Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:08:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Historic Ashtabula House Played a Key Role in the Underground Railroad https://chattahoocheetrace.com/historic-ashtabula-house-played-a-key-role-in-the-underground-railroad/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:08:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/historic-ashtabula-house-played-a-key-role-in-the-underground-railroad/ ASHTABULA, Ohio — During a dark chapter in American history, northeast Ohio became a beacon for slaves fleeing the antebellum South. Churches, homes and businesses in the area were among the last stops along the Underground Railroad. “I’m not sure the community realizes what we have here in Ashtabula County, as far as the Underground […]]]>

ASHTABULA, Ohio — During a dark chapter in American history, northeast Ohio became a beacon for slaves fleeing the antebellum South. Churches, homes and businesses in the area were among the last stops along the Underground Railroad.

“I’m not sure the community realizes what we have here in Ashtabula County, as far as the Underground Railroad is concerned,” said Patrick Colucci, superintendent of Buckeye local schools.

Ashtabula is home to the Hubbard House. The brick building, located above Lake Erie on Walnut Boulevard, was a stopping point for hundreds of people seeking freedom.

“We’re talking about the humanity of man to man, kindness, doing the right things for the right reasons,” said Richard Dana, adjunct professor at Kent State Ashtabula campus and former board chairman of administration of the Hubbard House Museum.

Abolitionists William and Katharine Hubbard built their farm in the early 1940s. They used the house’s location to help transport formerly enslaved people across Lake Erie and into Canada.

“They come away impressed as they look back in time and then come out looking forward to it,” Sally Bradley said.

“The Hubbards had a riverside warehouse where they took freedom seekers, and a boat could come in and plausibly take them to Canada,” explained Andy Pochatko, docent at the museum and reference librarian at the adjacent museum. . Harbour-Topky Library.

Although no records keep track of every person through the Hubbard household, some historians estimate that the family housed at least 400 fugitives.

“There are so many lessons that we have learned from history that are important. We must cling to these lessons. One of those lessons was here. It was how to be fair to people,” said museum guide Jim Spencer.

By 1979, the historic house had fallen into disrepair and had to be demolished. A small group of activists, including Hubbard descendant Tim Hubbard, campaigned for his rescue. The city of Ashtabula received the property and restored it to its former 1840s glory.

“The curators have taken great care of it to make sure it stays in the city of Ashtabula and tells the story of the city,” said Jim Timonere, City Manager of Ashtabula.

He added that the museum has been good for the local economy, as an attraction for locals and out-of-town visitors. Nearly 700 people passed through the museum during the 2022 visiting season.

“It really helped to have cool places like this that people were looking to get into, just spend a day with us,” Timonere said. “It’s really helped the local economy to have people here.”

Local educators have also found value in the museum and the lessons it provides.

“When you have something so precious here for your community, for your students, you have to maintain it,” Superintendent Colucci said.

Hubbard House executive director Sally Bradley added: “That’s another thing – reading in books than seeing something with your own eyes.”

Museum guides point out that the Hubbard House is just one important piece of the area’s abolitionist history.

“These stories will change their lives and their way of thinking,” said Frank Robsel, docent and member of the Hubbard House Museum board.

The museum is open Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day by reservation. Out of season, visits are possible by appointment.

The Hubbard House relies on the support of the community. You can make a donation, become a member or schedule a visit by by clicking on this link.

Staff are also planning the 43rd annual Hubbard House Underground Railroad Pilgrimage on October 8, 2022. This year’s theme will focus on the complex anti-slavery beliefs within Ashtabula County families. Those wishing to attend the free pilgrimage can gather at the Hubbard House, located at 1603 Walnut Blvd, beginning at 10 a.m. Call the museum at (440) 964-8168 with any questions.

In addition, on November 5, they will feature a membership campaign and a volunteer appreciation day.

Watch here for an in-depth story News 5 did about NEO’s role in the Underground Railroad.

Why They Called Cleveland ‘Station Hope’

RELATED: Why They Called Cleveland ‘Station Hope’

Download the News 5 Cleveland app now for more stories from us, as well as top news alerts, the latest weather forecasts, traffic updates and more. Download now on your Apple device here, and your Android device here.

You can also watch News 5 Cleveland on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, YouTube TV, DIRECTV NOW, Hulu Live and more. We are also on Amazon-Alexa devices. Learn more about our streaming options here.

]]>
The Taj Mahal arrives in Truro https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-taj-mahal-arrives-in-truro/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 23:09:40 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-taj-mahal-arrives-in-truro/ In May, Taj Mahal turned 80 – and everyone knows the blues only get better with age. Taj Mahal has helped define and develop American blues music for more than half a century. (Photo courtesy of Taj Mahal) One of the last of a generation from America’s golden age of blues music, Mahal is revered […]]]>

In May, Taj Mahal turned 80 – and everyone knows the blues only get better with age.

Taj Mahal has helped define and develop American blues music for more than half a century. (Photo courtesy of Taj Mahal)

One of the last of a generation from America’s golden age of blues music, Mahal is revered not only as a master performer, but also as a scholar of black music, brimming with anecdotes about the history of the music he plays. The Taj Mahal Trio will perform on Sunday September 18 at the Payomet Performing Arts Center in North Truro.

So where does this name come from? “A seed of my new name was planted by my parents,” he says in his 2001 Autobiography of a Bluesman. “They told me I could do anything I wanted in this life, instead of saying, ‘You’re black and it’s going to be hard on you. You’ll never make it.'” (His original name was Henry St. Claire Fredericks Jr.)

In this same book, his brother Richard Fredericks adds to the story: He says that when Henry first went to the University of Massachusetts at Amherst for his freshman year, he came back to Springfield for a visit and proclaimed that his new name was Henry, with a French accent. A month later he came back home and said his name was Taj Mahal. You could say it was a case of a freshman identity crisis if it weren’t for the fact that blues musicians have a long tradition of taking on new names for themselves, from Blind Lemon Jefferson to Scrapper Blackwell.

Born to a Harlem father of Caribbean ancestry and a South Carolina mother, Mahal spent much of his youth in Springfield, where he attended West Springfield High School and later Westfield High to study linguist. professional farming. In his autobiography, he argues that western Massachusetts and Boston had a strong Southern blues culture because runaway slaves made the abolitionist country their home in the antebellum era.

After his father died when Mahal was 12, he started working on tobacco and dairy farms. He had already started playing the guitar and would sometimes disappear for hours to play in the fields, where his brother Winston would find him and sit to listen.

In the early 1960s, Mahal left college and began playing in Boston, Cambridge and New York, where he was influenced by the music of Mississippi John Hurt and Elizabeth Cotten. He moved to Los Angeles, where he joined a cultural scene of musicians who mixed traditional American music with rock and rhythm and blues.

His 1968 self-titled album included covers of several traditional songs (including Blind Willie McTell’s “Statesboro Blues”, originally recorded in 1928) that were electrified with the energy of a new era. Mahal continued to innovate and develop his music over the following decades, frequently revisiting traditional styles from his youth while exploring Caribbean and other black diaspora music – as well as Hawaiian music, with his Hula Blues Band. .

The result is a lifetime of musical innovation and profound artistry that audiences will have a rare opportunity to experience for themselves in North Truro this weekend.

Only getting better and better

The event: The Taj Mahal Trio in concert
Time: Sunday, Sept. 18, 3 p.m.
The place: Payomet Performing Arts Center, 29 Old Dewline Road, Truro
The cost: $55 to $85 at tickets.payomet.org

]]>
Historic Lakeport Plantation survives 163 years https://chattahoocheetrace.com/historic-lakeport-plantation-survives-163-years/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 07:11:26 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/historic-lakeport-plantation-survives-163-years/ LAKE PORT PLANTATION – Arkansas’ most impressive pre-war house can now be visited in two different ways, depending on visitors’ preferences. This good news stems mainly from the precautions taken because of covid-19. When Lakeport Plantation opened to the public in 2007, it was mandatory to take a 1.5-hour guided tour. It was more time […]]]>

LAKE PORT PLANTATION – Arkansas’ most impressive pre-war house can now be visited in two different ways, depending on visitors’ preferences. This good news stems mainly from the precautions taken because of covid-19.

When Lakeport Plantation opened to the public in 2007, it was mandatory to take a 1.5-hour guided tour. It was more time than some travelers wanted to spend in this secluded location overlooking the cotton fields of Chicot County – and perhaps more historical details than they wanted to hear.

Pandemic concerns about escorting multiple nearby visitors have led to the self-guided option, which also costs less than being shown. Guests traveling alone can go at their own pace, spending as much time as they want in the 17-bedroom house while getting plenty of facts from the many information boards. Guided tours are always offered, starting on the hour during opening hours.

Lakeport was completed in 1859 at the dawn of the Civil War. It is now owned and operated by Arkansas State University, which carried out the extensive restoration work. Along with architectural history, a tour tackles the disparate lives of white plantation owners and their mostly black workers, who were slaves until the end of the war and mostly sharecroppers thereafter.

“Lakeport’s range of prospects goes beyond what we typically think of when it comes to a plantation home,” says Ruth O’Loughlin, site manager for the property. “Oral histories and our research tell a larger story, from early white settlements in the region to slavery and emancipation.”

Lakeport was established in 1831 near the Mississippi River by Joel Johnson, who arrived from Kentucky with his family and 23 slaves. When Johnson died in 1846, he owned 3,700 acres of fertile land and 95 slaves.

A 19th century grand piano can be seen in Lakeport. (Special for the Democrat-Gazette/Marcia Schnedler) Lycurgus Johnson, the eldest of his six sons, inherited most of the estate. His finances boomed in the late 1850s when he began building the 8,000 square foot house. By the time the work was completed, his property included 4,400 acres and 155 slaves.

“Visitors in recent years have shown more interest in slave life,” O’Loughlin said. “There are a lot of misconceptions about them. Unfortunately, what we know of their daily lives in Lakeport is very limited. Slaves were considered property, so their stories weren’t recorded. They weren’t given usually just a first name. And they were mostly illiterate.”

O’Loughlin and his colleagues continue their efforts “to improve our information about slaves. When the exhibits were installed, we worked to include as much as possible of what we knew at the time. We have oral histories of sharecroppers and of descendants of slaves.”

A list of slaves owned by Lakeport in 1858 is displayed in one room. Of the 192 people listed, only seven have a surname. Two are “Big Charlotte Binks” and “Big George Wright”. There is a “George Washington”. In a biblical vein, “Moses” appears three times. Two presumably elderly slaves are referred to as “Old Sally” and “Old Tom”. Two youths are identified only as “Delilah’s child”.

The arrival of Union troops in 1864 was a disaster for plantation owners in Chicot County. Federal soldiers confiscated Lakeport’s mules, horses, and cattle. Emancipation cost Johnson the loss of slaves worth $100,000.

But Lakeport continued. As the Encyclopedia of Arkansas reports, “While many of his neighbors sank into economic ruin and despair, Johnson survived and even prospered. He was able to negotiate the services of many freedmen who had been his slaves. And he quickly developed a reputation as a fair and honest employer.”

Photographs from the late 19th century show several former Lakeport slaves. A color photo taken in 2007 shows a speaker at the dedication ceremony of the plantation’s former Black Cemetery, which searches had located.

Photo The Lakeport owners’ children received dolls and other toys. (Special for the Democrat-Gazette/Marcia Schnedler) Prior to the Civil War, dozens of plantation homes stood in the Arkansas Delta lowlands. Almost all of them, O’Loughlin says, “have been lost to fire, neglect, natural disasters, and even the changing course of the Mississippi River.”

But not Lakeport. After Lycurgus Johnson’s death in 1876, the plantation remained in the family until his son Victor sold it in 1927 to Sam Epstein, an immigrant from Russia.

His descendants, who donated the house to Arkansas State University in 2001, still operate Epstein Land Co. The company owns 13,000 acres of land and a large cotton ginning operation around the house, listed in 1974 on the National Register of Historic Places.

Lakeport comes with a scattering of original items and a larger number of replicas. On guided tours, O’Loughlin points out high-end 19th-century artifacts like a square grand piano, silver ice tongs, and a pair of opera glasses.

She says “the most common questions we get on tours are about the doors. They are nearly 11 feet tall, a rarity. The scale of the doors and windows was partly to show the Johnsons’ wealth. They require higher ceilings, which helps combat the summer heat.”

Another common question gets a disappointing answer: “People often ask if the house is haunted. We don’t believe it.”

Lakeport Plantation

  • Address: 601 Arkansas 142, Lake Village
  • Hours: Open for self-guided tours from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. Guided tours start from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday to Friday.
  • Admission: Guided tours are $10 ($5 for K-12, seniors, and military). Self-guided tours cost $5.
  • Information: lakeport.astate.edu; (870) 265-6031
]]>
Carpenter to stay at CVB with combined role https://chattahoocheetrace.com/carpenter-to-stay-at-cvb-with-combined-role/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 22:25:42 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/carpenter-to-stay-at-cvb-with-combined-role/ Nancy Carpenter is staying at the Columbus-Lowndes Convention and Visitors Bureau for at least a year. Carpenter announced via press release Thursday afternoon that she had signed a one-year contract with the board. Going forward, she will oversee the operations of CVB and its affiliated nonprofit, the Columbus Cultural Heritage Foundation, in a combined role […]]]>

Nancy Carpenter is staying at the Columbus-Lowndes Convention and Visitors Bureau for at least a year.

Carpenter announced via press release Thursday afternoon that she had signed a one-year contract with the board. Going forward, she will oversee the operations of CVB and its affiliated nonprofit, the Columbus Cultural Heritage Foundation, in a combined role as CEO.

Carpenter previously held separate positions as executive director of the two organizations, each with separate salaries. In a lengthy executive session at an Aug. 15 meeting, the CVB board — which doubles as the CCHF board — voted not to renew his position on the CCHF.

“What has been done is a contract between the board and (Carpenter) to serve as CEO of CVB with various duties, which roughly matches the duties she had in the previous contract (CVB)” , explained the board of directors of the CVB. Attorney John Brady. “She will serve as CEO at CVB, and she will, without additional compensation, serve as coordinator and advisor to the CCHF Board of Directors.”

Carpenter previously received a combined salary of $121,785, including $102,556 for managing CVB and the balance for managing CCHF. She will now receive $110,556 in her new role as CEO, Brady said.

“Previously, she was a full-time employee of CVB…and had a separate contract with the Foundation on a part-time basis,” Brady said. “Now there is only one contract.”

These two contracts lasted three years. The new combined contract has a duration of one year.

Brady said negotiations have been ongoing with Carpenter over his contract since that August meeting.

“The contract was presented to him after the last meeting, and there were discussions between me as CVB’s lawyer and (Carpenter) about the terms,” ​​he said. “The board allowed me to have these conversations with her and present the contract to her, and it has now been signed by her and President Liz Terry.”

The board will have to formally approve the contract by Oct. 1, he said.

Liz Terry

“We are thrilled that Nancy will continue her dual role,” Terry said in the press release. “She did a wonderful job and we are happy for Columbus and Lowndes County.”

“It’s a great time in Columbus, Mississippi,” Carpenter said in the press release. “Visit Columbus and the Visitor Center teams are excellent, and we look forward to continuing their work together.”

Carpenter declined to comment further on Thursday afternoon, telling The Dispatch via text that she was flying to Washington, D.C.

Carpenter took over at CVB and CCHF in 2011. His contracts with both organizations were last renewed in 2019.

The CCHF is a non-profit organization affiliated with the CVB that oversees the Tennessee Williams Home, among other responsibilities. He also played a key role in the annual spring pilgrimage to the city’s pre-war homes.

In 2019, the Preservation Society of Columbus, made up of historic owners, informed the CVB that they wanted to take over the touring portion of the houses of the Spring Pilgrimage. This year was the first time the CPS-led pilgrimage had taken place, after visits were canceled during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Carpenter’s contract had been discussed at several meetings over the summer. The subject was raised at the June 27 meeting of the CVB, but no action was taken. The dispatch reported at the time that the board was considering splitting the directorships of the CVB and CCHF, as well as reducing the terms to one year.

Contract talks resumed at a special meeting on July 13, but no action was taken.

Brian Jones is the local government reporter for Columbus and Lowndes County.

Quality and thorough journalism is essential to a healthy community. The Dispatch brings you the most comprehensive reporting and insightful commentary from the Golden Triangle, but we need your help to continue our efforts. Please consider subscribing to our website for only $2.30 per week to help support local journalism and our community.

]]>
Annapolis art historian takes over as curator at Hammond-Harwood House – Capital Gazette https://chattahoocheetrace.com/annapolis-art-historian-takes-over-as-curator-at-hammond-harwood-house-capital-gazette/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 09:07:21 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/annapolis-art-historian-takes-over-as-curator-at-hammond-harwood-house-capital-gazette/ It was a big job, with a lot of drama. This is how Barbara Goyette describes the task Frances “Fanny” Chase Loockerman, mother of 10, undertook in 1811 when she moved into Hammond-Harwood House, a lavish estate on Maryland Avenue in Annapolis. “It’s a very interesting family living here, and they had all these kids, […]]]>

It was a big job, with a lot of drama.

This is how Barbara Goyette describes the task Frances “Fanny” Chase Loockerman, mother of 10, undertook in 1811 when she moved into Hammond-Harwood House, a lavish estate on Maryland Avenue in Annapolis.

“It’s a very interesting family living here, and they had all these kids, but it was a big economic job, trying to keep it going,” said Goyette, who became executive director of Hammond-Harwood House in 2016. .

The house was a gift from Fanny’s father, respected landowner, judge and Continental Congressman Jeremiah Townley Chase, who lived around the corner from King George Street.

Although he was generous, Chase also worried that Richard “Dickey” Loockerman, the St. John’s College student his daughter had fallen in love with, was in trouble.

“He was a bit unstable,” Goyette said. “The parents judged that he was not 100%,” Goyette said. Chase lent his son-in-law money on several occasions, eventually canceling those loans and forcing Loockerman to sell East Coast property to settle his debts. A surviving letter from a family friend indicates that Loockerman’s death in 1834 occurred after he traveled to Caroline County, “took to frolic while intoxicated” and was “fallen ill”.

“The guy didn’t have a lot of resources and he was always in debt,” Goyette said. “There were a lot of tragedies.

Two centuries later, maintaining Hammond-Harwood House remains a formidable task, and Goyette has a new partner to try to keep operations drama-free. Lucinda Dukes Edinberg, who recently served as acting director of the Mitchell Gallery, the museum on St. John’s College campus, begins work on Tuesday as the new curator of Hammond-Harwood House.

“We did a nationwide search,” Goyette said, “the best candidate was four blocks away.”

For Edinberg, the new job combines a trio of activities she has carried out in Annapolis for two decades: teaching art at Anne Arundel Community College, curating exhibitions and safeguarding a collection of decorative art – including Francis’s office. Scott Key – in St. John’s and frequently visit Hammond-Harwood House as a tourist.

She first came as a tourist in 1978 and, after moving to Annapolis, said the house was a must-see.

“Whenever I had friends in town, we always came here,” Edinberg said.

Since the early 2000s, Edinberg has held art history lessons around the Hammond-Harwood collection of decorative arts, including furniture by 18th-century Annapolis craftsman John Shaw and portraits of the first American petty officer Charles Willson Peale and his Swedish American tutor, John Hesselius. Students in his world architecture classes learned about the house’s carved wooden cornices, applications of principles like the Euclidean middle ground, and architect William Buckland’s obsession with symmetry. The dining room includes both a false door and a door disguised as a window.

“I revisited as an educator, and now I’m here as an educator,” Edinberg said. “The accent has changed a bit.”

Rachel Lovett, former curator of Hammond-Harwood House, announced earlier this year that she would return to her native New England to serve as executive director of several historic Cape Cod homes. The current special exhibition at Hammond-Harwood, which features more than two dozen portraits of Peale, was a joint effort: Lovett arranged loans from other collections and hung the paintings; Edinberg arranged the lighting (with only two outlets in the living room) and wrote an essay for the catalog.

Goyette and Edinberg also have a history of working together, as the two women overlapped in St. John’s, where Goyette previously served as vice president. His retirement from college, Goyette said, “lasted about three weeks.” She came to Hammond-Harwood as a consultant and eventually agreed to take on the position of executive director.

Now the two women are planning several major performance and infrastructure changes. Like many antebellum historic sites, Hammond-Harwood House seeks to elevate the lives of the slaves who once lived there. Records are sparse, Goyette said, but they recently learned from newspapers that Dickey Loockerman auctioned off a boy named Harry on the front porch to pay back taxes. He also “hired” a woman named Juliette to try to settle debts.

Many pre-Civil War diaries, such as Pulitizer Prize-winning Mary Chestnut’s account, reveal that women resented their husbands for mistreating slaves. Was this the case for Fanny Loockerman? Goyette doesn’t know, but the two incidents would certainly have been traumatic for the slaves and the lives of the Loockerman family, she said.

The corner of Maryland Avenue and King George Street may have been a dysfunctional crossroads, but Goyette and Edinberg believe the Loockerman children had happy times. The house has a small collection of what Edinberg calls “precursors of American dolls” and pint-sized furniture. The second upstairs bedroom currently houses the four-poster bed where unmarried sisters Lucy and Hester Hammond died in the 1920s. For the seven Loockerman children who survived infancy, it was likely a nursery . This is how they plan to reinterpret the play.

“One of the most common questions we get is, ‘Where did the seven children sleep? “said Goyette.

After Fanny and Dickey’s granddaughters died, the house was sold to St. John’s, but the college was unable to maintain the mansion during the Great Depression. In 1937, a group of women from the Baltimore Garden Club raised $42,000 to buy the house and, using auction records, successfully bought back much of the furniture from the Loockerman family. Since then, the house has been in the hands of a small non-profit organization.

Eleven large Georgian houses were built during Annapolis’ building boom of the 1760s and early 1770s, including the William Paca House, the James Brice House, and two houses owned by the Carroll family. Mathias Hammond, the bachelor barrister who commissioned the house in 1774, may have aimed for Georgian greatness, but historical records show he never lived in the house full-time. According to an unconfirmed historical account, Hammond was so obsessed with building plans that his fiancée broke off their engagement, and Hammond chose to live at his country home in Gambrills instead of Annapolis. He rented to several tenants, and Chase rented part of the house as a law firm for several years before buying the house for his daughter.

Afternoon update

Afternoon update

Days of the week

Update you on the biggest news of the day before the evening ride.

What sets Hammond-Harwood House today, Edinberg said, is the choice to interpret the colonial mansion as an 1820s home that tells a “social story” of Annapolis.

“It’s really about getting that vignette of what a workhouse was like, and not just something symbolic that’s on the sidewalk,” Edinberg said. “That’s why I consider it part of my job to bring this house to life and make it more than just a genealogy.”

In addition to tours, the house’s special programming includes a John Shaw furniture class taught in partnership with Smithsonian Associates. Soprano Elissa Edwards is artist-in-residence and programs chamber music in the garden and upstairs ballroom. And of course, Jane Austen’s fortnightly tour remains “hugely popular,” Goyette said.

Edinberg would like to add a Regencycore millinery workshop, allowing visitors to make hats suitable for a Bridgerton Ball. (She can be seen walking around Annapolis wearing a blue straw flowered bonnet.) Other ideas include sewing lessons, oyster shell plaster demonstrations, and children’s programs to teach children how to burn the Peggy Stuart, Maryland’s equivalent of the Boston Tea Party.

“There’s such great programming now, it’s easy to build on what’s being done,” Edinberg said.

But first for the new curator: orientation. Like all the other tour guides who are new to Hammond-Harwood this fall, Edinberg needs to revamp the history of the house.

“Docent training is next week,” Goyette told his colleague. “I have already registered you. »

]]>
Where to Go for Fall or Fall in the USA https://chattahoocheetrace.com/where-to-go-for-fall-or-fall-in-the-usa/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/where-to-go-for-fall-or-fall-in-the-usa/ But while New England has mastered its relationship with the season, this northeastern segment of the country isn’t the only option if you want to crack for fall. Far from there. The scale of the United States is such that autumn will take much of the next three months to traverse it – not finally […]]]>

But while New England has mastered its relationship with the season, this northeastern segment of the country isn’t the only option if you want to crack for fall. Far from there. The scale of the United States is such that autumn will take much of the next three months to traverse it – not finally ending its journey until mid-November, in the southern states widely praised for their subtropical temperatures and their heat almost all year round.

Along the way, he’ll bestow his Midas touch on regions just as scenically alluring as New England, but much less valued for their fall endeavors – wider parts of the Northeast better known for their big cities; the epic waterways of the Great Lakes, arcing, silvery and serene, towards the border with Canada.

And it will be there too, across the landmass, on a west coast that sometimes seems to exist in eternal summer, but bows to the rolling leaves just as romantically as the villages of Massachusetts or Maine. In other words, if you want to admire the fall, you have plenty of time and place to do so.

This feature offers 20 escape options in what, thanks to the pandemic and its various restrictions, will be the first American fall available to overseas travelers since 2019 – and, perhaps, all the more beautiful for the three-year interlude.

New England (key months: September, October)

Massachusetts

Much of New England’s image as the spiritual home of American fall is pinned to a single image – a narrow country road, surrounded by trees with delicate bronze foliage. The spiritual home of this unique image, one might say, is the Berkshires, a region of low hills and small towns – idylls with evocative names such as Great Barrington and Cheshire – which rise at the western edge of Massachusetts. . It’s a place you can explore at your leisure, on a winding road trip. Or you could be more active…

How to do: Macs Adventure (0141 530 5452; macsadventure.com) offers a seven-day hike in the Berkshires that traces an upper portion of the Appalachian Trail to the summit of Mount Greylock, Massachusetts’ highest peak. From £1,525 pp plus flights.

]]>
National Park Service funds restoration of windows at historic Brice House in Annapolis – Capital Gazette https://chattahoocheetrace.com/national-park-service-funds-restoration-of-windows-at-historic-brice-house-in-annapolis-capital-gazette/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 09:02:35 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/national-park-service-funds-restoration-of-windows-at-historic-brice-house-in-annapolis-capital-gazette/ Sometimes, when historic preservation experts need to rebuild a wall, a large grant helps them open 73 windows. Historic Annapolis, the nonprofit organization that operates several state-owned historic homes downtown, celebrates receiving a $500,000 grant from the National Park Service to help fund a 22-storey restoration project million dollars at Brice House. The money will […]]]>

Sometimes, when historic preservation experts need to rebuild a wall, a large grant helps them open 73 windows.

Historic Annapolis, the nonprofit organization that operates several state-owned historic homes downtown, celebrates receiving a $500,000 grant from the National Park Service to help fund a 22-storey restoration project million dollars at Brice House.

The money will be used to create reproductions of the original window frames, sashes and shutters of the colonial-era mansion, completed in 1774. Only two original sashes remain – interior frames that can be lifted and held up glass panels. With the grant, a carpenter with special skills will recreate frames so that eventually all 73 windows in the mansion will be historically accurate and functional.

“We have a lot on our plate,” said Michael K. Day, senior vice president of capital projects at Historic Annapolis, which manages the restoration. The state purchased Brice House in 2014 from the International Masonry Institute and allowed the nonprofit to begin restoring the house two years later. Initial projects included the reproduction of oyster shell mortar to repair the masonry and the peeling of two centuries of paint from the ballroom’s ornate plaster cornices.

“We had put window restoration on the back burner,” Day said.

Currently the window panes and frames are a mishmash, with a mix of original and replacement 1950s frame. Along the exterior of the East Street facade, some frames are painted white, d others in brick red. All need a little TLC. Historic Annapolis has yet to sign the paperwork, Day said, but if all goes according to plan, the federal grant should arrive in October, allowing a carpenter who has already built a prototype frame to return to work on the Windows.

The money comes at a crucial time for the Brice House project. Work is behind schedule and over budget, thanks to pandemic delays and unexpected masonry issues uncovered late last year, Day said.

Contractors spent most of last fall rebuilding the roof of the mansion’s west wing, known as the coachhouse. But when they put the roof back in place, the west wall suddenly started to crumble; the outer brick fell, the inner brick fell. It turns out that when the shed was converted from apartments to a corporate-style conference room four decades ago, the interior and exterior bricks were stacked next to each other rather than joined together. The entire wall – none of which was original – had to be replaced.

“The work they did 250 years ago was great. What they did in the 1980s and some 1990s was not,” Day said of the masonry at Brice House. The shed walls now need to be rebuilt and stabilized before work on the roof can resume.

“It wasn’t quite planned, and it kind of set us back a bit,” Day said.

The money for the Brice House project comes from a mix of private, state and federal funding. It was Kaelynn Bedsworth, development associate at Historic Annapolis, who discovered that the mansion would qualify for a new National Park Service initiative called the Semiquincentennial Grant Program honoring historic sites linked to the founding of the nation in 1776.

Afternoon update

Afternoon update

Days of the week

Update you on the biggest news of the day before the evening ride.

The guidelines required properties to be owned by both the state and the National Register of Historic Places.

“It was perfect for us,” Day said.

The Park Service has funded 17 projects in 12 states. Other sites receiving $500,000 grants include Old Fort Niagara, which was built by the French in western New York in 1729, and the Catoctin Furnace Historical Society in Thurmont, which will use its money to preserve the 18th century buildings and modernizing the museum’s HVAC system. of the Ironworker.

“National Parks and National Park Service programs serve to tell an authentic and comprehensive story, provide opportunities to explore the legacies that affect us today, and contribute to healing and understanding,” said the director of the NPS, Chuck Sams, in a press release announcing the grants. “Through the Semi-Quintennial Grant Program, we support projects that highlight the many places and stories that have helped shape the American experience.”

Although local planter, lawyer, and politician James Brice is less well known than other former residents of historic Annapolis homes, such as William Paca and Thomas Carroll, his home remains architecturally significant. The five-part Georgian mansion was one of the grandest and most elegant in Colonial Annapolis. Brice also happened to be a meticulous archivist. Work began on April 14, 1767, with the laying of a first stone marked “Le Commencement”. Thanks to its well-preserved records, the restoration team knows that construction took seven years, 326,000 bricks and 90,800 cypress shingles.

Once work on the west wing is complete, the team will focus on moving the HVAC mechanical equipment from the east wing to a new semi-subterranean outbuilding. This will allow interpreters to restore the kitchen and slave quarters of Brice House’s east wing and provide visitors with a stark reminder of how slaves lived and worked in antebellum Annapolis.

The money for this project comes from a state appropriation of $3 million, Day said. And I hope Maryland lawmakers provide the same level of funding for fiscal year 2024. The team restoring Brice House has a “to do list that never goes away,” Day said, but he thinks they are still on track to celebrate the half-quincentenary in 2026. .

]]>
Alabama’s Prettiest Small Town https://chattahoocheetrace.com/alabamas-prettiest-small-town/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 13:41:15 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/alabamas-prettiest-small-town/ There are many small towns located throughout Alabama. One in particular that belongs on everyone’s list is Eufaula. To learn all about this beautiful little town in Alabama, which offers something for everyone, take a look below. Eufaula, founded in 1834, is one of the most beautiful small towns in […]]]>




There are many small towns located throughout Alabama. One in particular that belongs on everyone’s list is Eufaula. To learn all about this beautiful little town in Alabama, which offers something for everyone, take a look below.

Have you ever visited the beautiful little town of Eufaula? If so, what did you think of it? Please share your thoughts with us in the comments below.

For more information on Lake Eufaula, be sure to check out the following article: The Breathtaking Alabama Lake That Will Make Your Summer Unforgettable.

Address: Eufaula, AL, USA

Address: Lakepoint State Park, 104 Old Hwy 165, Eufaula, AL 36027, USA

Address: The Shortest Mansion, 340 N Eufaula Ave, Eufaula, AL 36027, USA

Address: Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge, 343 AL-165, Eufaula, AL 36027, USA

]]>
Take a look at historic homes before the tour https://chattahoocheetrace.com/take-a-look-at-historic-homes-before-the-tour/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 12:00:40 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/take-a-look-at-historic-homes-before-the-tour/ Ready to go back in time ? Fort Collins homes rich in history and unique architectural style will be on display Sept. 17 as part of the Poudre Landmarks Foundations Annual Historic Home Tour. The tour will include seven stops, with regular favorites like the 1879 Avery House on Mountain Avenue and the city’s historic […]]]>

Ready to go back in time ?

Fort Collins homes rich in history and unique architectural style will be on display Sept. 17 as part of the Poudre Landmarks Foundations Annual Historic Home Tour.

The tour will include seven stops, with regular favorites like the 1879 Avery House on Mountain Avenue and the city’s historic 1883 Water Works building on the North Overland Trail. But this year will also mark a leap into the mid-20th century, with a handful of mid-century homes, a pair of 1950s and 1960s Airstream trailers, and a 1920 Southern mansion-turned-fraternity home that was saved in the 1970s and moved from College Avenue to a quiet Fort Collins subdivision.

Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 on the day of the visit. They are available for purchase at powderlandmarks.org or at the following locations: Ace Hardware of Fort Collins, 1001 E. Harmony Road; Downtown Ace Hardware, 215 S. College Ave.; The Closet, 152 S. College Ave.; Josephs’ Hardware and Home Center, 2160 W. Drake Road, or The Perennial Gardener and Sense of Place, 154 and 160 N. College Ave.

Here are some of the stops on this year’s tour.

The Shaw House, 1508 Buckeye Street.

The Shaw House was built in 1920 by barrister MH Shaw and his wife.  Throughout its life, the house served various families and a fraternity before being moved from 1325 S. College Ave.  at its current location in the Prospect Estates neighborhood.

Southern antebellum architecture meets a 1960s Fort Collins subdivision with The Shaw House – a stately two-story Classic Revival home with Doric columns in the Prospect Estates neighborhood. So why is this classic home tucked away on an unassuming housing estate street? Well, it hasn’t always been there. The 1920 home was originally built at 1325 S. College Ave. by lawyer MH Shaw, with its architecture serving as a nod to his wife’s Southern roots. After changing hands a few times, the house was finally sold to Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity in 1948 and served as the chapter house until the early 1970s. Although it was nearly demolished in 1974, the Local couple Harry and Evie McCabe stepped in to buy and move the house to its current location.

Source: Bill Whitley and the Landmarks Powder Foundation

The Johnston House, 1432 Meeker Drive

The Johnston House was built at 1432 Meeker Drive in 1964, representing the three-level house design made popular after World War II.

Billed as a “mid-century mashup”, this three-level house was built by Mr. and Mrs. Dick Johnston in 1964. But despite its mid-century construction date, the Powder Landmarks Foundation points out that three-level houses levels originated in the 1930s as architects looked to design more compact housing on smaller lots. After World War II, the tri-level took off in the United States, serving as the anchor house design in subdivisions across the country. While home to modern updates, the Johnston House still has some remnants of its original design, including its 1960s two-sided fireplace and geometric brick exterior patterns.

Source: Robin Stitzel and the Landmarks Powder Foundation

The Riffenburgh Residence, 1424 Meeker Drive

The Riffenburgh Residence, 1424 Meeker Drive, was built in 1963 for Riffenburgh Elementary School's namesake Waldo Riffenburgh and his wife.

The Johnston House isn’t the only mid-century offering on this year’s historic home tour. In fact, it’s not even the only featured house on Meeker Drive – there are actually four. The Riffenburgh Residence was designed and built at 1424 Meeker Drive for attorney Waldo Riffenburgh – the namesake of nearby Riffenburgh Elementary School – and his wife, Pearl, in 1963. After several modifications in the 1980s and 1990s , the current owners of the house have worked to bring it back to its mid-century roots.

Source: Jodie Chamberlain and the Landmarks Powder Foundation

Airstream Trailers

Pearl's 1961 Tradewind Airstream trailer will be on display for the 2022 Historic Homes Tour, showing off its original mid-century fittings.

A pair of Airstream trailers will also be on display as part of this year’s tour. Janell Prussman’s 1950 Flying Cloud Airstream and 1961 Tradewind Airstream serve as little mid-century time capsules. While the 1950 trailer has been refurbished and the 1961 one has also been updated, Prussman still has written records from the first owner of the 1961 trailer, including a typed journal of his cross-country travels.

]]>
Biden’s student loan plan isn’t enough for black Americans https://chattahoocheetrace.com/bidens-student-loan-plan-isnt-enough-for-black-americans/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 14:57:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/bidens-student-loan-plan-isnt-enough-for-black-americans/ I will not benefit from Biden’s plan to forgive up to $10,000 in student loan debt (or up to $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients) for people earning less than $125,000 a year. And while I can’t find the reasoning behind the income capping device, I do get the basic idea: those with higher incomes, like […]]]>

I will not benefit from Biden’s plan to forgive up to $10,000 in student loan debt (or up to $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients) for people earning less than $125,000 a year. And while I can’t find the reasoning behind the income capping device, I do get the basic idea: those with higher incomes, like me, can generally manage their loans more easily than those with higher incomes. weak. There’s some theoretical truth to that, but ultimately this “solution” is doubly disappointing: it’s not a big enough or bold enough reimagining of how we treat education in general, and it completely misses the mark for black Americans looking for a country that wants to be racial. Justice.

I don’t blame anyone for having their loans canceled under this new policy, even though I won’t get relief; However, I lament the administration’s failure to properly weigh the role wealth plays, or should play, in student loan forgiveness. I mean wealth as opposed to income–wealth that is, assets that can be passed down from generation to generation. Lots of people I went to law school with will benefit from this loan forgiveness and also come from families who own houses, land, boats, cars, stocks, etc. That is, they took out loans for higher education but also living with a buffer of generational financial security that eludes me and my family members. I don’t come from a wealthy family. When my (black) father passed away, he literally left nothing of financial value; a tiny life insurance policy covered the cost of his cremation. (I’ve written before about the impact of racism on her life.) When my mother dies, she won’t leave anything of financial value either; she is a social worker and was a single mother. There are no wills, no estates, no trusts, no legacies, no capital, nothing. Somehow I feel rude and uncomfortable considering “things of financial value” in the same sentence as death – but that’s how wealth works. A generation accumulates and the next generation inherits after the death of the elderly.

Here’s something else about how wealth works: it can’t accrue to people who aren’t allowed, whether by law, social norms, or economic realities, to accumulate it. If, as in the example of the black half of my family, things like redlining and the GI Bill, and even current home ratings reflect anti-black racism, then in all but the rarest of circumstances, black individuals and families literally cannot create wealth. Elders won’t reach the end of their lives with assets to pass on, and children won’t get a nest egg or windfall – let alone a silver spoon – to build on. The policies and norms that create this reality are intentional, not accidental, and they date, at least philosophically, from chattel slavery. For centuries, and driven by a false ideology of white supremacy, those who make up federal, state, and local governments have created and maintained powerful barriers to black wealth, while facilitating white wealth (see, for example, the GI Bill.). Like almost everything that has its roots in pre-war America, we haven’t solved the problem yet. Those of us who pay for our education with loans but have no family wealth are paying the price.

And black people, once again, carry an inordinate burden. In addition to earning disproportionately less money than their fellow white Americans, black Americans have one-sixth the wealth of white Americans on average, per capita. It is therefore not surprising that black families borrow at higher rates than their non-black counterparts and owe more. According to the Brookings Institute, “differences in interest accrual and borrowing from college lead black graduates to carry nearly $53,000 in student debt four years after graduation, or nearly two times more than their white counterparts. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that ten thousand dollars in relief will benefit white people more than black people. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand the impact of wealth on student loan debt, either: Wealthier people need to borrow less, and if they do, they do so with a cushion. They won’t fall through the cracks and are much less likely to be ravaged by the vagaries of the labor market and the economy in general.

Did the Biden administration seriously consider all of this as it mapped out its options? Did he consider, for example, that from the outset the federal student loan program disadvantaged blacks? In 1958, when the first federal student loans were offered, they went to promising high school students at the discretion of colleges; it was a time when high schools and colleges were bitterly separated, black schools were brutally and intentionally under-resourced, racism was worn as a badge of honor, and there was not even a language for the concept of prejudice unconscious in college admissions.

Has the administration seized this moment as a chance to finally locate a new and better North Star, one that meets the imperative to create racial equity despite and because of our racialized origins? It would seem that the answer to these questions is no. My disappointment, unfortunately, is familiar.

Let me be clear. I’m not saying only black people deserve loan forgiveness. On the contrary: I think student loans should be canceled, period, and we should recognize, through policy change, that the poor and middle class of all races have been cheated by the student loan industry. , which, as the wall street journal journalist Josh Mitchel says it, “privatize[s] profit and socialize[s] losses.” We should recognize that education, whether seen as an enhancement of the mind in itself or as an economic imperative, is a human right. But it is undeniable that black Americans will suffer disproportionately from the Biden’s mixed and lukewarm response to what must be understood not only as a financial crisis, but also as a racial crisis.

Indeed, the administration has let a moment of far-reaching racial justice slip through its fingers. Eliminate even a little After Student loan debt – not even all of it! – would have profound implications for racial justice. According to consumer rights group Public Citizen, canceling $50,000 in debt would immediately increase black wealth by 40%. It is important. The wealth gap has long and varied tentacles: In addition to making education more accessible and student debt more manageable, wealth enables families to deal with financial emergencies, start businesses, buy homes, to marry when they want, to have children if and when they want, to give philanthropically, to access legal justice, to exercise political influence and to dream about the future instead of worrying about it.

The policy unveiled today is simply too little. Too little imagination, too little common sense, too little understanding of the larger context. Too little for all of us, but especially for those of us who have no generational wealth, however modest, to fall back on.

It’s too little, but fortunately not too late. Biden should consider his new policy as a first draft. His administration should take the notes of progressive and race-conscious scholars, historians and activists to heart, and try again. Build back better, you might say. All borrowers would benefit from a broader sense of fairness here; and perhaps most importantly given our history, black borrowers could lay down some of the deeply unjust burdens of American racism. If Biden refuses to cancel student debt entirely, he has a moral duty to acknowledge the racial impact of his policy choice. If he doesn’t like that impact, then he should change the policy. That’s the American dream, isn’t it? We aim high, we don’t give up and we all cross the finish line better than when we started.

More Must-Try Stories from TIME


contact us at letters@time.com.

]]>