a fabulous vacation. But who really pays for these real housewives trips?

The destinations are usually exotic, and the cast members usually stay in ultra-luxury homes or resorts filled with sweets, booze, and goodies to have a good time.

Travel seems extremely expensive, what about global destinations and private chefs, leaving many fans wondering: are the housewives paying the money for their trips or is Bravo picking up the bill?

Mega-producer Andy Cohen revealed the answer during a chat with OKAY! magazine.

“We do”, the Look what happens! the host said when asked who was paying real housewives casting trips. “Honestly, yes, yes. But you know, it depends on the holidays actually.”

Cohen explained that sometimes the production plans the trips, and sometimes the housewives do.

“Some were generated by us and some were generated by them. Women take vacation planning very seriously and so it’s on a case-by-case basis, but we paid for them, yes,” He shared.

In his book The Housewives: The Real Story Behind The Real Housewives, Housewives Expert Brian Moylan revealed that Bravo covered the cost of the vacation. The author also dove deep into the dynamics of travel.

“Every journey begins with the showrunner setting a budget,” he wrote, according to a snippet shared by Vulture. “It should be done for every trip, not just glamorous international vacations, but also little jaunts out of town, invitations to a housewife’s second home, or even a day trip to an orchard. apple trees in upstate New York for Sonja to piss in a corn maze.”

“In addition to the budget, producers must state why they are going on the trip, what stories they hope to pursue during their stay, and which of the women is the alleged host,” he continued in his book, according to the extract.

Moylan noted that the reason for the actors’ trips is to push the ladies out of their comfort zone, which in turn creates “a recipe for tensions to boil over and the drama to escalate to the next level”.

While most people probably prefer their vacation to be as drama-free as possible, reality TV is definitely a different breed. But that’s what makes it so fun to watch.

TV locations in every state

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