Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 12:02:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 The Mayberry Effect | News from Mount Airy https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-mayberry-effect-news-from-mount-airy/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-mayberry-effect-news-from-mount-airy/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 13:30:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-mayberry-effect-news-from-mount-airy/ September 22, 2021 T. Graham Brown has seen a lot and visited a multitude of different places during his 40 year musical career. The country music star has released 16 albums. Almost two dozen of his singles have made it – 11 in the Top Ten Billboard Hot Country Songs, three of which reached number […]]]>

T. Graham Brown has seen a lot and visited a multitude of different places during his 40 year musical career.

The country music star has released 16 albums. Almost two dozen of his singles have made it – 11 in the Top Ten Billboard Hot Country Songs, three of which reached number one.

Along the way, he lived the life of a musician, staying on the road, doing thousands of shows all over the United States and beyond.

Still, looking more like an artist leaving for his first tour, the country music star is almost giddy with anticipation for two of his upcoming appearances, both at this year’s Mayberry Days.

“I’m super excited to come, I really am,” the Nashville, Tennessee resident said recently. “I’m not saying that. I am really excited about this.

While he’s set to perform at the Mayberry Days Dinner Thursday night and the Historic Earle Theater on Friday, he has his own list of things to do in Mount Airy.

“I’m going to go to Snappy Lunch, have a pork chop sandwich, then I’m going to go to Floyd (barber shop), then I’m going to go to one of the stores to see if I can get an Andy (Taylor) clock.” .

He said he would also like the chance to meet Thelma Lou’s Betty Lynn.

“I would love to give her a hug, that would be awesome,” the singer said.

While Brown has had a very successful career as a singer, when he talks about his visit to Mount Airy this week he is much more interested in talking about the show and the people on the TV show.

For anyone who chats with Brown, it doesn’t take long to realize he’s a true fan, not someone who says that just because that’s what Mayberry Days fans want to hear.

His tour bus is called Bullet Maintenance – a name he and his staff gave to the vehicle in the 1980s, when its career was starting to take off.

“Because of the Barney bullet,” he said of the strange name. “In one episode, Barney was in the bank, and he was riding on Asa the guard, his gun was falling apart, so Barney was running on him. And then Barney took the bullet out of his pocket, lifted it up and said ‘Now, Asa, here’s the bullets talk.’ “

Brown said he grew up watching the show in its original version, but really became a huge fan during his college days, attending the University of Georgia. There he started watching reruns and fell in love with the series.

“We have our own chapter of the Andy Griffith Show Rerun Watcher’s Club on the (tour) bus.”

Although he never had the chance to meet Andy Griffith or Don Knotts, nor most of the cast, Brown said while performing at the Grand Old Opry that he had met Richard O. Linke, the manager. by Griffith. Linke was able to get some signed photos of Griffith for Brown.

The singer also has a Vote Fife For Sheriff poster by Don Knotts from the movie “Return to Mayberry”, courtesy of Jim Clark, one of the founders of the original Rerun Watcher’s Club.

He was a close friend of George Lindsey, who played Goober in the series.

“I got a lot of my Mayberry fix from it,” Brown said. “We were always talking about Mayberry. He had a lookout party at his house for Return to Mayberry… it was really fun.

Brown said he also has an orange and blue lettered jacket from the fictional Mayberry Union High – and just to show how deep his Mayberry trivia are, Brown embarks on an a cappella version of the high school song – without miss a word.

Brown grew up in Arabi, Georgia, in the south of the state. He describes Arabi as a small farming town with around 300 people living there.

“Both sides of my family are farmers, we’re a bit used to this way of life, I guess, that’s how I grew up.”

While those roots may have helped shape his eventual penchant for country music as an artist, he said that by singing – and occasionally writing songs – he draws inspiration from a wide variety of genres. .

“When I was little, I had a transistor radio and I listened to it at night. I could pick up stations from all over the United States on the AM dial… you could hear an R&B station from Nashville, a country station from Louisiana, a Top 40 in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

He counts R&B legend Otis Redding, country debuts Johnny Cash, George Jones and Loretta Lynn as influences on his music, and he has said he is a huge fan of many more famous stars.

“I remember listening to the Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the Monkees… Aretha Franklin, Percy Sledge, I love everything. Frank Sinatra, whom I really like, and Tony Bennett.

His own musical development wasn’t necessarily something he was looking to pursue – instead, it just seemed to come naturally.

“I was just playing the fool, mostly,” he recalls from his childhood. “I was singing in the house, I was singing in church. Mom said I sang all the time.”

This “blunder” eventually led to working as a musician, earning a living by regularly performing nightly shows at a Holiday Inn in Athens, Georgia.

He married his wife, Sheila, in 1980, and two years later they both moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where he found work singing publicity jingles for a multitude of local and national businesses. In 1985, he released two singles from his soon-to-be released debut album, “I Tell It Like It Used To Be”.

The first of the singles, Drowning in Memories, reached 39 on the US Billboard Country charts, and his second single, “I Tell It Like It Used To Be,” reached No. 7. The following year he released the album, which peaked at No.15 on the Albums chart, along with three other singles, two of which reached No.1 – and her career was set.

Now, nearly 40 years after moving to Nashville, he and his wife live just outside of town, with views of rolling countryside and distant ridge peaks from his front porch.

Except when the coronavirus pandemic cancels her shows, Brown is still singing, still on tour, and still trying to fill her list of things to do and people to meet Mayberry.

And he’s hoping to tick a few things off that list this week, when he’s at Mount Airy for Mayberry Days 2021.


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The best and worst thing about every state – 24/7 Wall St. https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-best-and-worst-thing-about-every-state-24-7-wall-st/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-best-and-worst-thing-about-every-state-24-7-wall-st/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 13:00:28 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-best-and-worst-thing-about-every-state-24-7-wall-st/ Special report September 23, 2021 9:00 a.m. The residents of every state have something to be proud of. Whether it’s good weather, a valuable natural resource, a famous event, or the fact that locals tend to be healthy or successful, every state has its advantages. However, each state also has unique drawbacks. Some states are […]]]>

Special report

The residents of every state have something to be proud of. Whether it’s good weather, a valuable natural resource, a famous event, or the fact that locals tend to be healthy or successful, every state has its advantages.

However, each state also has unique drawbacks. Some states are prone to natural disasters like hurricanes, blizzards, and forest fires. Others have systemic problems like underfunding of schools and pensions.

To determine the best and the worst thing about each state, 24/7 Tempo examined health and income data from the US Census Bureau as well as numerous other studies, reports, and events.

Although each state has positive and negative points, certain preferable attributes are more common in some states than in others. Many states rank among the healthiest, best educated, and safest places in the country. These states tend to have higher incomes and more employment opportunities. These are the states with the best and the worst economies.

Click here to see the best and the worst thing about each state


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Haitian Migrants Update: Deportations End with Border Patrol Whips: Report https://chattahoocheetrace.com/haitian-migrants-update-deportations-end-with-border-patrol-whips-report/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/haitian-migrants-update-deportations-end-with-border-patrol-whips-report/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 16:45:34 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/haitian-migrants-update-deportations-end-with-border-patrol-whips-report/ A boy bathes with a jug of water at a US-Mexico border migrant camp September 21, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. | Source: John Moore / Getty IIn an astonishing reversal, Haitian migrants who gathered in Texas in an attempt to seek asylum would no longer face deportations and would have been allowed to remain […]]]>

A boy bathes with a jug of water at a US-Mexico border migrant camp September 21, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. | Source: John Moore / Getty

IIn an astonishing reversal, Haitian migrants who gathered in Texas in an attempt to seek asylum would no longer face deportations and would have been allowed to remain in the United States after outrage escalated from the part of border patrol officers on horseback appearing to physically assault blacks attempting to cross into the country from Mexico.

The move by immigration officials came days after the Biden administration began mass deporting the migrants by sending them back to Haiti, where some of them said they had not been informed of their final destination. The abrupt about-face was apparently the result of widespread shame from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the border patrol, which had approached the humanitarian crisis with a zero-tolerance policy that turned violent.

While exact figures were not immediately available, the Associated Press reported – citing anonymous government officials – that a “very, very large scale” of Haitian migrants were “released”, although it not be clear what this declared freedom actually looks like in terms of where they will go.

“Many have been released with notices to appear at an immigration office within 60 days, a result that requires less processing time from border patrol officers than ordering an appearance in court in the United States. ‘immigration and indicates the speed at which authorities are moving, ”the Associated Press reported.

There was no mention of the possibility for migrants to apply for US citizenship, although they were reportedly “being processed under immigration laws”.

The US government’s 180 follow calls by black leaders for presidency Joe biden take decisive action for asylum seekers prompted by images of Border patrol officers on horseback use reins to whip Haitian migrants in scenes reminiscent of the pre-war south.

Activist Tamika mallory was among those voices who used plain language to call out the role of the federal government in contributing to the international humanitarian crisis on American soil.

Noting how Biden did not use his first United Nations speech as president on Tuesday morning to address the situation in Del Rio, Texas, Mallory suggested that all of the Democratic leadership as well as the president’s administration were at blame.

“They are responsible,” Mallory said of Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, using their names. “There is no one else.”

She later added that “there is no way around the fact that under this administration they are responsible.”

UNITED STATES-POLICY-IMMIGRATION-TEXAS

A mounted United States Border Patrol officer uses the reins to whip and try to prevent a Haitian migrant from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas, September 19, 2021. | Source: PAUL RATJE / Getty

For his part, DHS secretary Alejandro Mayorkas initially tried to downplay the situation at the border and suggested that there was nothing inhumane about the treatment of Haitian migrants. He said the border patrol did not use whips even though video footage showed them whipping the migrants.

After DHS began deporting them on Sunday, Mayorkas used the moment to try to dissuade other migrants from literally following in their footsteps.

“If you come to the United States illegally, you will be returned. Your trip will not be successful and you will endanger your life and that of your family, ”Mayorkas said on Monday. But as Mayorkas uttered the words, images and video footage went viral showing a border patrol violently attacking Haitian migrants in an attempt to round them up for deportation.

This led to the outcry which no doubt influenced Mayorkas to undermine his own words.

After learning about plans for the removal of migrants, Haiti asked the United States on Sunday for a “humanitarian moratorium” on the expulsions of around 14,000 people.

“The situation is very difficult,” said Jean Negot Bonheur Delva, who heads Haiti’s national migration office.

Admittedly, it was never a practical idea, let alone human, to deport people to a nation that is in the grip of multiple crises following the assassination of the Haitian president. Jovenel Moses and last month’s magnitude 7.2 earthquake that killed more than 2,100 people, injured more than 10,000 and left tens of thousands homeless.

At least one group of Haitian migrants expelled from Del Rio were not told they were returning to Haiti in a reported case of duplicity used against desperate people seeking a better life for themselves and their families.

People who were taken from Texas and disembarked in Port-au-Prince expressed a similar sentiment to human rights defenders and Haitian leaders who said it was not a good idea to send the migrants back to Haiti.

“How did they get us back here?” Johnson Bordes asked in an interview with the Post moments after stepping off the plane that landed in Haiti on Sunday. “It is an injustice. I don’t even know where we’re going to sleep tonight.

After Moïse’s assassination in July, Mayorkas told Haitians they should not go to the United States

Mayorkas said Haitians trying to get to the United States will “die” and would have discouraged any “migration by sea.” He later added: “Let me be clear, if you go to sea you will not come to the United States.”

The United States has already extended protections to Haitian nationals living in the 50 continental states under Temporary protection status (TPS). This status was renewed in May for an additional 18 months for a maximum of 55,000 Haitians. Haitians living in the United States under GST were previously facing evictions until Mayorkas renewed their protections.

SEE ALSO:

After gruesome photos surface, black leaders call on President Biden to take action on asylum seekers now

Photos of border patrol with horse whips chasing Haitian migrants conjure images of slavery

HAITI-LES CAYES-SEMÊME-PEAL DE DEATH

85 photos


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Holidays in the United States: a guide to river cruising … https://chattahoocheetrace.com/holidays-in-the-united-states-a-guide-to-river-cruising/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/holidays-in-the-united-states-a-guide-to-river-cruising/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 17:02:01 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/holidays-in-the-united-states-a-guide-to-river-cruising/ Credit: Shutterstock Travel to the United States reopens to Brits in November, so there has never been a better time to start planning a United States cruise vacation. Cruise vacations to the United States have given residents the green light for several months – but now the country will soon welcome British travelers as well. […]]]>

Credit: Shutterstock

Travel to the United States reopens to Brits in November, so there has never been a better time to start planning a United States cruise vacation.

Cruise vacations to the United States have given residents the green light for several months – but now the country will soon welcome British travelers as well.

While the Caribbean may seem like the obvious choice for a happy American, the nation offers much, much more, especially when it comes to river cruises.

America can offer wonderful river cruise experiences. Mississippi is almost synonymous with Mark Twain, who once said: “Travel is fatal to prejudice”.

Whether you choose to cruise along the Mississippi or Columbia rivers, you’ll discover educational, cultural, and musical memorabilia ranging from the Civil War and slavery to blues and jazz.

Here are three of the incredible rivers you will discover on a cruise and the adventure that lurks along their shores.

Lower Mississippi River Cruises

The French Quarter of New Orleans is the city’s oldest neighborhood and is home to a number of jazz haunts, including Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop, dating from the 1720s. Preservation Hall is another option, but you may need to. be in line. There is no bar or air conditioning, but there is a lot of authentic music.

This is plantation country and Oak Alley, with its magnificent quarter-mile canopy of 300-year-old holm oaks marking the path to a pre-war Greek Revival-style home is a case in point.

Another is Myrtles Plantation, considered one of the most haunted houses in America. Frogmore, a working cotton farm dating back to the 1800s, has the only computerized cotton gin in the country.

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The French Quarter of New Orleans is the city’s oldest neighborhood and is home to a number of jazz haunts. Credit: Shutterstock

Natchez and Vicksburg focus on the Civil War. The National Military Park is home to more than 1,300 monuments, monuments and battlefields.

Almost 40 years after his death, Elvis Presley continues to intrigue, and here is the opportunity to visit his home in Graceland and the Sun Studios in Memphis where the King has recorded so many hits. To make the most of the tour, opt for the audio-guided tour which features both the legend himself and his daughter Lisa Marie.

Another must-see is the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, set up in the former Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King was assassinated.

The exhibits trace five centuries of history – from the beginnings of resistance during slavery, through civil war and reconstruction, to the events of the late 20th century that inspired people around the world to defend the ‘equality.

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Memphis is where Elvis Presley was so successful. Credit: Shutterstock

Upper Mississippi Cruises

St Louis is famous for its 630-foot arch and the drive to the top – with its fantastic views stretching for 30 miles in all directions on a clear day – is a great way to see what lies ahead on a river cruise .

To wet your whistle, head to the Anheuser Busch Brewery and the stables built in 1885 to house the Clydesdale horses that were used to pull the wagons carrying beer. All this before getting on board and immersing yourself in the history of the river and the explorers, cowboys and Native Americans who helped forge the American nation.

In Hannibal, the obvious choice is the Mark Twain Boyhood Home and Museum where a visit to the Huckleberry Finn house and the renovated Becky Thatcher home.

Davenport is home to many music festivals, both jazz and blues; you might be lucky enough to arrive during one of them, but otherwise there is a lot to hear, see and do. From antique tractors to modern tractors at the John Deere Pavilion, tracing the agricultural history of the region, to the Hauberg Indian Museum which tells the story of the Sauk and Meskwaki Indians, there is something for everyone.

The National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium in Dubuque gives you the chance to pilot a barge, experience the devastation of a flood, and follow a 92-foot map of the river beneath your feet through simulators. It also traces the lives of the pioneers, explorers and artists who lived along the river.

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St Louis is famous for its 630 foot arch and the drive to the top. Credit: Shutterstock

Columbia River cruises

The names Lewis and Clark come out of the tongues of many Americans, and the Columbia River is the perfect place to learn all about them.

The couple were commissioned by Thomas Jefferson – one of the founding fathers and third president of the United States – to explore the region after the Louisiana Purchase whereby 828,000 square miles of territory was purchased from the French for a cost of only three cents an acre. .

After reaching the Pacific in 1805 and on the advice of the Clatsop Indians, Lewis and Clark established camp at Fort Clatsop where they wintered before returning east to St Louis in the spring.

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Mount St Helens, which last erupted in 1980 – with catastrophic consequences – is an awe-inspiring sight. Credit: Shutterstock

Besides its cultural history, the river is a place of natural wonder. The 80-mile canyon is filled with breathtaking scenery including mountain peaks, abundant wildlife, and waterfalls, including the 600-foot Multnomah Falls.

Hells Canyon is said to be the deepest and most remote in North America and it definitely is what it feels like. The 8,363-foot Mount St Helens that last erupted in 1980 – with catastrophic consequences – is an awe-inspiring sight.

There are over 30 wineries along the Gorge, with names like Scorched Earth Vineyards and Naked Winery. Try Naked’s Oh! Orgasmic if you get the chance.

Getting back to man’s efforts and for a bit of history combined with shopping, the Pendleton Woolen Mills are worth a visit. Founded by English weaver Thomas Kay, it is the only factory in the United States founded specifically to produce Indian trade blankets.


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History comes to life at the Exchange Place Fall Festival | Community https://chattahoocheetrace.com/history-comes-to-life-at-the-exchange-place-fall-festival-community/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/history-comes-to-life-at-the-exchange-place-fall-festival-community/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/history-comes-to-life-at-the-exchange-place-fall-festival-community/ After being canceled last year due to COVID-19, the Fall Folk Arts Festival returns to Exchange Place on Saturday and Sunday, with live demonstrations of 19th century crafts. Contributed photo Marshal Adesman | Exchange place Exchange Place Living History Farm will kick off the fall by hosting the 49th annual Fall Folk Arts Festival. Following […]]]>





After being canceled last year due to COVID-19, the Fall Folk Arts Festival returns to Exchange Place on Saturday and Sunday, with live demonstrations of 19th century crafts.


Contributed photo


Marshal Adesman | Exchange place

Exchange Place Living History Farm will kick off the fall by hosting the 49th annual Fall Folk Arts Festival. Following the cancellation of last year’s event due to COVID-19, this harvest season celebration will take place on Saturday, September 25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, September 26 from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is $ 5, and children under 12 are admitted free.

With major support from Hamlett-Dobson Funeral Homes, all proceeds will go towards the care of farm animals and the ongoing restoration and preservation of the site, located at 4812 Orebank Road in Kingsport, Tennessee. And this year, because the virus remains present in the region, all CDC protocols will be followed, including closing historic buildings. Visitors are strongly advised to wear masks and to maintain a safe distance from others.

Artists from across the region will come together to showcase 19th-century craftsmanship, as well as sell a wide range of traditional folk arts and craft arts of today. Plants for fall planting will also be available, along with dried flowers, seasonal crafts, local honey, goat’s milk cheeses, salsas and hot sauces, and ground cornmeal. on stone, oatmeal and more.

In addition, several renowned heritage artists will be on the ground during the weekend. Longtime Southern Highland Craft Guild member George McCollum will be making his very famous White Oak miniature baskets (Saturday only). Master Craftsman Heather Ashworth of the Arrowmont School of the Arts in Gatlinburg will be offering two traditional broom making workshops on Sunday at noon and again at 2:30 pm Students will tie two hand brooms using hand corn. broom and colorful rope. The cost for this one-time workshop is $ 65 and includes all materials. Registration is required by Sunday September 19 at heather4trees@gmail.com. (Please note that classes will only take place if at least five people register.)


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Lauren Groff’s “Matrix” Robert Jones Jr. Makes the Cut https://chattahoocheetrace.com/lauren-groffs-matrix-robert-jones-jr-makes-the-cut/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/lauren-groffs-matrix-robert-jones-jr-makes-the-cut/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:15:06 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/lauren-groffs-matrix-robert-jones-jr-makes-the-cut/ The National Book Foundation has announced the list of nominees for the 2021 National Book Awards. Among the nominees for fiction is Lauren Groff, whose book “The Matrix” received a critical ★★★★ (out of four) from USA TODAY. Critic Steph Cha called the historic book, about a prioress of an impoverished medieval abbey, “a relentless […]]]>

The National Book Foundation has announced the list of nominees for the 2021 National Book Awards.

Among the nominees for fiction is Lauren Groff, whose book “The Matrix” received a critical ★★★★ (out of four) from USA TODAY. Critic Steph Cha called the historic book, about a prioress of an impoverished medieval abbey, “a relentless display of Groff’s frightening talent.” Groff had previously been nominated for her 2015 novel “Fates and Furies”.

First-time novelist Robert Jones Jr. is also on the list for “The Prophets,” a historical novel about two gay men enslaved on a plantation in the prewar south.

Author Robert Jones Jr.

“’The Prophets’ is full of otherworldly and extremely artistic tales, and readers are sure to lose themselves in a radiant romance,” reads a ★★★★ review for USA TODAY. “But most importantly, Jones adds to the growing body of literature that reinvents slavery.

Previously nominated author Anthony Doerr, whose 2014 novel “All the Light We Can’t See” was on this year’s shortlist, returns with his new novel, “Cloud Cuckoo Land.”

On Thursday, the nominees for the non-fiction were announced. Among them is Ohio poet and essayist Hanif Abdurraqib, whose book “A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance” meditates on black artistic performance in the United States and how it is inextricably linked. woven into the fabric of American culture.

In a ★★★ (of four) review of the book for USA TODAY, Darryl Robertson writes: Columbus, Ohio, on the music and videos of Whitney Houston; conversations with elders at a local barbecue in Memphis; and Joséphine Baker working as a spy for the French army.

Following: Hanif Abdurraqib’s “A Little Devil in America” ​​Examines Acts of Joy in Black Performance

Author and poet Hanif Abdurraqib.

Author and poet Hanif Abdurraqib.

Clint Smith is also nominated for his book “How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America”. In a 1/2 (of four) review of the book for USA TODAY, Chris Vognar writes:, editor at The Atlantic, aims to show how what happened just over 150 years ago cannot be helped to cast a shadow over what’s going on now, especially not when, for the price of a bus ticket, you can be taken back to the crime scenes.

For the full list of nominees, including children’s literature, translated literature and poetry, visit nationalbook.org. The finalists for the five categories will be announced on October 5 and the winners will be announced on November 17. The National Book Foundation plans to host the winners’ event in person this year after making last year’s ceremony virtual due to the pandemic.

Last year’s winners were Charles Yu for fiction for his novel “Interior Chinatown”; Les Payne and Tamara Payne for their non-fiction book “The Dead are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X”; Kacen Callender for children’s literature with “The King and the Dragonflies”; Yu Miri for “Tokyo Ueno Station”, translated from Japanese by Morgan Giles, for translated literature; and by Don Mee Choi for poetry with “DMZ Colony”.

Author Clint Smith.

Author Clint Smith.

Longlist 2021 nominees for fiction

  • Anthony doerr, “Land of the cloudy cuckoo clock”

  • Lauren Groff, “Matrix”

  • Jakob Guanzon, “Abundance”

  • Laird hunt, “Zorrie”

  • Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, “The love songs of WEB Du Bois”

  • Robert Jones Jr., “The Prophets”

  • Katie Kitamura, “Privacy”

  • Elizabeth mccracken, “The Museum of Remembrance”

  • Jason mott, “The hell of a book”

  • Richard Powers, “Perplexity”

Longlist 2021 nominees for non-fiction

  • Hanif Abdurraqib, “A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance”

  • Lucas bessire, “Escape: in search of water on the high plains”

  • Grace M. Cho, “The taste of war: a memoir”

  • Scott Ellsworth, “The Ground Breaking: An American City and Its Quest for Justice”

  • Nicole eustache, “Covered With Night: A History of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America”

  • Heather McGhee, “The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Thrive Together”

  • Louis menand, “The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War”

  • Tiya miles, “Everything She Wore: The Trip of Ashley’s Bag, A Keepsake of the Black Family”

  • Clint smith, “How the Word Gathered: A Review of the History of Slavery Across America”

  • Deborah Willis, “The Black Soldier of the Civil War: A Visual History of Conflict and Citizenship”

Following: Colson Whitehead’s latest novel “Harlem Shuffle” among the 2021 Kirkus Prize nominees

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Lauren Groff, Richard Powers nominated for the National Book Award


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A bold Catholic investment in downtown education https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-bold-catholic-investment-in-downtown-education/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-bold-catholic-investment-in-downtown-education/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 12:55:56 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/a-bold-catholic-investment-in-downtown-education/ Mother Mary Lange is the founder of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, based in Baltimore. (CR file) Chances are, “Mother Mary Lange” is not a household name in most American Catholic circles. This unfortunate state of affairs may change, however, thanks to a courageous initiative now underway in Baltimore, one of America’s most troubled cities. […]]]>
Mother Mary Lange is the founder of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, based in Baltimore. (CR file)

Chances are, “Mother Mary Lange” is not a household name in most American Catholic circles. This unfortunate state of affairs may change, however, thanks to a courageous initiative now underway in Baltimore, one of America’s most troubled cities.

Who was the Servant of God Mother Mary Lange, OSP?

A few years after her birth on the island of Hispaniola, the child baptized Elizabeth Clarisse Lange was taken by her parents to Santiago de Cuba, as the family fled the chaos of the Haitian Revolution of 1791. Emigrated to the United States In their infancy, Elizabeth appears to have lived in Charleston and Norfolk before settling in Baltimore, which had a sizable Free African-American population, the number of which was augmented by refugees from French-speaking Haiti. After opening a school for black children in her home in Fells Point near Baltimore Harbor, Elizabeth, guided by a French Sulpician priest, Father James Joubert, discerned a vocation to consecrated life: she would help found a religious community for women of African descent, dedicated to the education of African Americans.

Archbishop James Whitfield approved and on July 2, 1829 Elizabeth Clarisse Lange made her first vows and, along with three other “free women of color” (as they were called at the time), created the Oblate Sisters of Providence. Taking the religious name of “Sister Mary,” Lange became the first superior of the community and led the new order, founding schools for girls, homes for widows and orphans, and vocational training centers for women. Risking their lives and the future of their community during a cholera epidemic in 1832, four of the sisters, including Mother Lange, treated victims of the plague. Mother Mary Lange then served her community as a longtime novice mistress and, presumably, a role model, before her death in 1882.

Over a century later, in response to long-standing local reverence for this remarkable woman, the Archdiocese of Baltimore initiated a formal study of the heroic virtues of Mother Mary Lange, and the cause for her beatification was opened to Rome in 2004. It is a success, and indeed, the subsequent canonization of Mother Lange would be very welcome. Meanwhile, her example is embodied in the first Catholic school opened in the city of Baltimore in 60 years, as Mother Mary Lange Catholic School welcomed its first 400 students in late August.

The Archdiocese has raised over $ 25 million to launch this cutting-edge facility for some of the city’s most disadvantaged youth. Partnerships with local universities, businesses, nonprofits, and social service agencies will enhance the school’s academic excellence with extended care, summer and enrichment programs. Unlike too many modern downtown schools, which are more like bunkers or prisons, Mother Mary Lange School was designed to be open to the troubled neighborhoods of West Baltimore, better known as the location of many urban depredations described in Thread. As Alisha Jordan, the principal of the new school, said, “When you walk into this building there are so many rooms and windows from which you can see the community. I think that’s it [Mother Lange] would have liked. This is true, I think, because Mother Lange would also have applauded the fact that 80-90% of the students at the school, who come from 70 postcodes and are 80% non-Catholic, will receive generous help towards the costs of schooling – and religious education.

When the bishops of the United States mandated a nationwide Catholic school system at the Third Plenary Council in Baltimore in 1884, they probably didn’t realize they were endorsing the most successful anti-poverty program in the world. Catholic history in the United States – and arguably American history. . Today, inner city Catholic schools are a lifeline for children whose futures are even more threatened by the failure of state schools and stubborn teachers’ unions who resist education reform while engaging in various forms of ideological indoctrination. This lifeline is threatened by financial pressures on many dioceses, and while vigorous efforts are underway across the country to save Catholic schools in the city center, the pandemic has made the predicament even more difficult.

It takes vision, courage, and faith to launch a multi-million dollar adventure in high-level Catholic education in urban settings in these circumstances: the kind of vision, courage, and faith that led a poor black immigrant to found a new religious school. commission for African-American women in the prewar south; the kind of vision, courage and faith that has now led to the opening of the aptly named Mother Mary Lange Catholic School in Baltimore, my beloved, albeit in a hurry, hometown.

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The annual Sunset Heights Home Tour is scheduled for October https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-annual-sunset-heights-home-tour-is-scheduled-for-october/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-annual-sunset-heights-home-tour-is-scheduled-for-october/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 02:37:42 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/the-annual-sunset-heights-home-tour-is-scheduled-for-october/ The Sunset Heights neighborhood is one of the most beautiful and historic in El Paso. The West Quarter is so accessible on foot and everywhere you look there is amazing architecture in the houses that make up the area. Every year for nearly two decades, some of the homes in the area have been open […]]]>

The Sunset Heights neighborhood is one of the most beautiful and historic in El Paso. The West Quarter is so accessible on foot and everywhere you look there is amazing architecture in the houses that make up the area. Every year for nearly two decades, some of the homes in the area have been open to the public for the Sunset Heights Tour of Homes. This year’s tour will take place on Saturday October 2 from noon to 4 p.m.

You will need to purchase tickets for the tour. You will not be admitted to any of the houses without a prepaid ticket. Tickets will not be available at individual homes and tickets will be checked at the doors of each home. Proceeds from the visit are donated to the Sunset Heights Neighborhood Improvement Association. The Association helps residents maintain their historic properties so that we can continue to enjoy the area.

Tickets cost $ 10 for adults, $ 5 for children 10 and under. You can either pre-purchase the tickets, which I suggest as this is a very busy event, or purchase them the same day at the Hal Marcus Gallery at 1308 N. Oregon. You can also purchase them at Burges House, home of the El Paso Historical Society, at 603 W. Yandell.

You can get more information by calling the Hal Marcus Gallery at (915) 533-9090, or the El Paso County Historical Society (915) 533-3603. Check out the neighborhood details on the Sunset Heights Neighborhood Improvement Association Facebook page.

1. 603 W. Yandell – The Burges House – for the ticket day: 12 p.m.

2.1013 W. Yandell Dr. – Trost House / McGregor Home

Assoc. of Sunset Heights neighborhood.

3.525 Corto Way – Résidence Kohlberg / Fischer Home

Assoc. of Sunset Heights neighborhood.

4.600 Prospect Street – Torres House

Assoc. of Sunset Heights neighborhood.

5. 510 N. Santa Fe St. – Sunset Heights exhibit El Paso History Museum from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Assoc. of Sunset Heights neighborhood.

6. 1308 N. Oregon St. – Galerie Hal Marcus – for ticket day: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Assoc. of Sunset Heights neighborhood.

The Sunset Heights neighborhood, one of the state’s first planned neighborhoods. Some of the homes on this year’s tour date back to the early 1900s. They are true treasures in our city and the money raised on the tour will help those who own them maintain the historic integrity of the neighborhood.

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Bridgton’s Rufus Porter Museum begins expansion plan https://chattahoocheetrace.com/bridgtons-rufus-porter-museum-begins-expansion-plan/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/bridgtons-rufus-porter-museum-begins-expansion-plan/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 17:59:16 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/bridgtons-rufus-porter-museum-begins-expansion-plan/ Bridgton’s Rufus Porter Museum of Art and Ingenuity is in the early stages of adding a third building to display 22 murals and serve as a community gathering space. Kristen McNerney / Lake District Weekly As Bridgton’s Rufus Porter Museum of Art and Ingenuity wraps up its season next month, Executive Director Karla Leandri Rider […]]]>

Bridgton’s Rufus Porter Museum of Art and Ingenuity is in the early stages of adding a third building to display 22 murals and serve as a community gathering space. Kristen McNerney / Lake District Weekly

As Bridgton’s Rufus Porter Museum of Art and Ingenuity wraps up its season next month, Executive Director Karla Leandri Rider will be busy planning next summer’s expansion.

Plans call for a third building to be added to the museum site at the intersection of Main and Church streets. The museum hopes to inaugurate the new building next summer, which will house 19th-century murals attributed to Porter’s nephew, Jonathan Poor. The murals are from the home of 19th-century Boston physician James Norton, said Leandri Rider.

The two existing museum buildings feature miniature portraits, murals and 19th-century inventions by Porter, as well as a gift shop and an exhibition currently on display on women’s suffrage as it relates to art and innovation. .

Rufus Porter, approx. 1872, photographic print by an unidentified photographer. To file

“We are very fortunate to have these two historic homes,” said Leandri Rider of the adjoining buildings – one of which was transported from North High Street in 2016. “That being said, we don’t have much to do with it. ‘space.”

The new building will also provide community space, she said, much like what’s planned for Nathaniel Hawthorne’s renovated home in Raymond.

“It is well known in Bridgton that there is very little public space,” said Leandri Rider. “We want to have something that the audience can come in and do their own thing. “

The timing of the addition will depend on private fundraising, with everything to be determined by construction costs, Leandri Rider said. The building must also be approved by the Maine Historic Preservation Commission.

The 16-year-old museum offers a glimpse into the life of Porter, a self-taught 19th-century muralist and folk art inventor who lived in Bridgton as a child. Porter is known for creating Scientific American magazine, New England-themed landscapes, and a number of inventions, including the spinning rifle, an idea sold to Samuel Colt for $ 100.

“Porter was instrumental in the modernization of American society in the pre-war era through his strenuous efforts in various fields,” independent museum curator Laura Sprague said ahead of a 2020 Bowdoin College exhibit on Porter.

While struggling with space issues, especially during the pandemic when social distancing is encouraged, engagement in the museum has remained.

Porter invented and marketed this plumb-and-level indicator in the mid-1840s. Luc Demers

This summer, the museum oversaw more programs with children, said Leandri Rider. On the lawn, children were taught how to make invisible ink, which Rufus Porter wrote in his 1820s publication “Curious Arts,” which taught readers how to reproduce anything he discovered.

“Nothing he ever did was secret,” she said of Porter, who wanted to share his artistic and scientific inclinations with the world of his time.

The museum aims to carry on Porter’s legacy, said Leandri Rider, while instilling creativity in contemporary minds.

This was the fourth year that the museum had sponsored a scholarship for Camp Invention, a week-long program for children at Stevens Brook Elementary School.

“Rufus Porter would like no one to be left out of this process,” said Leandri Rider of universal access to the arts and sciences.

Porter was also a nature lover, seen in his Portland landscapes, she said. Connections to nature were made by the museum this year in a Secret Gardens Tour, where attendees were given a map of a number of the city’s private gardens that they could visit by car. Usually the program is a ‘house of mysterious history tour’, but the museum has had to move away from indoor activities in light of the pandemic.

Before the end of the season, residents of the Lake District can take advantage of Smithsonian Magazine’s annual Museum Day this Saturday, September 18, during which a number of arts and cultural institutions are offering free admission. The Rufus Porter Museum participates and is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Usually the museum charges $ 8 for admission.

For more information on the museum and Rufus Porter’s legacy, visit the museum’s website.

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Old South vs. New America: What Confederate Monuments Say About Us https://chattahoocheetrace.com/old-south-vs-new-america-what-confederate-monuments-say-about-us/ https://chattahoocheetrace.com/old-south-vs-new-america-what-confederate-monuments-say-about-us/#respond Sun, 12 Sep 2021 16:30:07 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/old-south-vs-new-america-what-confederate-monuments-say-about-us/ The 20e anniversary of September 11 challenges us to consider what our country stands for, what it should represent, and for whom it should represent. The central idea of ​​Confederate monuments is that the pre-war south is still present. It remains – and will always remain – anchored in the fabric of American consciousness. The […]]]>

The 20e anniversary of September 11 challenges us to consider what our country stands for, what it should represent, and for whom it should represent.

The central idea of ​​Confederate monuments is that the pre-war south is still present. It remains – and will always remain – anchored in the fabric of American consciousness.

The problem, of course, is that one cannot separate – historically, sociologically or emotionally – respect for the Old South to torture human beings. To buy them and sell them. To separate children from parents and wives from husbands. To capture them. For murdering them.

That’s not to say that other Americans don’t support slavery, or even don’t own slaves. But to my knowledge, there are no Confederate monuments honoring the Vermont secessionists. Confederate monuments were dedicated to promoting a Southern supremacist heritage, aimed at intimidating and threatening those who stood in the way. And not only “standing”, but also “standing”, because they continue to offend and dishonor those whose ancestors died so that these confederates can live forever in public places.

The removal last week of a Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond, Va. Met with the usual backlash. Former president Donald trumpDonald Trump Biden opposes Newsom on eve of recall: “Nation’s eyes are on California” On The Money: House Democrats cut tax hikes Biden Abortion providers warn the “chaos” if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v Wade MORE – who according to the Republican National Committee “still leads” the GOP – was quick to name Lee a national hero while lamenting – wrongly – that “with the exception of Gettysburg, [he] would have won the [Civil] War. ”Trump also strangely insisted that Lee would have postponed America’s“ total victory ”in Afghanistan.

Hyperbole and questionable intent aside, the idolatry of Lee and those he led in the fight against the United States raises questions his perennial supporters will not – or be able to – answer: How many centuries are enough? to honor the men who killed hundreds of thousands of Americans? And by extension, for what purpose do we obey monumental decisions made generations ago?

At the end of the 19e and early 20e centuries – the years when many of these monuments were erected – doctors have generally recommended soothing teething babies with licorice-flavored morphine syrup. Why don’t American medical textbooks continue to promote morphine syrup? Because of scientific progress. The previous “experts” who pushed this product into homes do not deserve public recognition. They don’t deserve pedestals. In other words, we should have known better at the time. We did not do it. Now we are doing it. And the medical writings and the attitudes of parents have evolved accordingly.

And the notion of “evolution” is critical. We can remember the mistakes of the past without bringing them to the face of people. Likewise, can we also remember the horrors of the past without venerating the perpetrators.

Slavery was the original sin of our country. Showing monuments to those who killed and died to perpetuate slavery is a contemporary sin. A majority of Americans agree and want the monuments to disappear. The other side inexplicably believes their removal will somehow desecrate America.

By guarding these Confederate monuments, we are taking orders from avowed fanatics of the past, who were desperate to revive the lost cause. Over 1,000 remaining statues represent the triumph of these fanatics over modern America, which is supposedly (but far from) “post-racial.”

Each day these structures dominate us, we, a supposedly evolved nation yearning for goodness and greatness, striving to break free from a history steeped in dehumanization, unconditionally surrender to a deeply racist philosophy.

If we really are a better country than we were 50, 100, and 150 years ago, then it’s high time we grew up and acted like this.

BJ Rudell is a longtime political strategist, former associate director of the Center for Politics at Duke University, and recent member of the North Carolina Democratic Party. In a career spanning stays on Capitol Hill, presidential campaigns, in a newsroom, in classrooms and for a consultancy firm, he has authored three books and has shared political ideas on all of them. media platforms, including for CNN and Fox News.


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