Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Thu, 03 Jun 2021 06:00:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Take a look at Star-City Sign Wars this week! https://chattahoocheetrace.com/take-a-look-at-star-city-sign-wars-this-week/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/take-a-look-at-star-city-sign-wars-this-week/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 14:30:43 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/take-a-look-at-star-city-sign-wars-this-week/ Coming into work earlier in the day, I was enjoying my fresh coffee and an incredible June morning in northern Maine. When I got to the north end of Main Street in Almost Isle, I noticed that the War of the Signs of a few weeks ago had taken a turn. The new message is […]]]>


Coming into work earlier in the day, I was enjoying my fresh coffee and an incredible June morning in northern Maine. When I got to the north end of Main Street in Almost Isle, I noticed that the War of the Signs of a few weeks ago had taken a turn.

The new message is consistent across all businesses. HELP! WE HIRE! In fact, I counted at least 13 companies on Main Street advertising for help. Almost every company that has a billboard that had a message begging people to apply for work. For those not taking a trip to downtown Presque Isle today, here is what you would see. We will be working from the north end of town to the south end.

You could work for the colonel

On the KFC storefront, there was another sign announcing an upcoming “hiring party”. What will it look like? Shall we interview and leave with a bucket of chicken?

Their neighbors at The Hut are looking for help.

Have you tried the new crinkle cut fries at Arbys? You could get some back at the end of your shift, I’m sure. Arbys tells you where to go online to apply.

Whether you’re an early riser or a night owl, our friends at Tim Horton can find the shift for you.

DOC needs a delivery driver!

Subway is looking for new members for its team every day.

Maybe working in the food industry is not for you. The O’Reilly guys could use a hand or two.

What about Portland glass? Believe me, this is not the job for me. It could be the right one for you.

Our buddy Ronny McDonlad could use a few more people to serve the long lunchtime queues.

$ 500 login bonus? This is the incentive offered by the Walgreens team.

The Sandwich Shop. A local business that offers a great meal!

Before you leave town, you can head over to Tractor Supply and see if you’ve got what they’re looking for.

As you can see, in Presque Isle there are plenty of job openings just like in most other areas of the state. Let’s see if we can get these signs to display different messages by the end of the summer.

The 16 counties of Maine ranked by how much money people make

Here is the list of all counties in Maine ranked by median household income from lowest to highest.

WATCH: TV Locations in Every State



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/take-a-look-at-star-city-sign-wars-this-week/feed/ 0
New Jersey apparently needs to improve its roller coaster game https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-jersey-apparently-needs-to-improve-its-roller-coaster-game/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-jersey-apparently-needs-to-improve-its-roller-coaster-game/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 08:00:41 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-jersey-apparently-needs-to-improve-its-roller-coaster-game/ New Jersey certainly has its share of roller coasters. According to several sources we have verified, there are currently around 30 or 40 roller coasters in the Garden State. The problem is, they’re not good enough, according to the authors and editors of 10best.com. The site evaluated the 10 best roller coasters, and there is […]]]>


New Jersey certainly has its share of roller coasters. According to several sources we have verified, there are currently around 30 or 40 roller coasters in the Garden State.

The problem is, they’re not good enough, according to the authors and editors of 10best.com. The site evaluated the 10 best roller coasters, and there is no entry from New Jersey to be found.

Overall, most of the sites we found indicate that most of the roller coaster is in California, followed by Florida, then a combination of Texas, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and from New Jersey.

Topping the Top 10 list is Steel Vengeance, a roller coaster that opened three years ago in Cedar Point, Ohio.

Number two on the list is Mako at Sea World in Orlando, and number three is the Phoenix at Knoebels Amusement Resort in Elysburg, PA.

Again, no New Jersey coaster made the list, which can be found here.

Of course, the list was released some time ago, and we anticipate that New Jersey’s newest coaster, the Jersey Devil Coaster, will open, literally, any day now at Great Adventure in Jackson. The Jersey Devil Coaster is, according to Great Adventure, the tallest, fastest, and longest single-rail roller coasters in the world.

So how does the Jersey Devil Coaster compare? Here’s a chance to check it out! Here’s a video of Steel Vengeance from Cedar Point:

Now take a look at Great Adventure’s Jersey Devil Coaster. This from a test recently carried out at the park. The merry-go-round was filled with “water people” for the test.

So what do you think? Will the Jersey Devil be part of the next Top 10?

Be sure to tune in to the Cat Country Morning Show with Joe and Jahna, weekdays from 5:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Cat Country 107.3, on the Cat Country 107.3 app and catcountry1073.com.

WATCH: TV locations in every state

WATCH: Stunning vintage photos capture the beauty of America’s national parks

Today, these parks are spread across the country in 25 states and the US Virgin Islands. The land around them was bought or donated, although much of it was inhabited by native people for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world and as spaces for exploration.

Continue to scroll through 50 vintage photos that showcase the beauty of America’s national parks.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-jersey-apparently-needs-to-improve-its-roller-coaster-game/feed/ 0
7 vintage Alabama homes and the fascinating history behind them https://chattahoocheetrace.com/7-vintage-alabama-homes-and-the-fascinating-history-behind-them/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/7-vintage-alabama-homes-and-the-fascinating-history-behind-them/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 12:00:54 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/7-vintage-alabama-homes-and-the-fascinating-history-behind-them/ In the past two years, Zachary Aaron has driven thousands of miles in his car, traveling back and forth across the state, taking photos of period homes in Alabama and sharing their stories on his Instagram account – Alabama Homes. “I’ve always been in the history and architecture of the South,” says the Florence-based mortgage […]]]>


In the past two years, Zachary Aaron has driven thousands of miles in his car, traveling back and forth across the state, taking photos of period homes in Alabama and sharing their stories on his Instagram account – Alabama Homes.

“I’ve always been in the history and architecture of the South,” says the Florence-based mortgage underwriter. “I like to explore off the beaten track. “

His day job at a credit union helps Aaron research the history of homes, as do community Facebook pages in cities where he finds aging homes.

“People are interested in it, in a simple way,” he says. “I was surprised at the level of interest people have in him.”

A fan of Southern Gothic literature, Aaron says his interest in houses evolved beyond the outward beauty of houses to tell how they came into being and how many fell into disrepair.

“I went above and beyond to have a relationship with Pretty White Houses,” Aaron said. “Every small town has an interesting history, but the majority of places don’t have a clear history.”

He would love to write a coffee table style book and tell the stories of the neglected communities behind the houses, such as the enslaved black workers who built pre-war mansions.

“I don’t like the whitewashed version of the story,” he said. “In a family Bible, there may be records to tell these stories, but I don’t have the resources to find them. I want to be inclusive as much as possible.

We asked him to share pictures and stories behind some of the most interesting houses he has found:

1. John Henry Young Webb House • ca. 1855 • Greensboro, AL

This house was built by Colonel Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus DeYampert (QC) for his daughter Julia and her husband, John Henry Webb.

John Henry Young Webb House • approx. 1855 • Greensboro, AL This house was built by Colonel Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus DeYampert (QC) for his daughter Julia and her husband, John Henry Webb. DeYampert was one of the founding trustees of the University of the South at Greensboro, which was established as a Methodist University. In 1918, the university merged with Birmingham College to become Birmingham-Southern College.

DeYampert was one of the founding trustees of the University of the South at Greensboro, which was established as a Methodist University. In 1918, the university merged with Birmingham College to become Birmingham-Southern College.

2. Wallace-Beasley House, Paul Rudolph House | California. 1964 | Athens, AL

Paul Rudolph, a graduate of Auburn University, was an American architect and chairman of the Department of Architecture at Yale University for six years.

He is known for his use of concrete and very complex floor plans. His most famous work is the Yale Art and Architecture Building, a spatially complex brutalist concrete structure.

.

Wallace-Beasley House, Paul Rudolph House | California. 1964 | Athens, AL Paul Rudolph, a graduate of Auburn University, was an American architect and chairman of the Department of Architecture at Yale University for six years. He is known for his use of concrete and very complex floor plans. His most famous work is the Yale Art and Architecture Building, a spatially complex brutalist concrete structure.

This particular house features 32 brick columns as a nod to the southern Greek Revival style, which is prominent in northern Alabama. And every surface has been painted a brilliant white to reflect the sunlight.

The house was featured in the February 26 issue of Life Magazine in 1965.

3. Tacon-Gordon-Tissington-Vitalo House | California. 1901 | Mobile, AL

Henry Tacon, secretary and treasurer of the Mobile and Ohio and Bay Shore railroads, began construction of this house in 1899.

.

Tacon-Gordon-Tissington-Vitalo House | California. 1901 | Mobile, AL Henry Tacon, Secretary and Treasurer of the Mobile and Ohio and Bay Shore Railways, began construction on this house in 1899. The house was built with three court rooms, one for each of Tacon’s daughters. One of these living rooms features a remarkable French linen wallpaper with gold embossing.

The house was built with three court rooms, one for each of Tacon’s daughters.

One of these living rooms features a remarkable French linen wallpaper with gold embossing.

4. Bride’s Hill, Sunnybrook | California. 1830 | Wheeler, AL

A member of the Dandridge family, cousin of Martha Washington, is said to have built Bride’s Hill.

.

Bride’s Hill, Sunnybrook | California. 1830 | Wheeler, AL A member of the Dandridge family, cousin of Martha Washington, is said to have built Bride’s Hill. Once absorbed into Joseph Wheeler’s expansive estate in 1907, the house and surrounding farm became known as Sunnybrook. Located in rural Lawrence County, the house has been unoccupied since the 1980s and is currently in a state of disrepair.

Once absorbed into the sprawling Joseph Wheeler Estate in 1907, the house and surrounding farm became known as Sunnybrook.

Located in rural Lawrence County, the house has been vacant since the 1980s and is currently in poor condition.

5. Pitts Folly | California. 1852 | Uniontown, AL

Phillip Henry Pitts, builder, was married to Margaret Davidson, a descendant of William Lee Davidson who founded Davidson College in North Carolina.

.

Pitts Folly | California. 1852 | Uniontown, AL Phillip Henry Pitts, builder, was married to Margaret Davidson, a descendant of William Lee Davidson who founded Davidson College in North Carolina. According to legend, the name was given by the people of Uniontown because they considered the house to be insane due to its immense size.

According to legend, the name was given by the people of Uniontown because they considered the house to be insane due to its immense size.

6. Wilfred van Valkenburgh House, Gothic Steamboat House ca. 1885 Huntsville, Alabama

The land where this house originally stood was purchased by a bank in 1973, and plans were put in place to demolish the structure.

Fortunately, the Federated Women’s Clubs of Huntsville have obtained permission to move the house to its current location.

.

Wilfred van Valkenburgh House, Steamboat Gothic House ca. 1885 Huntsville, AL The land on which this house originally stood was purchased by a bank in 1973, and plans were put in place to demolish the structure. Fortunately, the Federated Women’s Clubs of Huntsville have obtained permission to move the house to its current location. Once the house was on wheels to be moved, it was determined that it was too tall and would require cutting down mature trees along the street to avoid damaging them. Fortunately, after sitting in the middle of the street for several days, the mover was able to plan a different route, preserving the structure and trees.

Once the house was on wheels to be moved, it was determined that it was too tall and mature trees would need to be pruned along the street to avoid damage.

Fortunately, after sitting in the middle of the street for several days, the mover was able to plan a different route, preserving the structure and trees.

The porch was modified in the early 1900s, but was restored to its original condition in a 1990s remodel.

7. Kendall Manor, James Turner Kendall House | California. 1860 | Eufaula, AL.

James Turner Kendall began construction of this house designed by George W. Whipple in 1860.

The Civil War interrupted the final completion until 1867; unlike many others, Kendall’s finances were not negatively affected by the war.

.

Kendall Manor, James Turner Kendall House | California. 1860 | Eufaula, AL. James Turner Kendall began construction of this house designed by George W. Whipple in 1860. Civil War interrupted final completion until 1867; unlike many, Kendall’s finances were not negatively affected by the war. Family tradition suggests that generation after generation wrote their names on the walls of the “white tower” in remembrance, and the key to the tower is kept as tightly as family money. Additional photos are from the book “The Storied Kendalls” by Anne Kendrick Walker.

Family tradition suggests that generation after generation wrote their names on the walls of the “white tower” in remembrance, and the key to the tower is kept as tightly as family money.

Additional photos are from the book “The Storied Kendalls” by Anne Kendrick Walker.

Here are more vintage images and stories from Alabama’s past..





Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/7-vintage-alabama-homes-and-the-fascinating-history-behind-them/feed/ 0
Shelburne Museum reopens: Currier and Ives and Mrs. Scollay join Mr. Scollay | Vermont Arts https://chattahoocheetrace.com/shelburne-museum-reopens-currier-and-ives-and-mrs-scollay-join-mr-scollay-vermont-arts/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/shelburne-museum-reopens-currier-and-ives-and-mrs-scollay-join-mr-scollay-vermont-arts/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/shelburne-museum-reopens-currier-and-ives-and-mrs-scollay-join-mr-scollay-vermont-arts/ Black smoke billows from the stack of the locomotive blowing along the tracks with its red cowcatcher in front and tiny passenger cars in tow. In the background, a white paddle wheel steamboat sails along a wide river. Picturesque and luminous, Frances Flora (Fanny) Palmer’s lithographic print, “American Express Train” (1864), celebrates technological progress. The […]]]>


Black smoke billows from the stack of the locomotive blowing along the tracks with its red cowcatcher in front and tiny passenger cars in tow. In the background, a white paddle wheel steamboat sails along a wide river.

Picturesque and luminous, Frances Flora (Fanny) Palmer’s lithographic print, “American Express Train” (1864), celebrates technological progress. The civil war was not over, but the picture looks to the future with optimism.

“American Express Train” is one of 60 prints in the exhibit “Revisiting America: The Prints of Currier and Ives,” which opens next week at the Shelburne Museum.

The Shelburne Museum reopens its entire 45-acre campus and nearly all of its 39 exhibit buildings on Wednesday. The park of the museum is in all its spring splendor. Museum buildings are ready to welcome visitors again, with security protocols in place – limited occupancy of buildings and masks inside at this time. The 1903 carousel turns. Even the cafe is open.

“We’re almost fully open and it looks awesome. We look forward to welcoming people here, ”explained Tom Denenberg, Director of the Shelburne Museum.

New exhibitions are up and coming. Outdoor sculptures of “Peter Kirkiles: At Scale” are installed around the campus, including a wooden camera and a steel clock. In the galleries of the Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, “Revisiting America” will be joined by “New England Now: People”, opening June 26th. Organized by Carolyn Bauer, “New England Now: People” features contemporary artists who consider the people and communities of our region today.

Two separate long portraits are brought together in the Webb Memorial Gallery. John Singleton Copley, a prominent 18th century portrait painter, painted portraits of prominent Bostonian John Scollay and his wife in the 1760s. Over time, the paintings ended up in separate collections. John Scollay’s, purchased by museum founder Electra Havemeyer Webb in 1959, then came to Shelburne. “Mrs. John Scollay (Mercy Greenleaf),” originally intended to be exhibited with her husband, had previously been separated from him and was held in a different collection. Several months ago, Mrs. Scollay’s painting was listed for sale through Sotheby’s Acquired by the Shelburne Museum, she is again alongside her husband A webinar by Denenberg on the paintings and the recent acquisition is on the museum’s website.

“Revisiting America: The Prints of Currier and Ives” comes to Shelburne from the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska, continuing a collaboration between the two institutions. In 2016, food company Conagra Brands donated nearly 600 Currier and Ives prints to Joslyn.

“Currier and Ives were truly the 19th century publishing powerhouse when it came to delivering images that the average consumer could afford to decorate their home. These were meant to be visually compelling images and they were to attract a wide range of buyers, ”said Katie Wood Kirchhoff, associate curator at the Shelburne Museum.

Founded by lithographer Nathaniel Currier in 1835, the company that became Currier and Ives in 1857 continued until 1907. A crucial impression in starting the business was Currier’s vivid image of the ruins of the Merchant’s Exchange in New York City. after being devastated by fire in 1835. Published in the New York Sun, this was one of the first illustrated articles. His prints of the dramatic picture sold out quickly, showing the public’s appetite for affordable pictures, even, or perhaps most importantly, of disasters, for their homes.

Currier and Ives’ subjects were motivated by the interests of their clients. They document aspects of their time and reflect the values ​​and interests of their audiences – nostalgia for simpler times, Victorian ideals, increased leisure time and engagement in sport, humor, excitement of technological progress, western expansion of America, etc.

Currier and Ives worked with many well-known artists of the time, reproducing their paintings as prints. They also had a team of artist-lithographers producing images. Their lithographs, images engraved on stone and printed in black on white, have been hand painted in watercolors throughout much of the company’s history, with color printing arriving in the late 1800s. They have released more than 7,500 different prints, with artists producing two to three new images per week.

Prints by several of the firm’s greatest artists are included in the exhibition – sports scenes by Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait, the clippers by James Butterworth, “Central Park, Winter: The Skating Pond” by Charles Parsons, a scene from winter of George H. Durrie.

Frances Flora Palmer was the rare artistic woman at Currier and Ives. Born and educated in England, Palmer worked there from 1849 to 1868, producing over 200 images. His images have compelling qualities of depth and composition.

“Most of Fannie’s images were designed to be lithographs. She thought about the color and the composition. Once you tune in, you can almost choose hers, ”Kirchhoff said.

“Revisiting America” addresses several themes. “Sporting Life” features hunting and fishing, a high-speed horse-drawn sleigh race and a beautiful image of an 1866 baseball game. “America at War and at Peace” includes battle scenes , historic moments, revered presidents. Romantic images of the American West, mostly by artists who have never traveled there, are featured in “The Frontier”.

Considerable thought has been given to including a more difficult aspect of engravers – their images of the southern United States. Less than a decade after the Civil War, their scenes included sentimental views of the pre-war South – images of the gracious lives of white plantation owners and a view of enslaved blacks as content with their servitude and their status. Examples of these are in the show. The museum’s text notes that Currier and Ives also posted mocking and degrading images and fanatic cartoons of black Americans, though none of these are on display.

“It’s the museum’s job to tell stories in a balanced way, and it seemed like such an omission to leave those images out. By putting these objects together, we get informed conversations about why they look like them and how these stories work, ”Kirchhoff said.

“Revisiting America” has a nice connection to the Shelburne Museum collections. Among the museum’s collections there are large and small artifacts and buildings with a strong resemblance to the subjects of the prints – the Ticonderoga side-wheeled steamboat, the 220 locomotive, the sleds and cars in the Horseshoe Barn, Victorian vases and tableware in decorative arts collections, and much more. . The printing press also shed light on the processes that created these popular works.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/shelburne-museum-reopens-currier-and-ives-and-mrs-scollay-join-mr-scollay-vermont-arts/feed/ 0
New Movies and Shows to Watch on Amazon Prime Video This Weekend https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-movies-and-shows-to-watch-on-amazon-prime-video-this-weekend/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-movies-and-shows-to-watch-on-amazon-prime-video-this-weekend/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 17:15:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-movies-and-shows-to-watch-on-amazon-prime-video-this-weekend/ We’ve arrived at the weekend and the last two days of the month, and Amazon Prime Video features a selection of new shows and older movies to keep you busy for the next few days. Amazon Prime releases the first season of Panic, a series that follows high school kids who risk their lives, a […]]]>


We’ve arrived at the weekend and the last two days of the month, and Amazon Prime Video features a selection of new shows and older movies to keep you busy for the next few days.

Amazon Prime releases the first season of Panic, a series that follows high school kids who risk their lives, a classic romantic comedy, a stand-up comedy, and early May titles.

Take a break from the outside world and escape. You deserved it.

Panic – Season 1 (Amazon Original)

No one knows who invented Panic or when it started. But in the forgotten rural town of Carp, Texas, gambling is the only way out. Each summer, senior graduates risk their lives as they participate in a series of challenges that force them to face their deepest fears about the chance to earn life-changing money. Anyone can play. Only one will win. Let the games begin.

The wedding of my best friend

How about a classic late ’90s romantic comedy?

Vakeel Saheb

A criminal lawyer helps three young women fight an assault case against a wealthy child.

LOL, Who’s Laughing, Get out! S1 (Amazon Original)

Philippe Lacheau invited 10 actors and comedians to live a unique experience in a grandiose setting. There is only one rule to follow for the next six hours: if you laugh, you are eliminated. The 10 actors will have to keep their cool despite trying to make themselves laugh. The winner will receive 50,000 euros for the charity he represents.

Here are a few headlines that fell on the streaming service earlier in May, in case you missed:

Solos – Season 1 (Amazon Original)

Solos is a seven-part anthology series that explores the weird, beautiful, heartbreaking, hilarious and wonderful truths of what it means to be human. Performed by eight of the best actors of our time, this series spans our present and future and grapples with time travel, AI robots, solo travel to the far reaches of the universe, intriguing smart homes, a mysterious waiting room, fertility in the near future. illegal memory treatments and transplants, all to illuminate the deeper meaning of human connection.

P! NK: Everything I know so far (Amazon Original)

Join award-winning musician P! NK as she embarks on her record-breaking 2019 “Beautiful Trauma” world tour and invites audiences to join the family of their choice while trying to balance being a mother, wife, patron and artist. Blending roadside footage, behind-the-scenes interviews and personal material, director Michael Gracey (The greatest showman) gives the audience a glimpse behind the curtain of the circus she calls life.

5x Comedia S1 (Amazon Original)

Everyone has a story to tell about 2020. Whether it’s relationships, work, friendship or family, isolation has affected them all. Join Rafael Portugal, Samantha Schmütz, Yuri Marçal, Gregório Duvivier, Thati Lopes, Victor Lamoglia and Martha Nowill as they laugh at their worst moments of 2020.

Horizon Line (Amazon Original)

Skyline is an exciting survival story about a estranged couple, Sara (Allison Williams) and Jackson (Alexander Dreymon), who discover new altitudes of fear aboard a single-engine aircraft.

LOL: Si te ríes, pierdes Season 1 (Amazon Original)

Santiago Segura welcomes Spain’s best comedians (Edu Soto, Sílvia Abril, Rossy De Palma, Mario Vaquerizo and many more) in a competition to make others laugh while avoiding themselves laughing at the events of their opponents. Whoever can last the longest with a serious face wins 100,000 euros to donate to an NGO of his choice.

The Underground Railroad (Amazon Original)

By Oscar winner Barry Jenkins based on the Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Colson Whitehead, The underground railroad recounts Cora Randall (Thuso Mbedu) ‘s desperate attempt for freedom in the pre-war South. After escaping a plantation in Georgia for the Underground Railroad, Cora discovers not just a metaphor, but a veritable railroad filled with engineers and conductors, and a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the floor of the South.

The Last Hour – Season 1 (Amazon Original)

The last hour marks the Indian debut of acclaimed Oscar-winning director Asif Kapadia as the producer of this supernatural thriller set in a Himalayan hill station. The cast includes Sanjay Kapoor, Karma Takapa, Shaylee Krishen and Shahana Goswami.

The boy from Medellín (Amazon Original)

Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Matthew Heineman gives us a surprisingly intimate portrait of one of the greatest international music superstars of our time. The boy from Medellín follows J Balvin as he prepares for the most important concert of his career – a sold-out show in his hometown of Medellín, Colombia.

Wild mountain thyme

Two star-studded lovers in Ireland find themselves caught up in their family’s land dispute.

Without remorse (Amazon Original)

The film follows an elite Navy SEAL who uncovers an international conspiracy while seeking justice for the murder of his pregnant wife from Tom Clancy’s Without remorse, the explosive origin story of action hero John Clark – one of the most popular characters in author Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan universe. The track stars Michael B. Jordan, Jodie Turner-Smith and Jamie Bell.

Stowaway (exclusive content)

An accidental stowaway accidentally causes severe damage to the spacecraft’s life support systems during a mission to Mars. Faced with dwindling resources and a potentially fatal outcome, the crew is forced to make an impossible decision.

Saina

Saina follows the story of Saina Nehwal, a professional badminton player who ranked number 1 in the sport.

Nos4a2 – Season 2

Charlie Manx, an attractive immortal who feeds on the souls of children, sees his entire world threatened when a young New England woman discovers she has a dangerous gift.

Frank of Ireland – Season 1 (Amazon Original)

Located in an idyllic suburb of Dublin, Brian Gleeson (Peaky Blinders, Bisexual), plays the role of Frank Marron, a 32-year-old disaster; a misanthropic fantasy with arrested development, convinced that the world owes it.

Wander

Aaron Eckhart, Tommy Lee Jones and Heather Graham star in The Edge of Your Seat thriller following Arthur Bretnik, a paranoid private investigator with a troubled past. After Bretnik (Eckhart) is hired to investigate a suspicious death in the town of Wander, he becomes convinced that the case relates to the same “plot cover-up” that caused his daughter’s death.

Mr. Mercedes – Season 1 – Season 3

A retired detective embarks on a dangerous and potentially criminal crusade when a serial killer begins to torment him through a series of letters and emails.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/new-movies-and-shows-to-watch-on-amazon-prime-video-this-weekend/feed/ 0
Disney World’s best rival just rocked the theme park industry https://chattahoocheetrace.com/disney-worlds-best-rival-just-rocked-the-theme-park-industry/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/disney-worlds-best-rival-just-rocked-the-theme-park-industry/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 15:05:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/disney-worlds-best-rival-just-rocked-the-theme-park-industry/ IIt was the pay hike heard in the Disney world. Comcastof (NASDAQ: CMCSA) Universal Orlando announced Thursday that it will pay all employees a minimum of $ 15 an hour starting June 27. Central Florida. Rival Disney (NYSE: DIS) get there. Three summers ago, Disney World struck a deal with half a dozen unions representing […]]]>


IIt was the pay hike heard in the Disney world. Comcastof (NASDAQ: CMCSA) Universal Orlando announced Thursday that it will pay all employees a minimum of $ 15 an hour starting June 27. Central Florida.

Rival Disney (NYSE: DIS) get there. Three summers ago, Disney World struck a deal with half a dozen unions representing the lion’s share of the resort’s employees. Disney was starting new employees at just $ 10 an hour at the time, but the deal calls for an increase in the size of House of Mouse until the new minimum hourly rate for “cast members.” no tip goes from $ 14 to $ 15 in October. With staffing becoming an issue in many consumer-facing businesses, victory in the “fight for $ 15” was inevitable.

It was supposed to be the summer that national theme parks and regional amusement parks have been waiting for two years. Can Theme Park Operators Thrive In The New Normal? Should investors start dividing winners from losers as wage inflation crushes the turnstiles? Let’s take a closer look at Comcast’s significant move.

Image source: Universal Orlando.

Take a ride

What if the country had a post-pandemic wake-up party and too many people were called sick? Many industries are currently suffering from a staffing crisis. This is evident in the restaurant industry. Even the major ridesharing companies are struggling, as the demand for transport and take-out deliveries is ahead of the supply of pilots.

We are already seeing ripples in the theme park industry, and that is before the peak summer travel season begins. Cedar Fairof (NYSE: FUN) The iconic Cedar Point recently turned heads to update its June availability. The park will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday for the next four weeks, due to the lack of employees to operate every day. Last week, he made the dramatic decision to double his pay to $ 20 an hour and offer a $ 500 signing bonus for new hires or hires. Raising labor costs will take a toll on the bottom line, but it’s better than not being open at all.

Universal Orlando and ultimately Disney paying $ 15 an hour will be easier to digest at closed attractions where day tickets run into triple digits, but you have to wonder about the competition. Third-largest theme park operator in Central Florida in terms of attendance SeaWorld Entertainment (NYSE: MER) – raised its hourly rate to $ 11 an hour at the end of 2018. It will not be able to stay there when its two biggest rivals pay 36% more. SeaWorld Orlando employees may be passionate about the cause of marine life, but will it still hold up if we literally cut them down?

Paying more is easier said than done, especially now when a theme park’s profit potential is capped by seating capacity limits and travel restrictions are eating away at the center’s more lucrative customers. Florida. SeaWorld stock can be reach new heights, but keep an eye out for its operating schedule and continued delays in new rides due to debut in 2020. Investors are bidding leisure stocks ahead of what’s supposed to be a blazing summer season, but don’t forget to stress the point of work.

10 stocks we love better than Walt Disney
When investment geniuses David and Tom Gardner have stock advice, he can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they’ve been distributing for over a decade, Motley Fool Fellowship Advisor, has tripled the market. *

David and Tom have just revealed what they believe to be the ten best stocks for investors to buy now … and Walt Disney was not one of them! That’s right – they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

See the 10 actions

* Stock Advisor returns as of May 11, 2021

Rick munarriz owns shares of Walt Disney. The Motley Fool owns stocks and recommends Walt Disney. The Motley Fool recommends Cedar Fair and Comcast. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/disney-worlds-best-rival-just-rocked-the-theme-park-industry/feed/ 0
Civil War Attraction: Vicksburg National Military Park https://chattahoocheetrace.com/civil-war-attraction-vicksburg-national-military-park/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/civil-war-attraction-vicksburg-national-military-park/#respond Mon, 24 May 2021 19:15:27 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/civil-war-attraction-vicksburg-national-military-park/ Visit the massive Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi – it covers over 1,700 acres just two miles from Vicksburg – to relive a pivotal Civil War battle. There’s a lot to see: 1,325 historical monuments and markers, 20 miles of reconstructed trenches, two pre-war houses, 144 cannons, a national cemetery and a restored heavy-duty […]]]>



Visit the massive Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi – it covers over 1,700 acres just two miles from Vicksburg – to relive a pivotal Civil War battle. There’s a lot to see: 1,325 historical monuments and markers, 20 miles of reconstructed trenches, two pre-war houses, 144 cannons, a national cemetery and a restored heavy-duty gunboat. In addition, it is magnificent. “Visitors are usually overwhelmed by the park’s unique topography, made up of rolling hills and ravines, and many notice how beautiful each monument is,” says Brendan Wilson, Chief Interpretation, Education and Partnerships by VNMP.

Veterans of the Confederate Campaign and the Union wanted to pay tribute to the more than 37,000 people who died here in 1863 during the three-month battle for control of the Mississippi River. The military park was established in 1899, before the federal government created the national park system in 1916. The states, North and South, have built monuments to fallen troops, and you will see tombstones, obelisks and sculptures designed by some of the prominent artists of the early 20th century.

“The battlefield offers a sense of belonging. With a landscape still marked by trenches and earthworks, it is a silent testament to the courage, strength and sacrifice of soldiers and civilians, ”Wilson says. “

Considering the size of VNMP, the amount of information to absorb about the siege of Vicksburg and the war, and the charms of the city of Vicksburg, it is wise – if you have the time – to spend several days in explore the park and the region. With this three-day plan, you can fully immerse yourself in the Vicksburg experience. (You’ll also find a shortened route below.)

Day 1

At the VNMP reception center, a 20-minute orientation film provides the context of the siege and features stories from some of the families who fought here. You’ll also find maps and a small museum with replicas of hospital trenches and tents, as well as artifacts such as the stone monument that marked the spot where Union General Ulysses S. Grant and General Confederate John Pemberton discussed the terms of Vicksburg’s surrender.

Armed with this background, embark on the park’s 16-mile driving circuit, which consists of two connected loops – the north and south loops – and will last two hours or more. The tour reaches major stops, but for in-depth seat information, consider hiring a licensed guide, who will also do the driving (outside of Covid). Reserve one (from $ 50 per car) through Visit Vicksburg (601-636-3827).

The 13-mile north loop winds through hills and valleys and passes monuments and other sites, including the Third Louisiana Redan, a fort with replica guns that soldiers used to repel advancing forces. Another must-see is the USS Cairo, a gunboat used in the shallow waters of the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers that sank in an 1862 battle. You can walk through the reassembled battleship even when its museum is closed, and see its wide interior beams and gigantic size put into perspective the scale of the tools used by soldiers in combat.

Near the end of the loop, stop by the Second Texas Lunette, a fortification built by the Confederates in 1862, to view the trenches and other defenses used during the siege.

Some visitors develop battlefield fatigue by the time they arrive at the 3 Mile South Loop, but if they continue to persevere they will be rewarded with beautiful views, powerful stories, and the State Monument of the Iowa, where six bronze panels by HH Kitson tell the story of the Vicksburg countryside.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/civil-war-attraction-vicksburg-national-military-park/feed/ 0
Portrait of the United States as a Developing Country https://chattahoocheetrace.com/portrait-of-the-united-states-as-a-developing-country/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/portrait-of-the-united-states-as-a-developing-country/#respond Thu, 20 May 2021 06:38:46 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/?p=573 Seymour Fogel’s “The Wealth of the Nation” (1938), a mural at the Wilbur J. Cohen Federal Building—originally meant to house the newly formed Social Security Administration—in Washington, D.C. Fogel painted the mural on commission from the New Deal’s Public Works for Arts Project. Image: Wikimedia Dispelling myths of entrepreneurial exceptionalism, a sweeping new history of […]]]>


Seymour Fogel’s “The Wealth of the Nation” (1938), a mural at the Wilbur J. Cohen Federal Building—originally meant to house the newly formed Social Security Administration—in Washington, D.C. Fogel painted the mural on commission from the New Deal’s Public Works for Arts Project. Image: Wikimedia

Dispelling myths of entrepreneurial exceptionalism, a sweeping new history of U.S. capitalism finds that economic gains have always been driven by the state.

Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States
Jonathan Levy
Random House, $40 (cloth)

The start of Joe Biden’s presidency has prompted an unlikely reassessment of the direction of American capitalism. Announcing a “paradigm shift” away from a policy regime that for decades has ruthlessly favored the very wealthy, Biden has invoked the New Deal to capture his vision for activist government. Alongside the expansion of the welfare state, he has promised an ambitious developmental agenda that links together infrastructure, industrial policy, and an energy transition to fight climate change. Though Biden’s resolve to execute his vision remains untested, the prospects for aggressive state intervention now seem far greater than during the Great Recession, when austerity quickly became a transatlantic phenomenon.

A central question for Biden’s new economic agenda is how exactly government can induce capital to work on behalf of public welfare.

The most salient difference between then and now is that Biden has identified long-term investment as critical to the very preservation of democracy. Breaking from the neoliberal economists who held sway over Democratic policymaking for a generation, Biden’s vision is also a quiet disavowal of Hillary Clinton’s boast three years ago that, despite losing the 2016 presidential election to Donald Trump, she “won the places that represent two-thirds of America’s gross domestic product”—the parts of the country “that are optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward.” The pandemic has only further illustrated how even the country’s most prosperous cities, once the drivers of growth in the age of globalization, are in acute need of state-led projects and egalitarian distribution.

A central question for this new era of U.S. political economy is how exactly government can induce capital to work on behalf of public welfare. If capital is predisposed to liquidity, how do political agents steer it toward investment? In his prodigious new book Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States, economic historian Jonathan Levy illustrates the historical conditions under which just such direction has been possible, arguing that the long arcs of transformative development in U.S. history have never spontaneously arisen from the market. “What separates the ages of American capitalism . . . are not strictly economic variables but rather political initiatives,” Levy writes. He shows how statesmen have always steered the course of U.S. capitalism, with stark implications for inequality, social mobility, ideas of citizenship, and popular views of the responsibilities of government and business.

The book is divided into four sections: “The Age of Commerce (1660–1860),” “The Age of Capital (1860–1932),” “The Age of Control (1932–1980),” and “The Age of Chaos (1980–).” Across each Levy pursues three theses. First is that capital is not so much a thing, a “physical factor of production,” as a “process”—investment based on expectations of future profit. Second is that the “profit motive” itself “has never been enough to drive economic history, not even the history of capitalism.” And third is that “the history of capitalism is a never-ending conflict between the short-term propensity to hoard and the long-term ability and inducement to invest.” Levy covers a wide range of technical ground—from the tensions between monetary and fiscal policies and the consequences of deflation and inflation, to the growing complexities of globalized finance and the contemporary primacy of the Federal Reserve—but the book also doubles as a vivid social and geopolitical history. Indeed, as he writes in the introduction, “today mainstream economics follows a path of great mathematical rigor that . . . does not make much room for other accounts of economic life.” Instead, Levy argues for “the rightful place of historical analysis in economics, and for a broader vision of what the economy is.”

In his survey of the evolving topographies of economic development and the political coalitions that drove them, Levy foregrounds the country’s two great, yet deeply flawed, developmental coalitions: the industrializing Republican coalition of the nineteenth century and the New Deal coalition in the twentieth. It is through these coalitions that U.S. capital most prioritized illiquid investments, spurring advances in infrastructure and technology that eventually integrated a national, consumerist economy. Though the book is about much more than these coalitions, their example strongly underpins its central argument about the role of political agency in shaping economic affairs.

Levy argues that the long arcs of transformative development in U.S. history have never spontaneously arisen from the market.

Perhaps above all, these coalitions help us think clearly about the historical trajectory of the United States as a developing country, demonstrating that economic progress—sometimes with more democracy, sometimes with much less—has depended on the compromises and cross-class alignments that political actors have brokered in the pursuit of statecraft and national power. Economists and economic historians will have their say about the book’s interventions in technical debates. But given Biden’s efforts to signal a decisive shift away from neoliberalism, it is also instructive to examine the triumphs—and the failures—of these coalitions at the heart of Levy’s history.

• • •

Colonial Trade and the Institution of Slavery

Many of the features that would shape these two great periods of U.S. economic expansion—including stark regional divisions and competing interpretations of economic freedom—emerged in the colonial period of preindustrial development, Levy shows. The book begins with the origins of English mercantilism in the late seventeenth century, which for Levy exemplifies “the paradox that state authority should encourage the wealth-generating capacities of private commerce yet still restrain commercial self-interest—a dangerous impulse that threatened moral and political order.” The contest between freedom and social obligation that shapes the long course of U.S. political thought ultimately derives, Levy argues, from this central paradox.

Initially the English state intended the colonies to serve as “vents” for England’s surplus manufacture and population—creating, in effect, foreign demand while curbing domestic unemployment—and to supply some raw materials to the metropole. But New England colonists defied restrictions on local manufacture, accelerating the growth of an English bureaucracy that tried to keep pace with colonies intent on asserting political control over their own economic development. For a time the metropole assumed a more pragmatic approach, and with the Bank of England propelling commercial investment, the basis for intra-empire free trade was laid. Thus, Levy argues, the intellectual and practical foundations for “exponential capitalist economic growth” were established. At the same time, Levy emphasizes that “in large measure, the Age of Commerce in North America began with the English imperial commitment to black slavery.”

That commitment was not “fated,” Levy writes. Slavery’s dramatic expansion began with a “choice made by England’s rulers” to deter emigration once England’s population began to decline. In place of migration, the work of colonization would now be achieved through slavery. “By the middle of the eighteenth century,” Levy notes, “commodities produced by black slaves accounted for 80 percent of all colonial American commodities exported back to the home country.” After 1689 the slave trade had been opened up to all Englishmen, foreshadowing the Herrenvolk democracy of the early U.S. republic. Yet slavery’s higher concentration in the South also set the stage for divergent paths of regional development that would exacerbate sectionalism in the late antebellum era.

One of the book’s most significant achievements is to illustrate the value of viewing the history of the United States as that of a developing country.

While the plantation South comprised the wealthiest colonies outside the West Indies, the North diversified its commercial and nascent manufacturing capacities. The presence of fewer enslaved people in the Northern colonies meant more people participating in trade, although Northern elites would remain active in the slave trade until the rise of abolitionism. Describing the fledgling culture of the Northern colonial bourgeoisie, Levy shows how Atlantic trade fueled a “Smithian commercial multiplier” through the eighteenth century, fueling colonial wealth and the spread of markets to such a degree that living standards probably exceeded that of the average person anywhere else in the world. At the same time, the explosion of commerce and slavery reified doctrines of private property in the colonies.

The U.S. war of independence would elevate a fundamental division over the direction of the struggling republic’s political economy. “In this era,” Levy writes, “politicians—not men of business enterprise—were most responsible for charting the republic’s long-term economic future.” Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton personified the clash of competing republicanisms: Jefferson envisioned a self-sufficient agrarian republic predicated on westward expansion, while Hamilton sought to build upon the model of transatlantic finance that had stimulated Northern commerce and manufacturing. The essence of Hamilton’s outlook, Levy writes, was that “in a republic, only state power could harmonize the tension between private self-interest and the public good.” Jefferson virulently opposed this developmental project, fearing that it would marginalize small property owners, fuel oligarchy, and invite a transnational elite to drain the young republic of its economic sovereignty. As it happened, the statecraft of each rival would inform the other. The state’s Hamiltonian financial architecture, including the Bank of the United States, would fund Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase, while Jefferson’s embargo on exports during his administration fostered development of the internal market—advancing the incipient industrialization Hamilton had championed in his 1791 Report on the Subject of Manufactures.

Despite the occasional synthesis of these two developmental visions, it was Jefferson’s that triumphed politically until the Civil War, Levy shows. Andrew Jackson would denounce the “American System” of long-term national planning proposed by Kentucky Whig Henry Clay in the wake of the War of 1812. Appealing to anti-monopoly sentiments, Jackson assembled a political coalition around small manufacturers who feared becoming wage dependent; they called themselves “the Democracy.” Development during Jackson’s presidency (1829–1837) was frenzied and haphazard. Even as the populism of the day attempted to cordon off—or “sphere,” as Levy puts it—the public realm from private commercial interest, statecraft impelled investment and vice versa. Above all, Jackson’s genocidal policy of Native American removal channeled speculative investment into the country’s expanding periphery, which facilitated a surge in internal improvements. But the growth of infrastructure was tethered to loans sourced from distant creditors; state-chartered banking corporations, for instance, were often capitalized via state debt sales. When the Bank of England raised the bank rate to restore gold reserves, there was no contingent policy to manage the late 1830s financial panic and economic downturn. This development, Levy points out, was a classic case of a global credit cycle ending. Jackson had built a political career attacking elites, but the developmental processes he accelerated were inexorably tied to the caprices of northeastern and British investors.

In addition to Jackson’s white settler frontier, an essential driver of interregional economic development was the expansion of the brutal domestic slave market. Closure of the Atlantic slave trade in 1808 led to a “Second Middle Passage” that was fueled instead through the biological reproduction of enslaved people, and the booming plantation economy spurred internal trade along waterways connecting the old northwest and southern states. Synthesizing Karl Marx’s explication of slavery as an economic institution and the planter elite’s own understanding of it, Levy shows how enslaved people were construed as portable capital assets with a “prospective pecuniary yield” whose value was primarily regulated by the price of cotton. The system extracted a truly staggering degree of aggregate national wealth, dramatically eclipsing other sources of growth in the 1850s. The “value” of the four million enslaved people in the United States came to three billion dollars, Levy finds—“triple the value of the entire U.S. industrial capital stock in 1860.” By then the largest cotton plantations were effectively organized along proto-Fordist lines, functioning like plants with a strict division of labor across different tasks to maximize efficiency. At the same time, the planter class reinforced this brutal economic regime by mounting a perversely paternalistic defense of slavery, casting the enslaved as cared-for extensions of planter families.

The developmental lens emphasizes how ideological beliefs and political actors structured the course of industrialization.

Such paternalism accentuated the divergence in regional political economy between the 1840s and Lincoln’s election, Levy argues. “A state-government-led ‘transportation revolution’ in market infrastructure” that was far more concentrated in the North had already initiated the region’s great leap in industrialization. Canals and turnpike corporations bolstered market density and access, which led to burgeoning metropolitan networks of financiers, manufacturers, merchants, and tradespeople. What Levy calls an “industrial investment multiplier” was taking shape, and consequently a new stage in American capitalism. An emerging class of industrialists was on the cusp of investing in an unprecedented level of long-term fixed capital that would not only remake the physical structure of cities and towns but hasten the economic integration, through the rail system, of a manufacturing belt spanning the Northeast to the Midwest. These changes would transform the U.S. economy, but a political catalyst was required, and it came in the form of the Republican Party.

• • •

The Rise of Republican Industrialization

The next section of the book, “The Age of Capital,” begins on the eve of the Civil War, showing how the pace of industrialization was inextricably tied to the Republican Party and the Union’s victory. By Lincoln’s presidency the future of slavery and its geographic expansion had become the insurmountable divide in national politics. Lincoln was not an ardent abolitionist, but still he feared that slavery might become legal again in the states that had outlawed it after the Supreme Court’s Dred Scott decision in 1857. On Levy’s account, Lincoln’s rhetoric alarmed just enough farmers in the lower Midwest of the possibility that slave-owners would encroach upon their livelihoods and buy up the best land. The message succeeded in tipping the 1860 election in favor of the Republicans. As dominant as the “Slave Power” had been, Levy shows that the newly formed Republican Party had inherited the developmental path charted by the defunct Whigs. Its rallying cry of “Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men” solidified a political base across the North’s agricultural regions and manufacturing belt. 

The embeddedness of Republican personnel with Northern industry and finance would be critical to the Union’s triumph in the Civil War. Indeed, Levy writes that “a highly functional political economy of corruption helped the Union win.” Northern businesses were greatly stimulated by the federal government’s demand for goods and materiel, which were shipped to Union soldiers on state-chartered private railroads. The Republican Congress, meanwhile, asserted the state’s ability to direct and propel economic development. The 1861 Morrill Tariff launched a sprawling patchwork of protective tariffs that attached northern industries to Republican political success long after the Union’s victory. The 1862 Homestead Act opened up millions of acres of federal lands to virtually free settlement. The 1862 Morrill Act provided land grants to establish state colleges. And the 1862 and 1864 Pacific Railway Acts sparked the rise of transcontinental travel by chartering the Union Pacific and Central Pacific corporations. Through these assertive forms of state action—protectionist industrialization, state-subsidized settlement and landownership, and the creation of a national market—a Republican developmental coalition was born, one that would modernize the country at the same time that it engendered a new economic hierarchy.

Levy foregrounds the country’s two great, yet deeply flawed, developmental coalitions: the industrializing Republican coalition of the nineteenth century and the New Deal coalition in the twentieth.

Central to that new hierarchy were changes in the U.S. financial system prompted by the Civil War that would only exacerbate regional differences. Ultimately, Levy shows, the Republican Party failed to adopt an inclusive model of development in the wake of slavery’s abolition. The National Banking Acts of 1863 and 1864, which streamlined the path to a single currency, authorized the use of public debt to fund the Union campaign, which ignited the public bond market and made Wall Street a more powerful node in national and international finance. National taxation funded the debt, while the temporary use of greenbacks during the war helped amplify production and commerce. But the expansion of the money supply, along with the possibility of progressive taxation, would prove short-lived. Resumption of the gold standard became a top priority of the new financial elite once the war ended, to the grave detriment of Reconstruction. Returning to gold meant deflation and austerity, which sharply curtailed the fiscal expenditures necessary to secure postbellum Black political freedom in the South. The contraction of investment would deprive the majority of former slaves of the means to obtain land and establish commerce; sharecropping tenancy under the control of former plantation masters became ubiquitous.

As the Gilded Age commenced in the 1870s, the first true industrial titans came into national prominence. Levy highlights how Andrew Carnegie’s reinvention from railroad speculator to steel magnate was representative of the transition to an energy and capital-intensive economy. “Steel,” Levy writes, “multiplied a whole series of backward and forward linkages,” creating the larger social structures whose cohesion increasingly depended on the productivity and profitability generated from fixed capital. 

Carnegie, like other industrialists, benefitted from the protective tariff. He maximized this barrier for European competition by ruthlessly raising labor productivity, closely monitoring costs and output through bookkeeping and timekeeping. Protectionism imposed a hierarchy on the factions and demographics of the Republican coalition, privileging producers of capital goods and intermediate manufacturers while effectively forcing consumers and farmers to support domestic production—including those in the comparatively capital-starved South. Tariff revenue had also supplanted national taxation, heightening regional disparities. This structure became deeply intertwined with Northern urban growth and burgeoning Westward development. As Levy explains, there was significant demand for foodstuffs to feed the expanding class of industrial wage earners, creating additional demand for the domestic manufactures required to improve agricultural production. Even as the Midwestern breadbasket was more exposed to fluctuations in global credit, the tariff regime linked farmers, workers, and industrial capitalists in a chain of amplifying interstate and interregional commerce.

But protectionism could not suppress industrial conflict. Exacerbated by the gold standard, inequality and exploitation became a pressing issue for labor, yet organizing proved fractious. The experience of the Knights of Labor in the 1880s captured the early labor movement’s impediments, both structural and self-made. Strongly producerist, and rooted in an anti-monopoly as opposed to an internationalist politics, the group’s rise predated the consolidation of the wage system that would accompany corporations’ Great Merger Movement of 1895–1904. While the inclusion of women and some Black producers counted among the Knights of Labor’s more egalitarian features, the leadership was explicitly anti-Chinese and supported the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act. Central to their demise, according to Levy, was an inability to reconcile the aspirations of a property-less urban proletariat with the middling property-owning producers who were trying to preserve their economic relevance against the exponential market share of larger and larger corporations. The American Federation of Labor, while excluding small capitalists, subsequently pursued a reformist course that further limited its horizons by avoiding political alliances and the inclusion of Blacks and new immigrants. Levy notes that the labor movement’s turn toward wage system reform presaged the broader emphasis on “income politics” that would dominate twentieth century political economy.

Through assertive forms of state action a Republican developmental coalition was born, one that would modernize the country at the same time that it engendered a new economic hierarchy.

The Populist movement, for its part, represented another challenge to the nexus of industrial and financial capital. Populists—and their predecessors in the Farmers Alliance—promoted an array of policy and organizational innovations, including cooperatives, a plan for the state to subsidize and warehouse crops, railroad regulations to fight monopolies as well as outright state ownership of rail and communications industries, and the use of silver to increase the money supply. The silverite ambitions, in particular, aimed to diminish the power of the liquidity preference of a transnational financial elite and unyoke Western and Southern agriculture from monopolistic practices. The inevitable cycle of booms and busts driven by the gold standard was particularly deleterious for Western farmers, who were already subject to higher interest rates on bank and mortgage loans. The Panic of 1893 caused another severe credit crunch that inflicted a crippling deflation in crop prices; Levy notes that farm incomes dropped 22 percent in the ensuing Depression. 

Yet the Populists were doomed by the very elevation of silver in the 1896 presidential campaign, Levy explains, with their advocacy of inflationary monetary policy eclipsing their other developmental and quasi-statist economic ideas. Through a fateful alliance with the Democratic Party—one that would simultaneously contain populism and alter the national trajectory of Democratic politics down through the New Deal era—the Populists backed William Jennings Bryan, whose evangelism homed in the on the corruption and oligarchy effected by the gold standard. In the election Bryan was trounced by Republican William McKinley, who stressed the connection between domestic industry and widening prosperity. The protective tariff, Levy argues, ultimately precluded the kind of grand alliance between agrarian populists, small Midwestern manufacturers, and Northeastern labor necessary to upend Republican hegemony in federal elections. 

Indeed the tariff provided a credible hedge against a largely untested, alternative path to development, even if it meant tolerating the financial caprices driven by the gold standard. Though no longer vital to promoting infant industries, the tariff politically imbricated a cross-class swath of the economically advanced North. Despite the Gilded Age’s extreme inequality, robust domestic industry was becoming the primary means of employment and was increasingly associated with rising wages. Meanwhile the Supreme Court, Levy notes, was oscillating between anti-monopoly and laissez-faire opinions, but its 1895 ruling that “large manufacturing consolidations were not in violation” of the 1890 Sherman Antitrust Act only advanced the rise of modern corporations and the dependence of workers on steady wages. Support for Republicans was further buttressed through widespread access to Civil War pensions—a crude but politically successful form of welfarism that existed long before Social Security was introduced. 

In the end, a campaign disproportionately centered on “free silver” and the grievances of a mostly rural constituency could not break the Republican coalition, despite the frequent clashes that occurred between capitalists and workers in country’s manufacturing core.

• • •

The New Deal’s Regional Transformations and the Post-Industrial Turn

The third section of the book, “The Age of Control,” examines the New Deal—the summit of state-led investment in the United States—and its aftermath in the postwar economy. During this period the combined activities of regulatory, investment, and relief agencies, Levy shows, had striking regional implications, fundamentally reordering the Republican economic paradigm that had effectively industrialized the North largely at the expense of the South. As Levy tells it, the construction of the New Deal state combined “income politics”—making industrial capitalism “democratic” through state-mediated redistribution and the legal recognition of union rights—with developmental policies that drew from the Populist legacy, which emphasized not just a solid floor for farm incomes but projects that would help obtain regional parity in living standards. The resulting proliferation of public works and state-subsidized credit, particularly in the South and West, would help reinvigorate productivity in the Northern industrial core while radiating private investment outward.

The New Deal had striking regional implications, fundamentally reordering the Republican economic paradigm that had effectively industrialized the North largely at the expense of the South.

These changes were intimately bound up with profound political shifts that been decades in the making, beginning with Woodrow Wilson’s courting of Southern whites. Aided by a Democratic Congress still strongly influenced by agrarian interests while drawing on the reformist agenda of Northeastern Progressives, Wilson’s first administration (1913–1917) introduced income and corporate taxes, reduced tariffs, passed antitrust legislation, and created new avenues to issue credit to farmers In his own first administration (1933–1937), Roosevelt extended that sectional reversal, while consolidating a realignment of the urban working class toward Democrats through Social Security, the Wagner Act, and other measures that strengthened the party’s commitment to building the modern welfare state, which until then had been skeletal at best. (Echoing many scholars of the New Deal, Levy emphasizes that Roosevelt avidly embraced an ethnically and regionally diverse coalition, even while the racist order of the “Solid South” still played a significant role in molding New Deal policies.)

The New Deal was more than a mere reiteration of Populist-infused Wilsonian Progressivism, however. Levy observes that the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933, though invalidated by the Supreme Court two years later, broke with the Democrats’ Jacksonian anti-monopoly heritage. The Great Depression would not end by restoring small proprietors but by inducing industrial capital to revive the male breadwinner model that Fordist consumerism had promised before the crisis. “A new pattern emerged,” Levy writes—one “in which the federal government acted to facilitate capitalist enterprise” at mass production levels, “even while many businessmen railed against its tax and regulatory policies.”

Roosevelt’s primary objective, as a result, was to prop up demand and spur investment, though his mesh of policy experiments, some more adversarial toward capital than others, exceeded the limits on state interventionism that his predecessor Herbert Hoover had assumed. Hoover was a prototypical technocrat; he conceived of an “associational state” premised on more scientific governance and coordination between interest groups. His attempts to combat the Depression were severely restricted because “he would not coerce capitalists to invest,” Levy writes. Hoover was instead beholden to the prevailing doctrine of austerity—reinforced, according to Levy, by an incorrect diagnosis of the 1929 crash. At the turn of the century, the New York Stock Exchange had become the most important market in liquid corporate securities, enlarging the scale of long-term investment in production but also creating new temptations for aggressive speculation. Throughout the 1920s, Wall Street and corporations propagated the idea that stock ownership was “the property anchor of democratic citizenship,” just as landownership had once been, fueling a frenzy of increasingly speculative investment. But what classical economists “diagnosed as overinvestment,” Levy writes, “is better characterized as speculative misinvestment.” Capitalists’ subsequent turn to “precautionary hoarding of liquid assets” only compounded the crisis because “existing capacity”—the combination of productive fixed capital and masses of willing laborers—stagnated, collapsing demand.

In the wake of these developments, Roosevelt’s first critical success was restoring a baseline of consumption. Prices were reflated in part through transformation of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (which Levy discusses at length, emphasizing its public investments and bank recapitalizations), agricultural production controls, and devaluation of the dollar against gold. State-administered financing was complemented by infrastructure projects that provided desperately needed unemployment relief and would slowly help draw capital to the country’s underdeveloped regions. Despite the developmentalist streak of the early New Deal, as exemplified by the Tennessee Valley Authority and Public Works Administration, Levy highlights an important asymmetry between the New Deal’s regulatory arm and its developmental one. Various capital controls—meant to stabilize the financial system, restore demand, and direct capital towards production—were a higher priority than the construction of public housing and the further expansion of public corporations.

Levy pointedly rejects nostalgia for a golden age of welfare capitalism.

By the late 1930s, Levy emphasizes, a newly “politicized liquidity preference” among capitalists had created hostile conditions for the introduction of more egalitarian forms of state-led development. Instead, the government fostered development in residential housing through the Federal Housing Administration, which, among other activities, insured loans and standardized an extended timeframe for mortgages. Thanks to this regulatory framework that encouraged long-term investment, housing construction would flourish in the postwar era, forming yet another pillar of consumerism predicated on male-breadwinners and traditional nuclear families.

Only entry into World War II would allow Roosevelt’s administration to temporarily reorganize the economy on an unprecedented scale. “Prodigious public investments in newly constructed ‘government-owned, contractor-operated’ enterprises drove war production forward,” Levy writes. New plants were finally being built, with the automotive industry, in particular, augmenting production to meet the military’s demand for equipment. Wartime mobilization would finally fulfill New Deal ambitions of full employment, fueling “a third, western industrialization” along the Pacific West while also precipitating the rise of the Sun Belt, whose enhanced economic significance would endure through the Korean War and the permanent national security state that the Cold War engendered.

At the same time, however, the postwar economy inscribed clear limits on New Deal liberalism. The expansive definition of public welfare that the New Deal had once called for—epitomized in Roosevelt’s 1944 proposal for a “Second Bill of Rights”—was displaced by the “fiscal triangle” of the federal government, corporations based around large production sites, and philanthropy. “The United States had no ‘mixed’ economy of public and private enterprise, as many postwar social democratic states did,” Levy writes. “Rather, private interest groups jostled for big government benefits.” Economic policy concentrated on maintaining growth, wielding Keynesian stimulus to counter recessions, while “‘abundance’ became an entitlement of economic citizenship.” It had taken over a half century for political mechanisms to ensure industrialization provided shared prosperity. Yet the structure of the postwar economy would buckle under its perpetuation of racial and gender inequalities, an emboldened drive on part of capital for greater mobility, and various international and domestic economic shocks. 

In his discussion of the transition from the New Deal order to the unstable financialized economy of Reagan and his successors, Levy thus pointedly rejects nostalgia for a golden age of welfare capitalism. Recalling the failures of Reconstruction, he shows that Democratic decisions undermined the economic position of Black Americans just as Great Society legislation was intended to undergird their political equality. Mismanaged “urban renewal” schemes facilitated the relocation of productive investment away from the manufacturing belt, removing a pillar of relative economic opportunity for Black Americans who had settled in Northern cities over the course of the Great Migration. Black Americans had also been long subjected to redlining, and Federal Housing Administration policies amplified economic disparities by channeling real estate investment toward the construction of single-family homes in white suburbs. Levy directly attributes the rise of mass incarceration to these developments. “The failure of twentieth-century liberalism’s economic development agenda,” he writes, “has no more telling statistic than that black men born between 1965 and 1969 were more likely on average to end up in prison than to graduate from college.” Levy is not alone in asserting that the New Deal order carried the seeds of its own destruction. What makes this assessment all the more pointed is the link Levy draws between the New Deal warfare state and the eventual nationalization of Sun Belt politics—and thus the primacy of real estate speculation, liquid financial assets, and ill-compensated service jobs. 

One political implication of Levy’s discussion is that Democrats, not just Republicans, bear responsibility for the depredations of our second Gilded Age.

In the remainder of the book, “The Age of Chaos,” Levy brings these themes up to the present. He probes the post-industrial turn and the bipartisan consensus that actively relocated much of economic policymaking to the Federal Reserve, whose mandate to control inflation has precluded full employment and provided political cover against flat-lining wages and spiking inequality. Eschewing nonspecific talk of neoliberalism, Levy instead speaks more concretely of “Rubinomics,” a reference to Bill Clinton’s Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin—who championed balanced budgets and, along with Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, prioritized investor confidence in global capital markets. Instead of ushering in a new wave of long-term investment, this policy orientation, along with other developments in the global economy, bolstered the rise of asset price inflation, the Internet-fueled capitalization of ideas over infrastructure and equipment, and the broader domestic disinvestment that has accompanied the coupling of the U.S. and Chinese economies. One political implication of Levy’s discussion is that Democrats, not just Republicans, bear responsibility for the depredations of our second Gilded Age.

These developments came to a head in 2008, of course, when the financial crisis spiraled into the Great Recession in “a textbook debt-deflation.” But instead of reviving a robust “fiscal multiplier,” Barack Obama largely embraced a moralistic politics of responsibility. His administration’s stimulus, as many progressive policy experts have concurred, was too cautious, and Obama willingly embraced austerity after the Tea Party wave in 2010. Economic policymaking remained ensconced at the Federal Reserve, but its innovation of quantitative easing, which lowered long-term interest rates, did not spark the reinvestment of corporate profits that was intended. It would take the election of Donald Trump and a new economic crisis brought on by the pandemic to provoke acknowledgment among Democratic elites (including Biden) that the Obama administration’s stimulus efforts fell short. Given the speed with which the Biden administration has announced its economic policies, it seems that at least some policymakers now regard Obama’s tenure as proof that long expansions do not ensure equitable recoveries.

• • •

As a single-volume history of the full sweep of U.S. capitalism, Ages of American Capitalism succeeds in large part because of Levy’s focus on the competing objectives that drive economic policymaking at the highest levels of political power. It is also a history layered with cultural and social detail, providing a window into the struggles and goals of working-class Americans, the comforts and constraints of middle-class life, and the obsessive visions of the country’s more consequential economic elites.

Ages of American Capitalism decisively demonstrates that capital does not work in the interest of the public without state mechanisms that both ramp up and set parameters for investment activity.

There are necessary limits to a work of this scope and focus, of course. The international context, for instance, is mostly tied to discussions of monetary policy and credit fluctuations. Another relative weakness is that the book only indirectly engages the concept of racial capitalism, a lens increasingly central to discussions of the history of slavery and capitalism. (“I have no room here to do justice to the debates” over the relationship between capitalism and slavery, Levy acknowledges. “This book’s starting point is capital. Slavery is an ancient institution that has exhibited many common characteristics over centuries, but capitalization is not one of them.”) Levy’s exposition of the wealth brutally extracted from slavery occupies a large part of the first half of the book, and it greatly illuminates the divergent regional paths of U.S. development. But missing from the text is a head-on discussion of the critique, advanced by Cedric J. Robinson and others, that racist forms of subjugation and hierarchy were intrinsic to capitalist development, not systems that coevolved out of political contingencies. More generally, though racial injustice is clearly a running theme of Levy’s analysis, Black political agency and economic life are more marginally addressed. Similarly, while Levy occasionally reflects on how industrial capitalism accentuated the “spheres” of domestic life and the political marginalization of women’s labor, the structure of the book only allows so much attention to be devoted to the forms of exclusion and exploitation that accompanied capitalist development.

Readers may also note that the material realm of U.S. economic life recedes as Levy narrows his focus on liquidity and global capital flows. Levy gives a fascinating discussion of Houston’s economic growth in the 1970s, for example, showing how it exemplified the creation of a new tier of fast, conspicuous consumption and low-wage care work driven by a surge of women into the workforce. But Levy does not take stock of the gentrification and displacement that would roil resurgent East and West Coast cities. Nor does he probe in meaningful detail the conditions that led some Rust Belt regions to vote for Trump in 2016. In effect, the book ends before Trump’s rise.

In most respects, however, the book is a valuable and engrossing contribution. One of its most significant achievements is to illustrate the value of viewing the history of the United States as that of a developing country. There is a growing field of scholarship on this subject, including works such as Martin J. Sklar’s The United States as a Developing Country (1992), Richard Franklin Bensel’s The Political Economy of American Industrialization, 1877–1900 (2000), and Monica Prasad’s The Land of Too Much: American Abundance and the Paradox of Poverty (2012), as well as more recent interventions such as an article published last year by Noam Maggor and Stefan Link. In different but forceful ways, this historiography works to dispel lingering myths about U.S. entrepreneurial exceptionalism. A central conclusion uniting this work is that vast resources and economic freedom alone do not explain the combined agricultural and industrial takeoff from the mid-nineteenth century through the ascent of Fordism. The developmental lens instead emphasizes how ideological beliefs and political actors structured the course of industrialization. It was not the supposedly natural incentives of capital formation that created relentless growth that ultimately overwhelmed international rivals. On the contrary, it was political decisions, and their varying popular support, that determined the pace of development, the rise and fall of the U.S. welfare state, and the reach of American economic hegemony.

If Biden truly intends to establish a more just and egalitarian economic order, he would do well to consult both the achievements and the tragedies of U.S. development documented in Levy’s book.

In keeping with the disciplinary orientation of the field academic historians call the “history of capitalism,” Levy upholds the centrality of political initiative to economic development. Through painstaking accumulation of evidence over several centuries, Ages of American Capitalism decisively demonstrates that capital does not work in the interest of the public without state mechanisms that both ramp up and set parameters for investment activity. At the same time, Levy shows that political initiative is also fallible, marked by biases or outright prejudices, difficult compromises, and sometimes a lack of foresight. In this regard, Levy’s account of the imbalances and inequities of late nineteenth-century industrialization is especially instructive, as it provides new resources for explaining how the Democratic Party transformed into the party of New Deal liberalism. In doing so, Levy significantly enriches our understanding of the rise of the early Republican Party as a world historical event.

What might this long history augur for Biden’s vision of the U.S. economy? His victory over Trump improved margins with affluent suburbanites but raised doubts over the ability of Democrats to mobilize working-class voters. If Biden truly intends to establish a more just and egalitarian economic order, he would do well to consult both the achievements and the tragedies of U.S. development documented in Levy’s book.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/portrait-of-the-united-states-as-a-developing-country/feed/ 0
A Short History of Living Longer’ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-short-history-of-living-longer/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-short-history-of-living-longer/#respond Thu, 20 May 2021 06:37:13 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/?p=567 Courtesy of Nutopia ALSO SEE: 2021 NASCAR TV Schedules on FOX Sports & NBC Sports All Times Eastern. PBS programming varies regionally. Tuesday, May 11 Extra Life: A Short History of Living LongerPBS, 8pmNew Series!The first episode in this new four-part series that examines the lessons learned from previous outbreaks of communicable diseases is “Vaccines.” […]]]>


Courtesy of Nutopia

ALSO SEE: 2021 NASCAR TV Schedules on FOX Sports & NBC Sports

All Times Eastern. PBS programming varies regionally.

Tuesday, May 11

Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer
PBS, 8pm
New Series!

The first episode in this new four-part series that examines the lessons learned from previous outbreaks of communicable diseases is “Vaccines.” It explores the history and use of vaccination, from early practices in Africa introduced to America during the slave trade and Thomas Jefferson’s clinical trials to the first anti-vaccine protests in the 19th century and COVID-19 today.

TCM Morning & Afternoon Movies: Tab Hunter
TCM, beginning at 8:45am
Catch a Classic!

Movie star Tab Hunter (born Arthur Andrew Kelm) embodied the apparently simple, clean-cut, good-looking, all-American “boy next door” persona that many audiences wanted in their male pop-culture stars of the 1950s and early ’60s. Yet like many celebrities, especially at that time, a more complicated person lay beneath the surface. In Hunter’s case, the gay actor publicly kept himself in the closet as he reigned for a while as a top heartthrob during the final years of the studio era. This morning and afternoon on Turner Classic Movies, check out films representing the man across this spectrum. Most of today’s films come from Hunter’s peak of movie stardom during the 1950s. The day begins with The Sea Chase (1955), a World War II drama led by John Wayne. This is followed by two 1956 films costarring Natalie Wood, the Western The Burning Hills and the romantic comedy The Girl He Left Behind; Lafayette Escadrille, a 1958 war film also featuring Clint Eastwood in an early supporting role; and The Golden Arrow (1962), one of the many Italian films Hunter made during the ’60s. The lineup concludes with the 2015 documentary Tab Hunter Confidential, which Hunter’s longtime partner, producer Allan Glaser, adapted from Hunter’s 2005 memoir in which he confirmed the rumors of his sexuality. — Jeff Pfeiffer

Pooch Perfect: “A Dog for All Seasons”
ABC, 8pm

Each team designs its pooch based on a season. By the end of this episode, the competing dog groomers will know the final trio of fur-ocious teams angling to take home a trophy and $100,000 (and maybe some treats?) in next week’s finale.

NCIS: “Unseen Improvements”
CBS, 8pm

In the new episode “Unseen Improvements,” NCIS tracks a stolen laptop to the uncle of a young boy, Phineas (guest star Jack Fisher), who is Gibbs’ (Mark Harmon) former neighbor.

The Flash: “Timeless”
The CW, 8pm

After a devastating betrayal, Barry (Grant Gustin) turns to Timeless Wells (Tom Cavanagh) for help. Meanwhile, Iris (Candice Patton) leads Team Citizen down a dangerous road in search of answers, and Cisco (Carlos Valdes) confides his biggest fear to Kamilla (guest star Victoria Park).

The Resident: “Finding Family”
FOX, 8pm

In the new episode “Finding Family,” Billie (Jessica Lucas) takes full control of Nic’s (Emily VanCamp) baby shower, but a secret she’s been hiding changes everything.

The Voice: “Live Top 17 Results”
NBC, 8pm Live

Four artists, one from each team, are revealed as safe by America’s votes. Each coach then selects one more artist to move forward; the artist with the next highest votes from each team will compete in the Wildcard Instant Save for the top nine’s last spot.

black-ish: “Snitches Get Boundaries”
ABC, 9pm

After one of Dre’s secrets with Pops is spilled to Ruby, he realizes that his relationships with each of his parents have changed since they got married and he no longer knows in whom to confide. Meanwhile, Bow surprises Jack and Diane with a brand-new car and tries to teach the twins how to drive.

Supergirl: “Fear Knot”
The CW, 9pm

As the Super Friends brave the Phantom Zone to bring Supergirl (Melissa Benoist) home, each member of the team is confronted by visions of their worst fear.

Chopped: “Martha Rules: Grand Finale!”
Food Network, 9pm

In the finale of the Martha Rules tournament, Martha Stewart pulls out all the stops to make the road to $50,000 extra challenging. In the appetizer round, the chefs wonder what’s up when they find footwear in the ingredient basket.

Prodigal Son: “Sun and Fun”
FOX, 9pm

In the new episode “Sun and Fun,” Malcolm (Tom Payne) gets kicked off the case of a serial killer on the run.

The Crime of the Century, Part 2
HBO, 9pm

The second and final part of Alex Gibney’s documentary shines a spotlight on the mass marketing of the synthetic opioid fentanyl and examines the connections between drug manufacturers and government policy. While America’s silent epidemic was killing 40 people a day, Insys Therapeutics, an upstart opioid manufacturer of fentanyl, continued to bribe doctors to overprescribe. A complex scheme to defraud the insurance companies existed side by side with fraudulent marketing tactics while lawmakers continued to turn a blind eye to the implications of a complex pipeline that delivers billions of pills around the country.

This Is Us: “The Music and the Mirror”
NBC, 9pm

Beth (Susan Kelechi Watson) navigates her career path; Kate (Chrissy Metz) and Toby (Chris Sullivan) face unexpected issues; a run-in with someone from his past gives Kevin (Justin Hartley) pause.

Little People, Big World
TLC, 9pm
Season Premiere!

As Matt reimagines how to run the family business, Zach contemplates co-owning and running the farm with his dad. Is he ready to handle all that would come with living and working with his father? Meanwhile, after moving out of the farmhouse for good, Amy and her fiancé Chris start planning their upcoming wedding. But what happens when they realize they don’t share the same vision for their big day? And Zach and Tori see firsthand the little victories and big challenges that go along with raising two babies with dwarfism.

Mixed-ish: “Walk This Way”
ABC, 9:30pm

Paul tries to become better friends with Denise, so he uses his white privilege to help her out with her errands. Meanwhile, Rainbow, Jonah and Santi are selling chocolate bars for their school fundraiser, but they pick up some questionable sales tactics.

Big Sky: “Bitter Roots”
ABC, 10pm

When Scarlet gets an alarming call that her sister is missing, Ronald realizes just how twisted his situation has become and must decide his next move. Meanwhile, Cassie, Jenny, Gil and Rosie find themselves in a whole mess of trouble on the ranch, forced to face off against the worst of the Kleinsasser bunch. But this team is tough and even the strongest family trees can fall. Guest starring is Omar Metwally as Mark Lindor, Ryan Dorsey as Rand Kleinsasser, Britt Robertson as Cheyenne Kleinsasser, Michelle Forbes as Margaret Kleinsasser and Kyle Schmid as John Wayne Kleinsasser.

Mayans M.C.
FX, 10pm
Season Finale!

Bishop (scene-stealer Michael Irby), the Mayans M.C. Santo Padre Charter president, makes his move to become the one and only king. But when the dust settles, who will wear the crown? And where will brothers EZ (JD Pardo) and Angel (Clayton Cardenas) fit in?

America’s Book of Secrets: “The Secret Space Program”
History, 10pm
Season Premiere!

On December 20, 2019, the newest branch of the armed services was established — Space Force. But nearly two decades earlier in 2002, a man named Gary McKinnon claimed he had discovered evidence that a secret military space program already existed … after hacking top-secret Pentagon and NASA computers. Does this suggest that the U.S. has a much greater presence in space than the public is aware? Could we even have occupied bases on the moon and Mars?

New Amsterdam: “Pressure Drop”
NBC, 10pm

Max (Ryan Eggold) implements sweeping changes to hospital sustainability practices; Bloom (Janet Montgomery) returns from vacation; Reynolds (Jocko Sims) treats a young patient with deadly heat stroke; and Iggy (Tyler Labine) discovers a dangerous situation with a former patient.

Wednesday, May 12

Clipped
discovery+
New Series!

This six-episode topiary competition series hosted by Michael Urie follows seven real-life “Edward Scissorhandses” who create breathtaking sculptures out of meticulously trimmed shrubbery, plants and flowers — designing colorful, larger-than-life, living works of art. Throughout the series, competitors will face high-stakes challenges and have their topiary masterpieces evaluated by lead judge and gardening icon Martha Stewart and an expert panel of judges, including critically acclaimed landscape architect Fernando Wong and lifestyle, landscape and horticultural expert Chris Lambton. Each week, they decide who makes the cut, who gets clipped and, in the end, who is crowned as the top topiarist who wins $50,000 cash.

Oxygen
Netflix
Original Film!

This French survival thriller tells the story of a young woman (Mélanie Laurent, Inglourious Basterds) who wakes up in a cryogenic pod and doesn’t remember who she is or how she ended up there. As she’s running out of oxygen, she must rebuild her memory to find a way out of her nightmare.

The Upshaws
Netflix
New Series!

In this comedy cocreated by Regina Hicks and executive producer/costar Wanda Sykes, Bennie Upshaw (Mike Epps, also an executive producer), the head of a Black working-class family in Indianapolis, is a charming, well-intentioned mechanic and lifelong mess just trying his best to step up and care for his family — wife Regina (Kim Fields), their two young daughters (Khali Daniya-Renee Spraggins, Journey Christine) and firstborn son (Jermelle Simon); and the teenage son (Diamond Lyons) he fathered with another woman (Gabrielle Dennis) — and tolerate his sardonic sister-in-law (Sykes), all without a blueprint for success.

Kids Say the Darndest Things: “Love Chat/Double Trouble”
CBS, 8pm
Guest Star Alert!

Tiffany Haddish and a wise 8-year-old dish out relationship advice on a special podcast, and Tiffany teams up with Cedric the Entertainer to cause double the trouble when they chat with identical twins in the new episode “Love Chat/Double Trouble.”

The Masked Singer: “The Quarter Finals — Five Fan Favorites”
FOX, 8pm

The remaining five performers take to the stage with the goal of reaching the semifinals in the new episode “The Quarter Finals — Five Fan Favorites.”

Married at First Sight: “Real Life Starts Now”
Lifetime, 8pm
Season Finale!

The journey for five couples who were married at first sight comes to a shocking and dramatic conclusion, as some choose to stay together, others choose to divorce and one refuses to decide.

Chicago Med: “A Red Pill, a Blue Pill”
NBC, 8pm

Third-year med students begin their rotation in the ED, and Maggie (Marlyne Barrett) keeps a careful eye on one of them. Meanwhile, Natalie (Torrey DeVitto) — whose mom’s health takes another decline — tries to cover up how she broke the rules to treat her.

TCM Spotlight: Order in the Court: “Courtroom Comedies”
TCM, beginning at 8pm
Catch a Classic!

May’s TCM Spotlight is back in session with another evening of films centered around courtroom themes. Tonight’s focus is on comedies set at least in part in the judicial system, and first on the docket is Adam’s Rib (1949), the classic romantic comedy starring Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn as married lawyers who find themselves opposing each other in court. Married couple and frequent screenwriting collaborators Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin received Oscar nominations for their screenplay. Next is Perfect Strangers (1950), a comedy/drama starring Ginger Rogers and Dennis Morgan as jurors who fall in love while sequestered during a murder trial; Ladies of the Jury (1932), a pre-Code comedy; George Stevens’ Cary Grant and Jean Arthur-led comedy/drama The Talk of the Town (1942), which received seven Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and two nods for its story and screenplay; and the comedy The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947), starring Grant, Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple. — Jeff Pfeiffer

Home Economics: “The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire: An Oral History (Used), $11”
ABC, 8:30pm

Connor invites the siblings to a party he’s throwing for his ex-wife, Emily. While he feels the need to prove that he is cool with their divorce, he is not the only one in the competitive spirit. Tom and Marina try to prove to each other that they still have game, while Sarah finds the perfect solution to the fact that she’s a bad gift-giver. Guest starring is Lidia Porto as Lupe and Justine Lupe as Emily.

The Conners: “Jeopardé, Sobrieté, and Infidelité”
ABC, 9pm

Darlene makes a decision about her trip to Hawaii, leading to a heated encounter with Barb. Meanwhile, Becky gives a presentation on addiction to Mark’s class. Guest starring is Candice Bergen as Barb, Katey Sagal as Louise, Estelle Parsons as Bev, Nat Faxon as Neville and Brian Austin Green as Jeff.

SEAL Team: “Hollow at the Core”
CBS, 9pm

Bravo Team is tasked with a covert mission to infiltrate a Boko Haram camp, hack its data network and rescue an American hostage in the new episode “Hollow at the Core.”

Nancy Drew: “The Celestial Visitor”
The CW, 9pm

The stage is set for a potential spinoff when Nancy (Kennedy McMann) helps billionaire inventor Tom Swift (Tian Richards) investigate a case of creepy proportions. “His bag of tricks — technology and gadgets, urban sophistication and enormous wealth and swagger — those don’t work against ghosts,” exec producer Noga Landau says with a laugh.

Bargain Block: “Safari and Country Estates”
HGTV, 9pm

A hoarder’s den and a house of mirrors have Keith Bynum and Evan Thomas shaking their heads, but they rise to the challenge with an animal-print motif and a quick design flip.

The Hills: New Beginnings
MTV, 9pm
Season Premiere!

After a year of lockdowns and lost time, the cast of Hollywood’s most iconic friend group is reuniting. This season finds them at a crossroads and their lives tested like never before. While some struggle with the financial strains from the global pandemic and rebuilding businesses, others are navigating through rocky relationships, struggling with addiction as well as their mental and physical health. From a highly publicized divorce and rekindling former flames to starting new families and surprise pregnancies, all bets are off this season.

Chicago Fire: “What Comes Next”
NBC, 9pm

A fire breaks out at a pet food factory, and Casey (Jesse Spencer) and Severide (Taylor Kinney) help the owner get to the bottom of it. Meanwhile, the annual garage sale takes place at 51, and everyone is on edge.

Call Your Mother: “The Raines Games”
ABC, 9:30pm

Jean fears her family is drifting apart so she brings everyone together for a game night that doesn’t go as planned. Guest starring is Sherri Shepherd as Sharon and Derrick Anthony King as Nick.

A Million Little Things: “Listen”
ABC, 10pm

In response to the killing of George Floyd, the group of friends are forced to reevaluate their own racial biases and take to the streets of Boston. Rome opts out in favor of his mental health and has a candid conversation with his father about how to effect change. Guest starring is Terry Chen as Alan, Adam Swain as Tyrell, Lou Beatty Jr. as Walter, Andrea Savage as Dr. Stacy and Karen Robinson as Florence Davis.

Food Paradise: “Noodle Nirvana”
Cooking Channel, 10pm

Now this is using your noodle: Some of the intriguing pasta-bilities you’ll see are spaghetti in a cone (New York City) and ramen noodles in a burrito (Venice Beach, California).

See No Evil: “Gold Pontiac”
Investigation Discovery, 10pm

When two women are gunned down outside their Tulsa apartment complex one morning in 2014, surveillance footage reveals a key clue: the killer lying in wait in a gold Pontiac.

Chicago P.D.: “Safe”
NBC, 10pm

After a series of brutal home invasion robberies, Upton (Tracy Spiridakos) immerses herself in the case and finds herself caught between Voight (Jason Beghe) and Halstead (Jesse Lee Soffer).

Thursday, May 13

The Rich and the Ruthless
BET+
Season Premiere!

This behind-the-scenes, dram-com soap that follows the fictional story of the family behind the first Black-owned daytime drama on broadcast television — who stop at nothing to stay in power — returns for its fourth season at its new home on BET’s streaming service, BET+ (the show’s first three seasons streamed on the Urban Movie Channel service, which has recently rebranded as ALLBLK).

Restaurant Recovery
discovery+
Season Finale!

The series in which restaurateur Todd Graves and his celebrity friends help save family-owned restaurants concludes its first season with this episode.

Castlevania
Netflix
Season Premiere/Series Finale!

In the epic fourth and final season of the animated series based on the computer game franchise, Wallachia collapses into chaos as factions clash — some attempting to take control, others attempting to bring Dracula back from the dead. Nobody is who they seem, and nobody can be trusted in these end times.

Young Sheldon: “The Wild and Woolly World of Nonlinear Dynamics”
CBS, 8pm
Season Finale!

Solving a challenging physics problem and annoying his professors is a typical day for 11-year-old East Texas Tech freshman Sheldon Cooper (Iain Armitage). But in the sitcom’s fourth-season ender, when twin sister Missy (Raegan Revord) experiences her first real heartbreak, here’s hoping the brainiac can pause the logical thinking and just lend a shoulder to cry on.

Walker: “Freedom”
The CW, 8pm

Walker (Jared Padalecki) and Geri (guest star Odette Annable) are both unsure of their feelings for each other after their kiss, and things get very complicated when Hoyt (guest star Matt Barr) comes home from prison. However, the welcome home party is interrupted when Micki (Lindsey Morgan) and Walker get word that Clint West (guest star Austin Nichols) is on the run.

No Demo Reno: “Dream House Redo”
HGTV, 8pm

Homeowners who still consider their house of 20 years to be their dream home feel it has become outdated and ask Jenn Todryk to give it a major facelift. Next, Jenn works with a couple who have always put their kids’ needs before their own to create the bedroom and bathroom suite of their dreams.

Manifest: “Bogey”
NBC, 8pm

Ben (Josh Dallas) reunites with a duplicitous foe; Mick (Melissa Roxburgh) and Zeke’s (Matt Long) dinner party with Jared (J.R. Ramirez) and his new girlfriend is halted by a calling that ignites the Stone siblings to save the life of one of their own; Olive’s (Luna Blaise) friendship with Levi (Will Peltz) blossoms but is tested.

Dream State: California in the Movies — Part I
TCM, beginning at 8pm
Catch a Classic!

Being the home state for Hollywood, it’s not surprising that California has found itself frequently used as a filming backdrop and/or story setting for scores of classic movies. With its “Dream State”-themed evenings, beginning tonight and concluding next Thursday, Turner Classic Movies airs a number of memorable films with a California setting. Tonight’s lineup begins by heading to the shore with Gidget (1959), starring Sandra Dee in the title role of the comedy that was one of the earliest teen “beach” films and introduced California’s surfing culture to a wide audience. Next, head inland a bit to Beverly Hills in Shampoo (1975), Hal Ashby’s Oscar-winning comedy/drama starring Warren Beatty as a successful but dissatisfied hairdresser to the stars. Then, in What Price Hollywood? (1932), the title city is the backdrop for a drama about an aspiring actress’ (Constance Bennett) experiences with various characters in the town. Hollywood is again the setting for the next film, The Big Picture (1989), a comedy starring Kevin Bacon as a Midwesterner who finds himself suddenly thrust into the Tinseltown world after winning a prestigious student film contest. Finally, the darker side of sunny Los Angeles and its surrounding area is the focus of one of the quintessential “California noir” films, The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946), starring Lana Turner and John Garfield. — Jeff Pfeiffer

United States of Al: “Car/Motar”
CBS, 8:30pm

In the new episode “Car/Motar,” when Riley (Parker Young) and Al (Adhir Kalyan) negotiate a deal for Al’s new car, they learn the hard way that they are not adept at finances and contracts.

Mom
CBS, 9pm
Series Finale!

The critically lauded comedy series that has explored the power of family, friendship and forgiveness to overcome addiction and personal strife signs off after eight seasons. Find out how things end up for Bonnie (Allison Janney), Jill (Jaime Pressly) and Marjorie (Mimi Kennedy), and see if Christy (Anna Faris) returns for a final appearance in the series finale episode “My Kinda People and the Big To-Do.”

Restaurant Impossible: “Saving an American Dream”
Food Network, 9pm

Robert Irvine faces the most difficult challenge of his career when he must save an immigrant’s American dream of holding on to her Las Vegas restaurant, Burnt Offerings. Robert must find unique ways to raise revenue and cut costs to keep the dream alive.

Last Man Standing: “Murder, She Wanted”
FOX, 9pm

Mandy (Molly McCook) gets jealous after Mike (Tim Allen) spends time with Ryan (Jordan Masterson) at a marketing retreat in the new episode “Murder, She Wanted.”

Flip or Flop: “Smelly Time Capsule”
HGTV, 9pm

Tarek El Moussa and Christina Haack make a costly decision to open up the floor plan on a stinky 1950s home in Whittier, California. The duo encounter extensive termite and water damage as they try to turn this disgusting and dated house into a modern money maker.

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: “Trick-Rolled at the Moulin”
NBC, 9pm

The SVU searches for three women suspected of drugging and robbing wealthy men, and the case leads to personal connections for both Benson (Mariska Hargitay) and Kat (Jamie Gray Hyder). Christopher Meloni guest-stars.

Paranormal Caught on Camera: “Kentucky Poltergeist and More”
Travel Channel, 9pm

A Kentucky woman hires an empath to rid her home of a pesky poltergeist; a terrifying creature holes up in a barn at night; and a Russian cosmonaut spots a UFO over Antarctica.

B Positive
CBS, 9:30pm
Season Finale!

Before their surgeries, Gina (Annaleigh Ashford) looks for a new apartment while Drew (Thomas Middleditch) celebrates his last day of dialysis in the Season 1 finale “Life Expectancy.”

Rebel: “Heart Burned”
ABC, 10pm

Rebel goes to great lengths to help save Helen’s life after she’s denied her surgery, and continues to push Cruz to negotiate the recall and study of the heart valve. Meanwhile, Cassidy and Lana try to help Luke when his personal life jeopardizes his career and reputation. Elsewhere, Cruz gets close to someone new. Guest starring is Mo McRae as Amir, Mary McDonnell as Helen, Adam Arkin as Mark Duncan, Abigail Spencer as Misha, Dan Bucatinsky as professor Jason Erickson and Sharon Lawrence as Angela.

Clarice: “Silence Is Purgatory”
CBS, 10pm

In the new episode “Silence Is Purgatory,” ViCAP links the River Murders to a pharmaceutical company, and Clarice (Rebecca Breeds) seeks help from Julia Lawson (guest star Jen Richards), the corporate accountant for the company, who refuses to work with the FBI.

Law & Order: Organized Crime: “An Inferior Product”
NBC, 10pm

Stabler (Christopher Meloni) faces the consequences of a failed drug bust; Bell (Danielle Moné Truitt) is forced to choose between the job and her family; and Gina (Charlotte Sullivan) gets an unexpected visitor. Mariska Hargitay and Demore Barnes guest-star.

Dark Side of Football
Vice, 10pm
New Series!

“I enjoy inflicting pain,” says ex-NFL star Tony Casillas in this football version of Vice’s blood-and-guts Dark Side docuseries formula, with tough guys such as Bill Romanowski weighing in on players’ off-camera violence.

Friday, May 14

The Underground Railroad
Amazon Prime Video
New Limited Series!

Oscar winner Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) is showrunner and executive producer, and directed all 10 episodes, of this limited series set in the antebellum South and based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Colson Whitehead. Newcomer Thuso Mbedu stars as Cora Randall, who makes a desperate bid for freedom after escaping a Georgia plantation. After hearing rumors about the Underground Railroad, Cora discovers that it is no mere metaphor, but an actual railroad full of engineers and conductors, and a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil.

High School Musical: The Musical: The Series
Disney+
Season Premiere!

In Season 2, the East High Wildcats, who are preparing to perform Beauty and the Beast as their spring musical, face off against rival school North High to win a prestigious and cutthroat student theater competition. Wigs are snatched, loyalties are tested and ballads are belted. The season also features brand-new solos written by Olivia Rodrigo and Joshua Bassett, and includes guest appearances from Derek Hough, Olivia Rose Keegan, Roman Banks, Andrew Barth Feldman and Asher Angel.

Ferry
Netflix
Original Film!

This film is a prequel to the Dutch-Flemish Netflix crime drama series Undercover. The story starts in 2006 in the city of Amsterdam, where Ferry Bouman (Frank Lammers, reprising his series role) works for drug lord Ralph Brink, a powerful criminal and Ferry’s mentor. After years of absence, a job for Brink finds Ferry returning to his beloved Brabant, which he had fled many years before. The difficult reunion with his estranged family, the return to the camper life he had forsaken and meeting his charming neighbor Danielle (Elise Schaap, also returning to her series role) all gradually crawl under Ferry’s skin.

Move to Heaven
Netflix
New Series!

This inspiring Korean drama follows Geu-ru (Tang Jun-sang), a young man with Asperger’s syndrome, and Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon), who suddenly finds himself as Geu-ru’s guardian. The two work as “trauma cleaners,” a group of people clearing out the last possessions of the deceased and uncovering stories that are left behind. Geu-ru and Sang-gu join hands to help the final move of those who have passed away, and deliver their messages to loved ones.

The Woman in the Window
Netflix
Original Film!

In this suspenseful psychological thriller based on the bestselling novel adapted by Tracy Letts, shocking secrets are revealed and nothing and no one is what they seem. Anna Fox (Amy Adams) is an agoraphobic child psychologist who finds herself keeping tabs on the picture-perfect family across the street through the windows of her New York City brownstone. Letts, Gary Oldman, Anthony Mackie, Fred Hechinger, Wyatt Russell, Brian Tyree Henry, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Julianne Moore also star.

Night Gallery: “Certain Shadows on the Wall”
Comet, 12:15pm

This creepy 1970 segment of Rod Serling’s horror anthology may have wormed its way into your brain as The One Where Agnes Moorehead Dies in Her Sickbed but Then Her Shadow Appears on the Parlor Wall and Won’t Go Away.

Shark Tank
ABC, 8pm

A pair of entrepreneurs from Industry, California, pitch their innovative system which helps create a custom pillow based on your unique sleep profile. Two entrepreneurs from Ipswitch, Massachusetts, believe they’ve hit a hole-in-one with their natural and fun alternative to a traditional sport. Entrepreneurs from Plymouth, Michigan, take outdoor dining to another level when they float their grilling product idea by the Sharks, while a husband-and-wife duo from Boise, Idaho, stretch the boundaries of what it means to wear functional shoes with ease. The Sharks in this episode are Mark Cuban, Kevin O’Leary, Lori Greiner, Robert Herjavec and guest Shark Daniel Lubetzky.

The Goonies
AMC, 8pm
Catch a Classic!

Richard Donner directed this fun Steven Spielberg production about a group of kids in Oregon desperately searching for a hidden pirate treasure to help save their homes from foreclosure. While The Goonies didn’t get anywhere near matching the other Spielberg-produced film of the summer of 1985, Back to the Future, at the box office, it still did well and remains a cult favorite among those who were a certain age when they first saw it in the theater. Its young main cast of heroes features names that have remained familiar as they went on to grownup acting roles, including Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Corey Feldman and Martha Plimpton. — Jeff Pfeiffer

Chopped: “Teen Redeem”
Cooking Channel, 8pm

Four teen chefs return to the kitchen with victory and redemption on their minds. The teens get creative with crab, use a novel ingredient, and must hustle to make sweet creations from cookies and peanut butter toast.

Pride
FX, 8pm
New Miniseries!

This six-part documentary series chronicles the struggle for LGBTQ+ civil rights in America decade-by-decade beginning with the 1950s. The first three episodes air back-to-back tonight, with the remaining three episodes airing Friday, May 21.

My Lottery Dream Home: “King and Queen of M’Orlando”
HGTV, 8pm

David Bromstad gets to stay at home to help Lee and Lacherrica find their dream home in Orlando, Florida. Lacherrica scratched up the best one-year wedding anniversary ever, when she hit the top prize of $1 million. It means they can finally leave apartment living behind, and buy their first home, and they’re aiming big. They want four bedrooms and three bathrooms!

Mommy’s Deadly Con Artist
LMN, 8pm
Original Film!

After Denise (Jackée Harry) loses her husband, she is determined to find who did it, which leads her to tracking down Stephanie and her “mother.” But things are not as they appear when a wealthy family stands to lose everything at the hands of this mother and daughter tandem. Also stars Dey Young, Chelsea Gilson, Rib Hillis, Andrew Phillip Rodgers and Sophia Katarina.

The Blacklist: “Ivan Stepanov”
NBC, 8pm

Red (James Spader) tries desperately to rescue an old friend at all costs, while Liz (Megan Boone) and Townsend (Reg Rogers) conduct an interrogation.

Happily Whatever: “Family Ties or Unleashed Adventure”
HGTV, 8:30pm

A recently married couple is eager to purchase their first home and plant roots. Having the freedom to live anywhere, the couple is torn between staying near family and friends in their beloved hometown of Los Angeles or making a radical move to Colorado.

Blue Bloods
CBS, 9pm
Season Finale!

The last time the Reagans saw Detective Joe Hill (Will Hochman), he reneged on a promised visit to Sunday dinner. The newly discovered grandson of police commissioner Frank Reagan (Tom Selleck) returns front and center, though, in tonight’s intense two-hour Season 11 ender. The story opens as Joe’s uncle Danny (Donnie Wahlberg) tracks down a weapon used in multiple crimes. The trail leads to a pair of illegal gun dealers … one of them Joe, working undercover. Unbeknownst to the family, he’s been loaned out to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to infiltrate a crew that is buying and selling guns and drugs up and down the East Coast. (ER favorite Gloria Reuben, who played Selleck’s love interest in several of his Jesse Stone TV movies, guest-stars as the senior ATF agent overseeing Joe.)

We Are Family: Songs of Hope and Unity
PBS, 10pm

We’re even smiling at this American Pops Orchestra concert’s set list, with “You’ve Got a Friend” (sung by Broadway’s Laura Osnes) and “Feeling Good” (The Voice’s Rayshun LaMarr). Judith Light hosts.

Saturday, May 15

Popeye and Pink Panther’s Party
MeTV, 7am

Henry Mancini’s jazzy theme plays the Pink Panther onto MeTV’s Saturday morning classic toon lineup,
where the cool cat joins Popeye.

NTT IndyCar Series: GMR Grand Prix
NBC, 2:30pm Live

The NTT IndyCar Series is at Indianapolis Motor Speedway as drivers battle it out in the GMR Grand Prix on the Brickyard’s 14-turn road course.

Major League Baseball
FS1, beginning at 4pm Live

Saturday MLB action on FS1 features the Oakland A’s at the Minnesota Twins, followed by the St. Louis Cardinals at the San Diego Padres.

Horse Racing: 146th Preakness Stakes
NBC, 5pm Live

The Kentucky Derby winner will try to keep its Triple Crown hopes alive today at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore for the running of the 146th Preakness Stakes.

NBA Basketball: Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony
ESPN, 5:30pm

There will be nary a dry eye as Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Kobe Bryant is posthumously inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, along with other NBA greats Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett, Eddie Sutton and Rudy Tomjanovich.

The Manchurian Candidate
TCM, 5:45pm
Catch a Classic!

Eerie, shocking, daring, thrilling and mesmerizing, John Frankenheimer’s 1962 blend of Cold War paranoia and sly satire is one of the finest political thrillers ever made. Patrician Korean War vet Raymond Shaw (Laurence Harvey) returns to his politically placed family a Medal of Honor winner for his combat bravery. Now, however, his former commanding officer, Ben Marco (Frank Sinatra), is plagued by strange dreams of their time in Red Chinese custody. As Marco searches for the answer to what really happened to them there, he discovers threads of a diabolical plot orchestrated by the utterly ruthless Mrs. Iselin — portrayed in a Best Supporting Actress-nominated performance by Angela Lansbury; if you only know the actress as kindly Jessica Fletcher or a singing teapot, prepare to have your breath taken away by her commandingly villainous presence here. The sinister plan involves Iselin’s son, Shaw; her senator husband (James Gregory); and a secret cabal of enemy leaders. Janet Leigh and Henry Silva costar in the film, which also received an Oscar nomination for its editing. — Jeff Pfeiffer

China: Nature’s Ancient Kingdom
BBC America, 8pm
New Series!

This three-part nature series explores China’s national park project that has 10 sites dedicated to protecting the country’s rarest species and delicate ecosystems. The series unveils the hidden paradise of strange and wonderful animals, fascinating plants and breathtaking landscapes, and examines how local communities have lived alongside these splendors of nature for centuries.

The Personal History of David Copperfield
HBO, 8pm

Veep writer-director Armando Iannucci hilariously reimagines Charles Dickens’ classic novel in this 2020 comedy. Dev Patel takes on the title role; as a grownup Copperfield, he’s determined to be the hero of his own life, which means telling his life story and revisiting his birth and troubled boyhood. A deep bench of supporting acting talent gives this whimsical tale even more depth, including Tilda Swinton as Aunt Betsey, Hugh Laurie as Mr. Dick and Ben Whishaw as Copperfield’s nemesis Uriah Heep. The result is cuter than the Dickens.

Sweet Carolina
Hallmark Channel, 9pm
Original Film!

Marketing executive Josie (Lacey Chabert) returns to her small North Carolina hometown when she becomes the unexpected guardian of her niece and nephew. While there, she reconnects with Cooper (Tyler Hynes), her high school boyfriend.

Iyanla: Fix My Life: “An Open Letter to All Black Men”
OWN, 9pm

A widowed father struggles to stop his two sons’ reckless behavior while grieving their mother’s death. Their actions threaten to send these young men straight down the prison pipeline, causing Iyanla to call in Dr. Steve Perry for reinforcements.

Ghost Nation: “Tortured Soul Asylum”
Travel Channel, 9pm
Season Finale!

Jason Hawes, Steve Gonsalves, Dave Tango and Shari DeBenedetti continue their investigation of Pennsylvania’s Harrisburg State Hospital. Hawes’ daughters, Satori and Samantha, join the team as they peel away the layers of the asylum’s sordid past to get to the root of the intense paranormal activity.

The Holzer Files: “Devil in the Rock”
Travel Channel, 10pm
Season Finale!

The team ventures to the Massachusetts coast to follow up on Hans Holzer’s 1964 investigation of the Bates Ship Chandlery. As they delve deep into the property’s past, they uncover a chilling undercurrent of darkness anchored in the rocky shores.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-short-history-of-living-longer/feed/ 0
‘The Masked Singer’ Final Five Compete in the Quarterfinals https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-masked-singer-final-five-compete-in-the-quarterfinals/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-masked-singer-final-five-compete-in-the-quarterfinals/#respond Thu, 20 May 2021 06:36:35 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/?p=561 © FOX 2021 ALSO SEE: 2021 NASCAR TV Schedules on FOX Sports & NBC Sports All Times Eastern. PBS programming varies regionally. Wednesday, May 12 The Masked Singer: “The Quarter Finals — Five Fan Favorites”FOX, 8pmThe remaining five performers take to the stage with the goal of reaching the semifinals in the new episode “The […]]]>


© FOX 2021

ALSO SEE: 2021 NASCAR TV Schedules on FOX Sports & NBC Sports

All Times Eastern. PBS programming varies regionally.

Wednesday, May 12

The Masked Singer: “The Quarter Finals — Five Fan Favorites”
FOX, 8pm

The remaining five performers take to the stage with the goal of reaching the semifinals in the new episode “The Quarter Finals — Five Fan Favorites.”

Clipped
discovery+
New Series!

This six-episode topiary competition series hosted by Michael Urie follows seven real-life “Edward Scissorhandses” who create breathtaking sculptures out of meticulously trimmed shrubbery, plants and flowers — designing colorful, larger-than-life, living works of art. Throughout the series, competitors will face high-stakes challenges and have their topiary masterpieces evaluated by lead judge and gardening icon Martha Stewart and an expert panel of judges, including critically acclaimed landscape architect Fernando Wong and lifestyle, landscape and horticultural expert Chris Lambton. Each week, they decide who makes the cut, who gets clipped and, in the end, who is crowned as the top topiarist who wins $50,000 cash.

Oxygen
Netflix
Original Film!

This French survival thriller tells the story of a young woman (Mélanie Laurent, Inglourious Basterds) who wakes up in a cryogenic pod and doesn’t remember who she is or how she ended up there. As she’s running out of oxygen, she must rebuild her memory to find a way out of her nightmare.

The Upshaws
Netflix
New Series!

In this comedy cocreated by Regina Hicks and executive producer/costar Wanda Sykes, Bennie Upshaw (Mike Epps, also an executive producer), the head of a Black working-class family in Indianapolis, is a charming, well-intentioned mechanic and lifelong mess just trying his best to step up and care for his family — wife Regina (Kim Fields), their two young daughters (Khali Daniya-Renee Spraggins, Journey Christine) and firstborn son (Jermelle Simon); and the teenage son (Diamond Lyons) he fathered with another woman (Gabrielle Dennis) — and tolerate his sardonic sister-in-law (Sykes), all without a blueprint for success.

Kids Say the Darndest Things: “Love Chat/Double Trouble”
CBS, 8pm
Guest Star Alert!

Tiffany Haddish and a wise 8-year-old dish out relationship advice on a special podcast, and Tiffany teams up with Cedric the Entertainer to cause double the trouble when they chat with identical twins in the new episode “Love Chat/Double Trouble.”

Married at First Sight: “Real Life Starts Now”
Lifetime, 8pm
Season Finale!

The journey for five couples who were married at first sight comes to a shocking and dramatic conclusion, as some choose to stay together, others choose to divorce and one refuses to decide.

Chicago Med: “A Red Pill, a Blue Pill”
NBC, 8pm

Third-year med students begin their rotation in the ED, and Maggie (Marlyne Barrett) keeps a careful eye on one of them. Meanwhile, Natalie (Torrey DeVitto) — whose mom’s health takes another decline — tries to cover up how she broke the rules to treat her.

TCM Spotlight: Order in the Court: “Courtroom Comedies”
TCM, beginning at 8pm
Catch a Classic!

May’s TCM Spotlight is back in session with another evening of films centered around courtroom themes. Tonight’s focus is on comedies set at least in part in the judicial system, and first on the docket is Adam’s Rib (1949), the classic romantic comedy starring Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn as married lawyers who find themselves opposing each other in court. Married couple and frequent screenwriting collaborators Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin received Oscar nominations for their screenplay. Next is Perfect Strangers (1950), a comedy/drama starring Ginger Rogers and Dennis Morgan as jurors who fall in love while sequestered during a murder trial; Ladies of the Jury (1932), a pre-Code comedy; George Stevens’ Cary Grant and Jean Arthur-led comedy/drama The Talk of the Town (1942), which received seven Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and two nods for its story and screenplay; and the comedy The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947), starring Grant, Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple. — Jeff Pfeiffer

Home Economics: “The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire: An Oral History (Used), $11”
ABC, 8:30pm

Connor invites the siblings to a party he’s throwing for his ex-wife, Emily. While he feels the need to prove that he is cool with their divorce, he is not the only one in the competitive spirit. Tom and Marina try to prove to each other that they still have game, while Sarah finds the perfect solution to the fact that she’s a bad gift-giver. Guest starring is Lidia Porto as Lupe and Justine Lupe as Emily.

The Conners: “Jeopardé, Sobrieté, and Infidelité”
ABC, 9pm

Darlene makes a decision about her trip to Hawaii, leading to a heated encounter with Barb. Meanwhile, Becky gives a presentation on addiction to Mark’s class. Guest starring is Candice Bergen as Barb, Katey Sagal as Louise, Estelle Parsons as Bev, Nat Faxon as Neville and Brian Austin Green as Jeff.

SEAL Team: “Hollow at the Core”
CBS, 9pm

Bravo Team is tasked with a covert mission to infiltrate a Boko Haram camp, hack its data network and rescue an American hostage in the new episode “Hollow at the Core.”

Nancy Drew: “The Celestial Visitor”
The CW, 9pm

The stage is set for a potential spinoff when Nancy (Kennedy McMann) helps billionaire inventor Tom Swift (Tian Richards) investigate a case of creepy proportions. “His bag of tricks — technology and gadgets, urban sophistication and enormous wealth and swagger — those don’t work against ghosts,” exec producer Noga Landau says with a laugh.

Bargain Block: “Safari and Country Estates”
HGTV, 9pm

A hoarder’s den and a house of mirrors have Keith Bynum and Evan Thomas shaking their heads, but they rise to the challenge with an animal-print motif and a quick design flip.

The Hills: New Beginnings
MTV, 9pm
Season Premiere!

After a year of lockdowns and lost time, the cast of Hollywood’s most iconic friend group is reuniting. This season finds them at a crossroads and their lives tested like never before. While some struggle with the financial strains from the global pandemic and rebuilding businesses, others are navigating through rocky relationships, struggling with addiction as well as their mental and physical health. From a highly publicized divorce and rekindling former flames to starting new families and surprise pregnancies, all bets are off this season.

Chicago Fire: “What Comes Next”
NBC, 9pm

A fire breaks out at a pet food factory, and Casey (Jesse Spencer) and Severide (Taylor Kinney) help the owner get to the bottom of it. Meanwhile, the annual garage sale takes place at 51, and everyone is on edge.

Call Your Mother: “The Raines Games”
ABC, 9:30pm

Jean fears her family is drifting apart so she brings everyone together for a game night that doesn’t go as planned. Guest starring is Sherri Shepherd as Sharon and Derrick Anthony King as Nick.

A Million Little Things: “Listen”
ABC, 10pm

In response to the killing of George Floyd, the group of friends are forced to reevaluate their own racial biases and take to the streets of Boston. Rome opts out in favor of his mental health and has a candid conversation with his father about how to effect change. Guest starring is Terry Chen as Alan, Adam Swain as Tyrell, Lou Beatty Jr. as Walter, Andrea Savage as Dr. Stacy and Karen Robinson as Florence Davis.

Food Paradise: “Noodle Nirvana”
Cooking Channel, 10pm

Now this is using your noodle: Some of the intriguing pasta-bilities you’ll see are spaghetti in a cone (New York City) and ramen noodles in a burrito (Venice Beach, California).

See No Evil: “Gold Pontiac”
Investigation Discovery, 10pm

When two women are gunned down outside their Tulsa apartment complex one morning in 2014, surveillance footage reveals a key clue: the killer lying in wait in a gold Pontiac.

Chicago P.D.: “Safe”
NBC, 10pm

After a series of brutal home invasion robberies, Upton (Tracy Spiridakos) immerses herself in the case and finds herself caught between Voight (Jason Beghe) and Halstead (Jesse Lee Soffer).

Thursday, May 13

The Rich and the Ruthless
BET+
Season Premiere!

This behind-the-scenes, dram-com soap that follows the fictional story of the family behind the first Black-owned daytime drama on broadcast television — who stop at nothing to stay in power — returns for its fourth season at its new home on BET’s streaming service, BET+ (the show’s first three seasons streamed on the Urban Movie Channel service, which has recently rebranded as ALLBLK).

Restaurant Recovery
discovery+
Season Finale!

The series in which restaurateur Todd Graves and his celebrity friends help save family-owned restaurants concludes its first season with this episode.

Castlevania
Netflix
Season Premiere/Series Finale!

In the epic fourth and final season of the animated series based on the computer game franchise, Wallachia collapses into chaos as factions clash — some attempting to take control, others attempting to bring Dracula back from the dead. Nobody is who they seem, and nobody can be trusted in these end times.

Young Sheldon: “The Wild and Woolly World of Nonlinear Dynamics”
CBS, 8pm
Season Finale!

Solving a challenging physics problem and annoying his professors is a typical day for 11-year-old East Texas Tech freshman Sheldon Cooper (Iain Armitage). But in the sitcom’s fourth-season ender, when twin sister Missy (Raegan Revord) experiences her first real heartbreak, here’s hoping the brainiac can pause the logical thinking and just lend a shoulder to cry on.

Walker: “Freedom”
The CW, 8pm

Walker (Jared Padalecki) and Geri (guest star Odette Annable) are both unsure of their feelings for each other after their kiss, and things get very complicated when Hoyt (guest star Matt Barr) comes home from prison. However, the welcome home party is interrupted when Micki (Lindsey Morgan) and Walker get word that Clint West (guest star Austin Nichols) is on the run.

No Demo Reno: “Dream House Redo”
HGTV, 8pm

Homeowners who still consider their house of 20 years to be their dream home feel it has become outdated and ask Jenn Todryk to give it a major facelift. Next, Jenn works with a couple who have always put their kids’ needs before their own to create the bedroom and bathroom suite of their dreams.

Manifest: “Bogey”
NBC, 8pm

Ben (Josh Dallas) reunites with a duplicitous foe; Mick (Melissa Roxburgh) and Zeke’s (Matt Long) dinner party with Jared (J.R. Ramirez) and his new girlfriend is halted by a calling that ignites the Stone siblings to save the life of one of their own; Olive’s (Luna Blaise) friendship with Levi (Will Peltz) blossoms but is tested.

Dream State: California in the Movies — Part I
TCM, beginning at 8pm
Catch a Classic!

Being the home state for Hollywood, it’s not surprising that California has found itself frequently used as a filming backdrop and/or story setting for scores of classic movies. With its “Dream State”-themed evenings, beginning tonight and concluding next Thursday, Turner Classic Movies airs a number of memorable films with a California setting. Tonight’s lineup begins by heading to the shore with Gidget (1959), starring Sandra Dee in the title role of the comedy that was one of the earliest teen “beach” films and introduced California’s surfing culture to a wide audience. Next, head inland a bit to Beverly Hills in Shampoo (1975), Hal Ashby’s Oscar-winning comedy/drama starring Warren Beatty as a successful but dissatisfied hairdresser to the stars. Then, in What Price Hollywood? (1932), the title city is the backdrop for a drama about an aspiring actress’ (Constance Bennett) experiences with various characters in the town. Hollywood is again the setting for the next film, The Big Picture (1989), a comedy starring Kevin Bacon as a Midwesterner who finds himself suddenly thrust into the Tinseltown world after winning a prestigious student film contest. Finally, the darker side of sunny Los Angeles and its surrounding area is the focus of one of the quintessential “California noir” films, The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946), starring Lana Turner and John Garfield. — Jeff Pfeiffer

United States of Al: “Car/Motar”
CBS, 8:30pm

In the new episode “Car/Motar,” when Riley (Parker Young) and Al (Adhir Kalyan) negotiate a deal for Al’s new car, they learn the hard way that they are not adept at finances and contracts.

Mom
CBS, 9pm
Series Finale!

The critically lauded comedy series that has explored the power of family, friendship and forgiveness to overcome addiction and personal strife signs off after eight seasons. Find out how things end up for Bonnie (Allison Janney), Jill (Jaime Pressly) and Marjorie (Mimi Kennedy), and see if Christy (Anna Faris) returns for a final appearance in the series finale episode “My Kinda People and the Big To-Do.”

Restaurant Impossible: “Saving an American Dream”
Food Network, 9pm

Robert Irvine faces the most difficult challenge of his career when he must save an immigrant’s American dream of holding on to her Las Vegas restaurant, Burnt Offerings. Robert must find unique ways to raise revenue and cut costs to keep the dream alive.

Last Man Standing: “Murder, She Wanted”
FOX, 9pm

Mandy (Molly McCook) gets jealous after Mike (Tim Allen) spends time with Ryan (Jordan Masterson) at a marketing retreat in the new episode “Murder, She Wanted.”

Flip or Flop: “Smelly Time Capsule”
HGTV, 9pm

Tarek El Moussa and Christina Haack make a costly decision to open up the floor plan on a stinky 1950s home in Whittier, California. The duo encounter extensive termite and water damage as they try to turn this disgusting and dated house into a modern money maker.

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: “Trick-Rolled at the Moulin”
NBC, 9pm

The SVU searches for three women suspected of drugging and robbing wealthy men, and the case leads to personal connections for both Benson (Mariska Hargitay) and Kat (Jamie Gray Hyder). Christopher Meloni guest-stars.

Paranormal Caught on Camera: “Kentucky Poltergeist and More”
Travel Channel, 9pm

A Kentucky woman hires an empath to rid her home of a pesky poltergeist; a terrifying creature holes up in a barn at night; and a Russian cosmonaut spots a UFO over Antarctica.

B Positive
CBS, 9:30pm
Season Finale!

Before their surgeries, Gina (Annaleigh Ashford) looks for a new apartment while Drew (Thomas Middleditch) celebrates his last day of dialysis in the Season 1 finale “Life Expectancy.”

Rebel: “Heart Burned”
ABC, 10pm

Rebel goes to great lengths to help save Helen’s life after she’s denied her surgery, and continues to push Cruz to negotiate the recall and study of the heart valve. Meanwhile, Cassidy and Lana try to help Luke when his personal life jeopardizes his career and reputation. Elsewhere, Cruz gets close to someone new. Guest starring is Mo McRae as Amir, Mary McDonnell as Helen, Adam Arkin as Mark Duncan, Abigail Spencer as Misha, Dan Bucatinsky as professor Jason Erickson and Sharon Lawrence as Angela.

Clarice: “Silence Is Purgatory”
CBS, 10pm

In the new episode “Silence Is Purgatory,” ViCAP links the River Murders to a pharmaceutical company, and Clarice (Rebecca Breeds) seeks help from Julia Lawson (guest star Jen Richards), the corporate accountant for the company, who refuses to work with the FBI.

Law & Order: Organized Crime: “An Inferior Product”
NBC, 10pm

Stabler (Christopher Meloni) faces the consequences of a failed drug bust; Bell (Danielle Moné Truitt) is forced to choose between the job and her family; and Gina (Charlotte Sullivan) gets an unexpected visitor. Mariska Hargitay and Demore Barnes guest-star.

Dark Side of Football
Vice, 10pm
New Series!

“I enjoy inflicting pain,” says ex-NFL star Tony Casillas in this football version of Vice’s blood-and-guts Dark Side docuseries formula, with tough guys such as Bill Romanowski weighing in on players’ off-camera violence.

Friday, May 14

The Underground Railroad
Amazon Prime Video
New Limited Series!

Oscar winner Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) is showrunner and executive producer, and directed all 10 episodes, of this limited series set in the antebellum South and based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Colson Whitehead. Newcomer Thuso Mbedu stars as Cora Randall, who makes a desperate bid for freedom after escaping a Georgia plantation. After hearing rumors about the Underground Railroad, Cora discovers that it is no mere metaphor, but an actual railroad full of engineers and conductors, and a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil.

High School Musical: The Musical: The Series
Disney+
Season Premiere!

In Season 2, the East High Wildcats, who are preparing to perform Beauty and the Beast as their spring musical, face off against rival school North High to win a prestigious and cutthroat student theater competition. Wigs are snatched, loyalties are tested and ballads are belted. The season also features brand-new solos written by Olivia Rodrigo and Joshua Bassett, and includes guest appearances from Derek Hough, Olivia Rose Keegan, Roman Banks, Andrew Barth Feldman and Asher Angel.

Ferry
Netflix
Original Film!

This film is a prequel to the Dutch-Flemish Netflix crime drama series Undercover. The story starts in 2006 in the city of Amsterdam, where Ferry Bouman (Frank Lammers, reprising his series role) works for drug lord Ralph Brink, a powerful criminal and Ferry’s mentor. After years of absence, a job for Brink finds Ferry returning to his beloved Brabant, which he had fled many years before. The difficult reunion with his estranged family, the return to the camper life he had forsaken and meeting his charming neighbor Danielle (Elise Schaap, also returning to her series role) all gradually crawl under Ferry’s skin.

Move to Heaven
Netflix
New Series!

This inspiring Korean drama follows Geu-ru (Tang Jun-sang), a young man with Asperger’s syndrome, and Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon), who suddenly finds himself as Geu-ru’s guardian. The two work as “trauma cleaners,” a group of people clearing out the last possessions of the deceased and uncovering stories that are left behind. Geu-ru and Sang-gu join hands to help the final move of those who have passed away, and deliver their messages to loved ones.

The Woman in the Window
Netflix
Original Film!

In this suspenseful psychological thriller based on the bestselling novel adapted by Tracy Letts, shocking secrets are revealed and nothing and no one is what they seem. Anna Fox (Amy Adams) is an agoraphobic child psychologist who finds herself keeping tabs on the picture-perfect family across the street through the windows of her New York City brownstone. Letts, Gary Oldman, Anthony Mackie, Fred Hechinger, Wyatt Russell, Brian Tyree Henry, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Julianne Moore also star.

Night Gallery: “Certain Shadows on the Wall”
Comet, 12:15pm

This creepy 1970 segment of Rod Serling’s horror anthology may have wormed its way into your brain as The One Where Agnes Moorehead Dies in Her Sickbed but Then Her Shadow Appears on the Parlor Wall and Won’t Go Away.

Shark Tank
ABC, 8pm

A pair of entrepreneurs from Industry, California, pitch their innovative system which helps create a custom pillow based on your unique sleep profile. Two entrepreneurs from Ipswitch, Massachusetts, believe they’ve hit a hole-in-one with their natural and fun alternative to a traditional sport. Entrepreneurs from Plymouth, Michigan, take outdoor dining to another level when they float their grilling product idea by the Sharks, while a husband-and-wife duo from Boise, Idaho, stretch the boundaries of what it means to wear functional shoes with ease. The Sharks in this episode are Mark Cuban, Kevin O’Leary, Lori Greiner, Robert Herjavec and guest Shark Daniel Lubetzky.

The Goonies
AMC, 8pm
Catch a Classic!

Richard Donner directed this fun Steven Spielberg production about a group of kids in Oregon desperately searching for a hidden pirate treasure to help save their homes from foreclosure. While The Goonies didn’t get anywhere near matching the other Spielberg-produced film of the summer of 1985, Back to the Future, at the box office, it still did well and remains a cult favorite among those who were a certain age when they first saw it in the theater. Its young main cast of heroes features names that have remained familiar as they went on to grownup acting roles, including Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Corey Feldman and Martha Plimpton. — Jeff Pfeiffer

Chopped: “Teen Redeem”
Cooking Channel, 8pm

Four teen chefs return to the kitchen with victory and redemption on their minds. The teens get creative with crab, use a novel ingredient, and must hustle to make sweet creations from cookies and peanut butter toast.

Pride
FX, 8pm
New Miniseries!

This six-part documentary series chronicles the struggle for LGBTQ+ civil rights in America decade-by-decade beginning with the 1950s. The first three episodes air back-to-back tonight, with the remaining three episodes airing Friday, May 21.

My Lottery Dream Home: “King and Queen of M’Orlando”
HGTV, 8pm

David Bromstad gets to stay at home to help Lee and Lacherrica find their dream home in Orlando, Florida. Lacherrica scratched up the best one-year wedding anniversary ever, when she hit the top prize of $1 million. It means they can finally leave apartment living behind, and buy their first home, and they’re aiming big. They want four bedrooms and three bathrooms!

Mommy’s Deadly Con Artist
LMN, 8pm
Original Film!

After Denise (Jackée Harry) loses her husband, she is determined to find who did it, which leads her to tracking down Stephanie and her “mother.” But things are not as they appear when a wealthy family stands to lose everything at the hands of this mother and daughter tandem. Also stars Dey Young, Chelsea Gilson, Rib Hillis, Andrew Phillip Rodgers and Sophia Katarina.

The Blacklist: “Ivan Stepanov”
NBC, 8pm

Red (James Spader) tries desperately to rescue an old friend at all costs, while Liz (Megan Boone) and Townsend (Reg Rogers) conduct an interrogation.

Happily Whatever: “Family Ties or Unleashed Adventure”
HGTV, 8:30pm

A recently married couple is eager to purchase their first home and plant roots. Having the freedom to live anywhere, the couple is torn between staying near family and friends in their beloved hometown of Los Angeles or making a radical move to Colorado.

Blue Bloods
CBS, 9pm
Season Finale!

The last time the Reagans saw Detective Joe Hill (Will Hochman), he reneged on a promised visit to Sunday dinner. The newly discovered grandson of police commissioner Frank Reagan (Tom Selleck) returns front and center, though, in tonight’s intense two-hour Season 11 ender. The story opens as Joe’s uncle Danny (Donnie Wahlberg) tracks down a weapon used in multiple crimes. The trail leads to a pair of illegal gun dealers … one of them Joe, working undercover. Unbeknownst to the family, he’s been loaned out to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to infiltrate a crew that is buying and selling guns and drugs up and down the East Coast. (ER favorite Gloria Reuben, who played Selleck’s love interest in several of his Jesse Stone TV movies, guest-stars as the senior ATF agent overseeing Joe.)

We Are Family: Songs of Hope and Unity
PBS, 10pm

We’re even smiling at this American Pops Orchestra concert’s set list, with “You’ve Got a Friend” (sung by Broadway’s Laura Osnes) and “Feeling Good” (The Voice’s Rayshun LaMarr). Judith Light hosts.

Saturday, May 15

Popeye and Pink Panther’s Party
MeTV, 7am

Henry Mancini’s jazzy theme plays the Pink Panther onto MeTV’s Saturday morning classic toon lineup,
where the cool cat joins Popeye.

NTT IndyCar Series: GMR Grand Prix
NBC, 2:30pm Live

The NTT IndyCar Series is at Indianapolis Motor Speedway as drivers battle it out in the GMR Grand Prix on the Brickyard’s 14-turn road course.

Major League Baseball
FS1, beginning at 4pm Live

Saturday MLB action on FS1 features the Oakland A’s at the Minnesota Twins, followed by the St. Louis Cardinals at the San Diego Padres.

Horse Racing: 146th Preakness Stakes
NBC, 5pm Live

The Kentucky Derby winner will try to keep its Triple Crown hopes alive today at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore for the running of the 146th Preakness Stakes.

NBA Basketball: Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony
ESPN, 5:30pm

There will be nary a dry eye as Los Angeles Lakers shooting guard Kobe Bryant is posthumously inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, along with other NBA greats Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett, Eddie Sutton and Rudy Tomjanovich.

The Manchurian Candidate
TCM, 5:45pm
Catch a Classic!

Eerie, shocking, daring, thrilling and mesmerizing, John Frankenheimer’s 1962 blend of Cold War paranoia and sly satire is one of the finest political thrillers ever made. Patrician Korean War vet Raymond Shaw (Laurence Harvey) returns to his politically placed family a Medal of Honor winner for his combat bravery. Now, however, his former commanding officer, Ben Marco (Frank Sinatra), is plagued by strange dreams of their time in Red Chinese custody. As Marco searches for the answer to what really happened to them there, he discovers threads of a diabolical plot orchestrated by the utterly ruthless Mrs. Iselin — portrayed in a Best Supporting Actress-nominated performance by Angela Lansbury; if you only know the actress as kindly Jessica Fletcher or a singing teapot, prepare to have your breath taken away by her commandingly villainous presence here. The sinister plan involves Iselin’s son, Shaw; her senator husband (James Gregory); and a secret cabal of enemy leaders. Janet Leigh and Henry Silva costar in the film, which also received an Oscar nomination for its editing. — Jeff Pfeiffer

China: Nature’s Ancient Kingdom
BBC America, 8pm
New Series!

This three-part nature series explores China’s national park project that has 10 sites dedicated to protecting the country’s rarest species and delicate ecosystems. The series unveils the hidden paradise of strange and wonderful animals, fascinating plants and breathtaking landscapes, and examines how local communities have lived alongside these splendors of nature for centuries.

The Personal History of David Copperfield
HBO, 8pm

Veep writer-director Armando Iannucci hilariously reimagines Charles Dickens’ classic novel in this 2020 comedy. Dev Patel takes on the title role; as a grownup Copperfield, he’s determined to be the hero of his own life, which means telling his life story and revisiting his birth and troubled boyhood. A deep bench of supporting acting talent gives this whimsical tale even more depth, including Tilda Swinton as Aunt Betsey, Hugh Laurie as Mr. Dick and Ben Whishaw as Copperfield’s nemesis Uriah Heep. The result is cuter than the Dickens.

Sweet Carolina
Hallmark Channel, 9pm
Original Film!

Marketing executive Josie (Lacey Chabert) returns to her small North Carolina hometown when she becomes the unexpected guardian of her niece and nephew. While there, she reconnects with Cooper (Tyler Hynes), her high school boyfriend.

Iyanla: Fix My Life: “An Open Letter to All Black Men”
OWN, 9pm

A widowed father struggles to stop his two sons’ reckless behavior while grieving their mother’s death. Their actions threaten to send these young men straight down the prison pipeline, causing Iyanla to call in Dr. Steve Perry for reinforcements.

Ghost Nation: “Tortured Soul Asylum”
Travel Channel, 9pm
Season Finale!

Jason Hawes, Steve Gonsalves, Dave Tango and Shari DeBenedetti continue their investigation of Pennsylvania’s Harrisburg State Hospital. Hawes’ daughters, Satori and Samantha, join the team as they peel away the layers of the asylum’s sordid past to get to the root of the intense paranormal activity.

The Holzer Files: “Devil in the Rock”
Travel Channel, 10pm
Season Finale!

The team ventures to the Massachusetts coast to follow up on Hans Holzer’s 1964 investigation of the Bates Ship Chandlery. As they delve deep into the property’s past, they uncover a chilling undercurrent of darkness anchored in the rocky shores.



Source link

]]>
https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-masked-singer-final-five-compete-in-the-quarterfinals/feed/ 0