Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 18:11:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Antebellum Homes – Chattahoochee Trace http://chattahoocheetrace.com/ 32 32 Studying slavery | UDaily https://chattahoocheetrace.com/studying-slavery-udaily/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 18:11:30 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/studying-slavery-udaily/ This 1849 map of New Castle County, Delaware, showing the wider area near Newark, is from the original surveys of Samuel Rea and Jacob Price and is one of the first county wall maps produced in the United States. Students in the “Race and Inequality in Delaware” class used it and other maps extensively as […]]]>
This 1849 map of New Castle County, Delaware, showing the wider area near Newark, is from the original surveys of Samuel Rea and Jacob Price and is one of the first county wall maps produced in the United States.  Students in the “Race and Inequality in Delaware” class used it and other maps extensively as primary sources.

This 1849 map of New Castle County, Delaware, showing the wider area near Newark, is from the original surveys of Samuel Rea and Jacob Price and is one of the first county wall maps produced in the United States. Students in the “Race and Inequality in Delaware” class used it and other maps extensively as primary sources.

Photos by Evan Krape and courtesy of UD Special Collections and University Archives and Stanford University

Students present research conducted on the history of Delaware College

As students in the University of Delaware’s 2021 “Race and Inequality in Delaware” fall seminar conducted their research on the pre-Civil War era, they quickly learned one thing: the lives and histories of Black Americans have often been overlooked, downplayed or misinterpreted in official documents and historical accounts.

The students think that should change — and they hope their work in the seminar can serve as a starting point for Delaware and the University.

“That’s why I wanted to do this [research]said Kate Uray, a senior at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and one of the students who discussed their work during a public presentation Tuesday, Dec. 7, at UD’s Morris Library. . “Because their stories are hard to find, but they are important.”

The seminar included graduate and undergraduate students from various disciplines across campus. Led by Dael Norwood, Assistant Professor of History, and Laura Helton, Assistant Professor of English and History, the students conducted their research using material from the Morris Library Special Collections and University Archives. They focused on the antebellum period from the 1830s to the 1850s, looking specifically at Delaware College (the institution that predated UD), the city of Newark, and other nearby areas.

Reviewing source documents in the Morris Library Special Collections for the class “Race and Inequality in Delaware” are (left to right) Anisha Gupta, doctoral student in preservation studies;  Professor Dael Norwood;  and Tyler Welsh, a senior who specializes in teaching history.

Reviewing source documents in the Morris Library Special Collections for the class “Race and Inequality in Delaware” are (left to right) Anisha Gupta, doctoral student in preservation studies; Professor Dael Norwood; and Tyler Welsh, a senior who specializes in teaching history.

The seminar was the first in a proposed series of new courses exploring race and inequality in Delaware and the University’s own history in the era of slavery and emancipation. Students researched archives, reviewed census and other records, and worked collaboratively with community historians and others.

“This course is about digging in,” Norwood said, calling it “part of a deeper engagement” to expand knowledge about lesser-known aspects of our history. “The search for these students will lead to further research.”

This map of the New London Road area in Newark is from the George G. Evans family papers in the UD Library Special Collections.  Special Collections recently digitized it to help student Anisha Gupta research the community of black residents who bought property and built <a class=homes and churches in this west Newark neighborhood. ” title=” ” class=”cq-dd-image”/>

This map of the New London Road area in Newark is from the George G. Evans family papers in the UD Library Special Collections. Special Collections recently digitized it to help student Anisha Gupta research the community of black residents who bought property and built homes and churches in this west Newark neighborhood.

In presenting the student presentations, titled “Delaware College and Newark in the Age of Slavery, Indentured Labor and Abolition,” Norwood and Helton thanked those who provided resources and shared information. Among them were Sylvester Woolford Jr., professor of history and genealogy and commissioner of the Delaware Heritage Commission; the Arts and Culture Partnership, part of UD’s Community Engagement Initiative; the departments of History, English, Anthropology, African Studies and Geography; the University’s Anti-Racism Initiative; Special Collections at the Morris Library; and University Archives.

The class grew out of the UD Anti-Racism Initiative (UDARI), a grassroots project that was formed in the summer of 2020 by faculty, staff, and students to fight systemic racism nationwide. The initiative, a University-wide effort and commitment, encompasses many topics, including the study of the institution’s own history. Even before the seminar was offered, students were examining the subject in undergraduate research programs and other programs.

The papers of 19th-century Newark community leader George Gillespie Evans are housed in 51 volumes in Special Collections and include a large number of historical business and legal records of the city of Newark and some of its major institutions.

The papers of 19th-century Newark community leader George Gillespie Evans are housed in 51 volumes in Special Collections and include a large number of historical business and legal records of the city of Newark and some of its major institutions.

Earlier this year, UD joined Universities Studying Slavery, a consortium of more than 80 institutions conducting the same type of research, sharing experiences and best practices.

Fall seminar students presented a variety of findings, with many indicating that while Delaware College may not have been explicitly pro-slavery, the institution benefited financially from slavery and other forms of black labor exploited. These other forms of unfree labor included situations in which a slaveholder formally “granted” individuals their freedom but delayed its implementation for long periods of time, meaning they effectively remained enslaved for years. Others may not have been considered property, but were under contract, requiring them to work without pay for a number of years.

This 1851 catalog of Delaware College, with an image of Old College on the cover, is one of many special collections documents that students in the class used as primary sources for their research.

This 1851 catalog of Delaware College, with an image of Old College on the cover, is one of many special collections documents that students in the class used as primary sources for their research.

Delaware College, the students said, received financial support in various ways from wealthy families, many of whom were slaveholders. They cited several examples, including:

  • A university catalog from 1837 lists the 28 members of the board of trustees; research revealed that 18 of them were slavers.

  • Much of the land UD now sits on was once owned by a slave family.

  • Delaware College has received donations and tuition over the years from individuals and families who participated in slavery or black labor exploitation. A fundraising campaign in the 1850s, for example, found that about 20% of the money donated came from slavers and 6% from those using indentured labor.

Students also discussed other findings, including how Black Delaware College workers (usually day laborers or cleaners) used their pay to invest in the surrounding community, renting or buying land and houses and building churches in the New London Road area of ​​western Newark. . This black community has endured for more than a century.

And after

The History Department is expected to offer the seminar course, HIST 460/660: Race and Inequality in Delaware, each year, including during the 2022-2023 academic year. Other planned projects include courses on the global history of racism, community workshops and other public awareness activities.

Video of the December 7 student lectures, which were presented virtually and recorded, along with online audience questions, is posted on the UD Library website under Recorded Events.

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Sidney Poitier was the star we desperately needed him to be https://chattahoocheetrace.com/sidney-poitier-was-the-star-we-desperately-needed-him-to-be/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:31:52 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/sidney-poitier-was-the-star-we-desperately-needed-him-to-be/ Who did more with less? From whom were we expected less than more? Who had more eyes and more daggers, more hopes and fears and intentions directed towards his person, his skill and, by extension, his people? Race shouldn’t matter here. But it has to be, since Hollywood has made the case with its race. […]]]>

Who did more with less? From whom were we expected less than more? Who had more eyes and more daggers, more hopes and fears and intentions directed towards his person, his skill and, by extension, his people? Race shouldn’t matter here. But it has to be, since Hollywood has made the case with its race. Film after film, he insisted he was the black man of white America, which was fine with him, of course. He was black. But Sidney Poitier’s radical shock was his fame’s emphasis on “the man.” Human.

Let’s say Poitier had a good 20 year star career, from 1958 when “The Defiant Ones” came out, to 1978 when the last of his hit trilogy starring Bill Cosby left theaters. He made about one movie a year, many of which are unforgettable. On the one hand, it’s fame. On the other: Poitier achieved its greatness partly as a matter of “despite”. He achieved everything he did knowing what he couldn’t do. I mean, he could’ve done it – could’ve played Cool Hand Luke, could’ve been the graduate, could’ve done “Bullitt,” could’ve been Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. There are maybe a dozen roles, crownings, that no one would have offered Poitier because he wouldn’t have been good for the role.

I believe with all my heart that Poitier was as crucial in the odyssey of freedom and equality for black Americans – for personality – as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman, as Martin Luther King Jr. A clear descendant of Douglass’ rhetorical brilliance, he spoke the white words but with his own mouth. His projected image spawned what is now a galaxy of other black actors, acting as diverse and on many levels as a mall.

Black artists in this country carry the curious and hilarious burden of history. Their work must move forward; answer, question, sit with, and not know. Take, risk. Do not only more, but often the most. He must also thwart and dispel; it must come undone. Poitier was the great failing of American art.

In the movies, the black figures were cheerful statues – hoisting luggage, serving food, looking after children – meant to adorn a white American’s dream. Acting could be a prison affair. Poitier arrived at the start of the civil rights movement, in time to bring out the black image of the prison of the pre-war eras and of the minstrel. He was hardly the first to try. He just drove more people further than any other artist. Of course, what followed instead was complicated: a sort of prisoner swap.

This business of undoing is delicate. The defaulter must be both historical and bearer of history. Thus Poitier was accused of being all sorts of Uncle Tom, because the task of undoing tended to require collaboration with whites. It is what they have done or what has been done in their name that must be undone. The collaborative act opened all parties to the opprobrium of their respective peoples. On September 10, 1967, at the height of Poitier, this newspaper published a scathing article by Clifford Mason which asked: “Why does white America love Poitier?”

Poitier’s best friend was Harry Belafonte; even he had his worries. “Sidney exuded a truly holy calm and dignity,” Belafonte wrote in his memoir, “My Song.” “I didn’t want to tone down my sexuality either. Sidney has done this in every role he’s played. I don’t want to put all the rap on race. Sidney is a wonderful actor, and he has mesmerized audiences with all of his performances. But he knows as well as I do that these nuances were fundamental to his success. This holiness was John Guare’s delightfully bitter “Six Degrees of Separation” joke – that a sure way for a con artist to enter the hearts and homes of Manhattan’s white elite was to pass himself off as the son. BCBG de Poitier, the father of four daughters.

The Poitiers gallery, made up of highly educated, bright and attractive figures, was to be fit to enter white houses, but also attractive to worried blacks that he might think himself too good to dine at home. It was as much of an enigma in 1958 as it was, say, half a century later, when the country conducted an experiment to discover the appropriate measure of darkness for a president. Like Barack Obama, Poitier was punctual, culturally. He became the star he made because he was the star we desperately needed him to be. And even then he couldn’t please all of us.

It remains to imagine how much bigger could have been. No romances – none where the woman was not literally blind, as she was in “A Patch of Blue”, none where the problem was not the romance itself, where the romance was not in trouble because of him. Nothing with Audrey Hepburn or Grace Kelly, Marilyn Monroe or Doris Day. No one has dared to use it in a love story to make previous stars of Cicely Tyson or Ruby Dee, or greater Diahann Carroll, the love of their offscreen life. The cinematic romance he and Carroll had in 1961’s “Paris Blues” was a timeshare with Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. Poitier has been denied opportunities that we can never prove he was turned down.

We can reasonably deduce, however, that it could have been bigger than it was. But he also managed to be as tall as he got, which in itself is a wow. He had the best 1967 and 68 of them all. Three box office hits – “To Sir, With Love,” “In the Heat of the Night,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” two of them competing for Best Oscar nominated film (“Heat” a won), Oscars for two of his co-stars.

Years ago, when cinema was still the dominant art form in the country, the American Film Institute released a countdown of the greatest stars of all time who debuted before or in 1950. The number one in the men’s category was not Sidney Poitier, who just hit the list deadline. (It was Humphrey Bogart.) He wasn’t even # 10. (Charlie Chaplin.) No, the big American movie star was at No. 22, just ahead of Robert Mitchum and behind three of the Marx Brothers.

But let’s apply some cynical pressure here. What did the people who made Poitier 22 on this list of the greatest actors think he justified being still so high? There were 49 other people, split evenly between women and men. He is the only non-white person. Even now, I suspect that Poitier’s legacy has really reduced to its primacy. And that’s not nothing either. He was summoned to symbolize black America, on his own; receive kudos from his white peers when they made him the first black man to accept their Oscar (for building a church for German nuns in “Lilies of the Field”). And so the milestone is achievement.

Poitier’s primacy is what puts him at the top of all home and front page pages on the day he died. But what does he leave? Very well! – that’s what makes him the greatest. Like all the big stars before him – Clark Gable, Bette Davis, John Wayne, Humphrey Bogart, Mae West – Poitier gave birth to being in a movie. His less inspired line readings retain a spark of passion. Each word – words which could sometimes constitute the dregs of the English language (“the agonies, the torments, the humiliations … all these elements are the natural elements from which the key is forged”, said Poitier, like the enslaved insurrectionist Rau mingled -Ru, in the indescribable “Band of Angels” of 1957 – seemed to come from his head.

His most daring work turned out to be a sustained performance of himself. I know: it’s the only job of a star. But that of Poitier was an ego that he forged, sculpted and refined, an ego which, if it bore only the scent of an insular education, carried a note of exotic mystery. Even when they dressed him as a space pimp in “The Long Ships” he wasn’t just a movie nigger character, like the ancestral cartoons that made him necessary and the car full. tough guys who thrived in its wake – the Sweetbacks, Wells and Priests, Hammers and Dolemites. No one had known someone like him before. It is enough to listen to the meter of its rhythm, the melody of this one. When he spoke, you heard a symphony. Its lack of a location gave it the same advantageous appeal as other stars without a location.

The game he played required every inch of his long body – for exuberance, rapture, prudence, solemnity and rage. In no conventional sense, a character from Sidney Poitier has never danced successfully. (When he is cutting a mat, you should keep a tourniquet close at hand.) Yet all of his characters move forward with grace and poise. Part of this is training; he was our most famous Black Method actor. The rest is just him. Clenched fists and mid-walk pivots, arms clenched and arms open – it was all his own ballet. They were signature movements, a star making an exclamatory punctuation of its being, wearing itself in cursive. The signature of what this country has always sworn to be.

© 2022 The New York Times Company


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Entry of Novak Djokovic’s vaccine exemption in Australia delayed https://chattahoocheetrace.com/entry-of-novak-djokovics-vaccine-exemption-in-australia-delayed/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 16:32:24 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/entry-of-novak-djokovics-vaccine-exemption-in-australia-delayed/ Novak Djokovic’s entry into Australia on a vaccine exemption has been delayed due to issues with the visa he and his team submitted. After landing in Melbourne, the 20-time Grand Slam winner reportedly attempted to enter the country on a visa that does not allow medical exemptions for non-vaccination, and when the Border Force contacted […]]]>

Novak Djokovic’s entry into Australia on a vaccine exemption has been delayed due to issues with the visa he and his team submitted.

After landing in Melbourne, the 20-time Grand Slam winner reportedly attempted to enter the country on a visa that does not allow medical exemptions for non-vaccination, and when the Border Force contacted government officials in Victoria to sponsor the visa, they refused to do so. so.

The Serb arrived in Melbourne on Wednesday evening local time but encountered problems at the border, with acting Sports Minister Jaala Pulford confirming that the state government was not backing his visa application to participate in the Open from Australia.

She tweeted: “The federal government has asked if we will support Novak Djokovic’s visa application to enter Australia.

“We will not be providing Novak Djokovic with individual assistance with visa applications to participate in the 2022 Australian Open Grand Slam.

“We have always been clear on two points: visa approvals are the responsibility of the federal government and medical exemptions are the responsibility of physicians. “

On Tuesday, the 34-year-old Serb revealed he had an “exemption permit” to travel and play at the Australian Open without a Covid-19 vaccination.

Djokovic never disclosed if he was vaccinated against Covid-19, but criticized warrants stating that players must be double-bitten.

The response to Tuesday’s confirmation of the exemption was strongly negative, both in Australia and globally, and eventually saw Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison confirm that Djokovic would be “on the next plane home” if his evidence of a Covid-19 vaccination exemption playing at the Australian Open is not satisfactory.

“There should be no special rules for Novak Djokovic, none at all,” Prime Minister Morrison said.

“He has to do this because if he is not vaccinated he has to provide acceptable proof that he cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons and to be able to access the same travel arrangements as fully vaccinated travelers.”

Rules for Victoria, where the Australian Open kicks off on January 17, stipulated that players must be doubly vaccinated against Covid-19.

Tournament director Craig Tiley said earlier that it would be “helpful” for Djokovic to clarify his situation on what exempts him from vaccination.

“We understand and fully understand that some would have been upset that Novak Djokovic had come because of his statements about vaccination over the past two years,” Tiley told reporters.

“We would love… Novak to talk about it and help us out, but in the end, that will be up to him.

“We are not in a position, even legally, to disclose the medical information of other people.”

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Morrison’s comments were echoed by a statement from Australian Home Secretary Karen Andrews.

“The Australian Border Force will continue to ensure that those arriving at our border comply with our strict border requirements,” the statement read.

“No individual participating in the Australian Open will receive special treatment.”

Tiley revealed that 26 unvaccinated players had requested an exemption, with Djokovic being just a “handful” given the nod according to guidelines set by federal regulators.

The criteria listed by the Australian Technical Advisory Group as eligible reasons for medical exemption range from major acute medical conditions to any serious adverse event attributed to a previous dose of Covid-19 vaccine.

One possible explanation is that Djokovic contracted coronavirus for the second time at some point in the past six months, having already caught it during his much-criticized Adria Tour event in Belgrade in 2020.

This would negate the need for the vaccination, according to rules released last year by one of the two independent medical panels involved in the decision.

The preparation for the first grand slam of the season was dominated by the participation of Djokovic.

Speculation has escalated after he withdrew from the Serbian squad participating in the ATP Cup in Sydney without explanation.

The tournament offers Djokovic another chance to set himself apart from rivals Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, the three of whom have each won 20 Grand Slam titles.

He was a challenge for the grand slam of the calendar year in 2021, but failed in the US Open final by losing to Daniil Medvedev, the man he beat in the final of the Australian Open last year.


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100 years ago Nosferatu defined the vampire movie https://chattahoocheetrace.com/100-years-ago-nosferatu-defined-the-vampire-movie/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:16:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/100-years-ago-nosferatu-defined-the-vampire-movie/ Over the years, the vampire has functioned as a multi-faceted metaphor on celluloid. Prior to “Nosferatu”, the vampire was an attractive figure, usually a female who brought about the downfall of a man in accordance with the backward gender policy of the time. “Nosferatu” brought out the most monstrous aspects of the vampire. In Stoker’s […]]]>

Over the years, the vampire has functioned as a multi-faceted metaphor on celluloid. Prior to “Nosferatu”, the vampire was an attractive figure, usually a female who brought about the downfall of a man in accordance with the backward gender policy of the time. “Nosferatu” brought out the most monstrous aspects of the vampire.

In Stoker’s novel – which is in the public domain and available online for free through The Gutenberg Project – the author gives a detailed physical description of Orlok’s literary analogue, Count Dracula, just before the famous phrase “Listen -the – the children of the night. What music they make! ”Her Dracula has an aquiline nose, bushy eyebrows, pointy teeth, and pointy ears.

Orlok reflects these characteristics, the total of which forms a rat’s face on screen, despite headings comparing him to “the bird of death calling your name at midnight.” As the Jewish culture website Alma points out, Orlok also comes to Wisborg “surrounded by rats, an animal that Jews were frequently compared to in Europe at the time.” His bald head aligns more with the anti-Semitic cartoons that prevailed on the covers of dime and other novels in the early 20th century.

It should be noted that a Jewish actor, Alexander Granach, plays a leading role in “Nosferatu” as a Renfield-style real estate agent, Knock, who displays similar characteristics and whose name is reminiscent of the myth of the incoming vampires. in the houses by invitation only. In his autobiography, Granach wrote that Murnau was “always chivalrous” and defended him against anti-Semitic attacks. Whether or not the director consciously wanted Orlok to reflect stereotypes, the fact remains that prejudices were brewing in his country, where a deep fear and hatred of the Other took root in the aftermath of the First War. global.


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10 of the most unique Airbnbs in and around San Antonio https://chattahoocheetrace.com/10-of-the-most-unique-airbnbs-in-and-around-san-antonio/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 20:33:36 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/10-of-the-most-unique-airbnbs-in-and-around-san-antonio/ Glamping! Ruby Unique feature: Go camping without compromising on comfort among an eclectic range of colorful vintage caravans. The property includes many garden games and cooking tools. You are also a short drive from Crescent Bend Nature Park. Site: Cibolo Starting rate: $ 80 per night Small Houses in Pipe Creek Unique feature: Greg and […]]]>

Glamping! Ruby

Unique feature: Go camping without compromising on comfort among an eclectic range of colorful vintage caravans. The property includes many garden games and cooking tools. You are also a short drive from Crescent Bend Nature Park.

Site: Cibolo

Starting rate: $ 80 per night

Small Houses in Pipe Creek

Unique feature: Greg and Jamie Otterman’s first cottage near Pipe Creek was such a success that they recently opened a second cottage known as The Nest. The couple stock the kitchen with farm-fresh eggs from their own chicken coop and other breakfast supplies and are known to provide special treats like s’mores kits for special occasions. The houses are built to help guests enjoy the beauty of the natural surroundings and the Ottermans have also created two private hiking trails for visitors to enjoy. The Getaway is a great place to feel ‘in the woods’ while still being close enough to drive to Fredericksburg, Bandera or Helotes for a day trip.

Site: Pipe Creek

Starting rate: $ 151- $ 161

Gray Forest Cottages (Robert Wood Art Studio)

Unique feature: This historic rock cottage is on the site of the former home and studio of famous landscape painter Robert Wood. Many of his 1930s and 1940s oil masterpieces were created here. Enjoy the fire pit right outside the front door and quick access to Six Flags Fiesta Texas, Helotes, and Government Canyon State Natural Area.

Site: Gray Forest (Northwest of San Antonio)

Starting rate: $ 125 per night

Lambermont Castle, North

Unique feature: This historic house (and event venue) was built in 1894 to imitate the castles of Belgium. The first floor is a common area for all guests and has a library, a music room and a traditional lounge.

Site: near Fort Sam Houston and Pearl

Starting rate: $ 150 per night

Parrots Hilton Studio at Enchanted Cottage

Unique feature: This charming private cottage rivals those from fairy tales. Go through the rose-covered arch doors and you may be visited by the owners’ parrots, who live in an aviary on the property.

Site: between the Deco District and Woodlawn Lake Park

Starting rate: $ 85 per night

Exotic play lodge

Unique feature: This high-end hunting cabin is backed by a game ranch where zebras, donkeys, giant tortoises and other exotic animals roam. The owner provides corn so you can feed the animals as they approach the fence. It sleeps 12 and is perfect for a crowd.

Site: Far North San Antonio near Timberwood Park

Starting rate: $ 395 per night

Briam Cottage filled with art

Unique featureDescribed as a functional art gallery, this 1870s cottage features stone walls each adorned with colorful artwork.

Site: Southtown

Price: $ 153 per night

Casa Lejana

Unique feature: Translated as ‘away from home’, Casa Lejana is the perfect getaway with a rich history dating back to the 1930s. During his lifetime it was the municipal swimming pool of the Helotes, a former ranch house and a family restaurant. The property has multiple casitas and the owners can work with you to book multiple casitas together if you are hosting a group.

Site: Helots

Starting rate: $ 131 per night

Redwood house

Unique feature: Stay in nature with this treehouse built around a concrete tree and (during warmer months) quick access to a walk-in pool. The house can accommodate eight people and has a large patio so you can spend most of your getaway outdoors.

Site: New Braunfels

Starting rate: $ 322 per night

The Oge house

Unique feature: This historic pre-war mansion in the historic King William district has been restored and updated with modern comforts. With seven bedrooms, the house is perfect for family reunions or large gatherings.

Site: King William Historic District

Starting rate: $ 1,807 per night


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Horry residents aim to protect graves near major development https://chattahoocheetrace.com/horry-residents-aim-to-protect-graves-near-major-development/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 14:16:50 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/horry-residents-aim-to-protect-graves-near-major-development/ Bourgeois The graves weren’t very far from each other, but they were drastically different. In part of the informal and scattered cemetery was buried Harry Days, a black man of the first generation of Gullahs born in freedom, rather than slavery, in Horry County. His life was not easy and he had to cultivate and […]]]>

The graves weren’t very far from each other, but they were drastically different.

In part of the informal and scattered cemetery was buried Harry Days, a black man of the first generation of Gullahs born in freedom, rather than slavery, in Horry County. His life was not easy and he had to cultivate and do other manual labor to make a living, said his great-great-granddaughter, Dr Veronica Gerald Floyd, but he was born free and cherished. Unlike other blacks buried in the area, Days’ grave had a gravestone, although its inscription has been faded by time and time and difficult to read.

Not far away, however, was John Green’s grave. Green married the daughter of Joshua John Ward, the owner of more slaves in the United States than anyone in the prewar south. Green, having married in immense wealth, had a large gravestone heavily engraved above his burial which extolled his virtues. Green, he said, was “an honest man, a good citizen, a loving husband and an exemplary Christian.”

Days and Green are buried in what may seem an unlikely location: near the 13th hole of the Blackmoor Golf Course in the Burgess Area, County of Southern Horry.

But it was the location of the men’s graves – along with dozens more, marked and unmarked – that raised serious concerns for black residents of Burgess. Long before the informal graveyard stood beside a golf course, it was part of Ward’s Plantation Collection, earning him the title ‘King of the Rice Planters’. The people enslaved by Ward buried their dead on the plantation, and later, after emancipation, the descendants of those once enslaved continued to bury their loved ones near other family members. Residents of the Burgess area say the practice continued into the 1960s in some families.

This means that today, along Blackmoor’s 13th Fairway, 100 or more people are buried, according to local historians and county technicians.

And residents of the community of Burgess fear that a planned major development nearby – 3,800 new homes on 706 acres – may inadvertently damage the graves, meaning pieces of black history in the area could be damaged or lost.

“My main thing right now is to do something to protect these three cemeteries,” said Cad Holmes, a local historian who has ancestors buried in the cemeteries. “This is where all of our ancestors are. They worked hard, they provided for our needs.

These concerns have sparked a local effort to protect historic cemeteries which some residents believe could be damaged by new development. Decisions on development and cemeteries will take place in 2022; the project must still be the subject of a new hearing before the town planning commission, as well as three hearings before the departmental council. The end of February is the earliest date the project could be approved.

And such approval could be difficult to obtain. Al Jordan, president of the Greater Burgess Community Association, said on Friday his group opposed the project, calling the plans “incomplete” and stressing concerns about the lack of infrastructure in the area. Other Burgess residents earlier this month said they were concerned about traffic jams and wrecks on SC 707, flooding and nearby schools that are already overcapacity.

And then there is the issue of cemeteries.

Holmes and others fear that the construction of new homes, apartment buildings, shops and parking lots on the nearby 706-acre lot will force additional stormwater into the area where the graves are located, damaging them. Horry County building standards require new homes to be built above flood levels, meaning a number of properties on the fully developed land could force water down into cemeteries, residents worry.

Part of that worry is due to the flatness of Horry County and the way the water flows. Near the Burgess region, for example, swamps, streams, the Waccamaw River, and the Intracoastal Waterway all come together to empty into Winyah Bay. But this water can only flow during low tides, about two or three hours a day, which means the area is full of swamps and wetlands. Burgess people like Holmes fear that changing this balance could flood cemeteries.

“I know we can’t stop the project, but they should come up with a plan that helps us,” Holmes said at a community meeting in Burgess on Tuesday. “They have to do something not to help us, to protect us, to protect us from further damage to the cemetery.”

A basic effort begins

Due to these fears that the cemeteries, believed to contain former slaves as well as generations of Burgess residents, the residents of Burgess began last week to ensure developers and the county protect the burial grounds.

With more than a dozen Burgess residents crammed into golf carts, Holmes led a caravan of graveyard-concerned people along the Blackmoor course to the 13th hole on Friday. Maps, showing ground-penetrating radar data, show three separate burial sites, all close together, along the 13th fairway. Using these maps, Holmes pointed to various burials, noting that many are unmarked because families ran out of money for gravestones. Several graves, Holmes said, have stainless steel lids to protect them from the elements.

Once residents arrived at the cemetery sites, they deployed, searching for marked graves and looking for clues that might point to unmarked graves. Radar data shows more than 100 graves between the three sites, although only about a dozen are marked. And of these, only a handful have gravestones.

On Friday, Lou Conklin, a senior planner with the Horry County Planning and Zoning Department, specializing in the preservation of graves and cemeteries, accompanied Holmes and the other residents. She said the developers of the 706-acre plot – near the corner of Salem Road and SC 707 – had found a recent burial at the site, but had yet to identify any others. County planners sometimes use ground-penetrating radar detection to find graves, although such an investigation has yet to be carried out at the planned development site. Some residents of Burgess are concerned that graves of former slaves may be found at the site.

Conklin explained on Friday that although South Carolina state law prohibits the destruction of a grave or cemetery, neither the state nor the county has strict requirements to ensure that burials do not not take place on land prior to the construction of a new construction. Typically, she said, developers or county planners will conduct a review of historical documents to find cemeteries or graves that are not marked, but no specific search method is required by the national or local law.

Simply because destroying cemeteries is illegal, she said. “That doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen.”

“The developers call us sometimes and say, ‘Look, we know there’s a graveyard over there, do you know where it’s at? Can you rate it for us? And we tagged them and stuff like that, ”Conklin said. “I will try to do whatever I can to help people save cemeteries.”

Preserving Black History

At the Burgess community meeting on Tuesday, Holmes pitched the idea of ​​building a dike or some edge around the graveyard to keep water out, although it’s not yet clear whether the developers or county leaders will consider such an idea.

Still, Holmes and other members of the Burgess community insist that it is essential to keep the cemetery intact. Holmes even said he had seen part of it destroyed before, when he worked for Grand Strand Water & Sewer. During a job, he said, when Blackmoor’s course was first developed, he recalled seeing machines digging mounds of earth with strewn gravestones in them. He called the US Army Corp of Engineers, who put the project on hold, but the tombstones were eventually lost.

Other residents, as they inspected the cemetery, realized that they had great-great-grandparents or other relatives buried there. And for locals like Gerald Floyd, the cemetery offered a way to honor their ancestors. On Friday, she took her 18-year-old grandson, Cameron Davies, to see Days’ grave with her. Seeing the grave was so powerful, said Gerald Floyd, it seemed surreal.

“(See the grave) it’s good because I have worked for years to get to this day. Now to see the world truly recognize the importance of culture (gullah) is surreal, ”said Gerald Floyd, professor emeritus at Coastal Carolina University. “It’s like I’m above, watching.”

Davies could only find one word to describe the sight of the grave: “Unbelievable,” he said. “It’s incredible.”

This story was originally published 20 December 2021 09:16.

Related Stories from Myrtle Beach Sun News

J. Dale Shoemaker covers Horry County Government with an emphasis on government transparency, data and how county government serves residents. Graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 2016, he previously covered the City of Pittsburgh government for the nonprofit media PublicSource and worked on the Data & Investigations team at nj.com in New Jersey. Recipient of several local and national awards, the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania and the Society of Professional Journalists, Keystone State Chapter, recognized him in 2019 for his investigation into a problematic Pittsburgh Police Department tech entrepreneur, a series that has headed the Pittsburgh City Council. enact a new law on the transparency of city contracts. You can share tips with Dale at dshoemaker@thesunnews.com.


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As the Black Bard of the South, Randall Kenan toppled monuments https://chattahoocheetrace.com/as-the-black-bard-of-the-south-randall-kenan-toppled-monuments/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 10:00:03 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/as-the-black-bard-of-the-south-randall-kenan-toppled-monuments/ In Zeke’s version, before the Civil War, runaway slaves led by a man named Pharaoh founded a “brown society” on the land where Tims Creek now stands. Pharaoh was captured and sold to “the family in North Carolina at this time,” becoming the “No. 1” slave, man’s most precious possession, finds his way deeper into […]]]>

In Zeke’s version, before the Civil War, runaway slaves led by a man named Pharaoh founded a “brown society” on the land where Tims Creek now stands. Pharaoh was captured and sold to “the family in North Carolina at this time,” becoming the “No. 1” slave, man’s most precious possession, finds his way deeper into the favor of his master before finally escaping for good, setting the plantation on fire in its wake.

Edited and with exhaustive footnotes and an introduction (dated 2000 at the time) by Jimmy’s parent, Reginald Gregory Kain (who shares Kenan’s credentials and initials), “Leave the Dead bury their dead ”is a story in a -in-a-book story, an ingeniously metafictional Russian doll with gleefully unreliable storytelling. Yet one way or another, whether because of regional or racial prejudices, or the author’s deep-rooted humility and privacy, Kenan did not take his place. returns to the postmodern canon, though Tims Creek has proven to be as generator as any Macondo or Yoknapatawpha.

But Kenan’s myth-making wasn’t just for craft or genre: overall, his fiction amounts to a personal overthrow of monuments, like the removal of the bronze Silent Sam from the UNC campus in 2018. In Zeke Cross’s story, it is not his namesake white man but the black escapee, Pharaoh, who appears as the true pioneer, the folk hero, the founding father.

To the naked eye, the true County of Duplin is not romantic, let alone magical. In this deeply Christian working-class corner of rural North Carolina, surrounded by miles of swamp and farmland in the major cities of Raleigh and Wilmington, unassuming Baptist churches are as common as pig farms. The houses, whether colonial style or mobile, are protected by thin white crosses at the junction of alleys and country roads.

On one of these roads, somewhere along the 13 mile stretch of Highway 41 between the town of Wallace and Chinquapin, there is a billboard to visit the restored Liberty Hall plantation. “Southern Antebellum was once praised for its grace and charm,” its website says. The site “presents itself today as a proud reminder of an era that only exists in the history books”.

On this same road also stands another sign, more subtle, marking the private land of the Kenan family cemetery. Randall Kenan is buried miles away, in a plot by a side road marked only by a single pear tree, next to Mary Kenan Hall. It’s tempting to project onto his unadorned burial ground a loneliness known only to the living, but Kenan had an uncanny ability to see the mystic in the mundane. As the Crosses teach us again and again: It is not because a place does not announce itself that it is not there.


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9 charming South Carolina towns that could star in an iconic Christmas movie https://chattahoocheetrace.com/9-charming-south-carolina-towns-that-could-star-in-an-iconic-christmas-movie/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 13:30:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/9-charming-south-carolina-towns-that-could-star-in-an-iconic-christmas-movie/ South Carolina is rich in history, beautiful beaches, friendly locals, and much more, but snow isn’t one of them. However, the lack of white precipitation does nothing to dampen the Christmas spirit in South Carolina cities, nor does it make those towns less worthy of Hallmark Christmas’s movie town status. Likewise, each city has its […]]]>

South Carolina is rich in history, beautiful beaches, friendly locals, and much more, but snow isn’t one of them. However, the lack of white precipitation does nothing to dampen the Christmas spirit in South Carolina cities, nor does it make those towns less worthy of Hallmark Christmas’s movie town status.

Likewise, each city has its own unique look, feel and history; each also has its own Christmas vibe. With so many delicious destinations to choose from, it’s impossible to choose among them. But here is a small sample of brilliant South Carolina towns where all of your Hallmark Christmas movie dreams can come true.

Statue of Joel Michael BoylePoinsett on Main Street Greenville (Photo credit: Michael Boyle)

1. Greenville

America’s friendliest city, Greenville, boosts the welcoming warmth and hospitality over Christmas. Glittering tree-lined sidewalks on Main Street. Santa is sliding down the street in his motorized sleigh (a converted 1993 Ford Aerostar). Ice skaters sliding themselves in a mini replica of Rockefeller Center. These are some of Greenville’s favorite things, and Hallmark movie-style events keep happening.

Christmas carols in the streets, dozens of giant trees decorated in bright colors at local hotels for the annual Tree Festival competition, as well as a community Hanukkah celebration and Menorah lighting create a complete holiday experience . Of course, Greenville has a Holiday Kringle Parade and Market with craft vendors, rides, entertainment, tours with Santa, food, and a beer garden at Fluor Field baseball stadium.

Pro tip: Stay at the Westin 4 Diamond Poinsett Hotel. In front of the building stands a statue of South Carolina, Joel Poinsett, who brought a certain popular Christmas plant to America.

Christmas tree on Aiken Alley in Aiken, South Carolina.
Christmas tree on Aiken Alley (Photo credit: Mark Hudson)

2. Aiken

A visit to Aiken is a joy anytime of the year, but during the holidays this charming equestrian town becomes the perfect place to star in a Hallmark Christmas movie. Even the horses trot in the holiday spirit during the Hoofbeats And Christmas Carols Parade through the city center. Horses and carriages, as well as dogs walking their humans, create a festive atmosphere, with songs from the community after the parade.

Santa at the Depot gives toddlers the chance to tell him how good they have been at the Visitor Center and Aiken Train Museum with festive decorations, music and a special gift for each child .

The annual Aiken Jaycees Christmas Parade, the Night of 1000 Lights and a leisurely stroll through the well-lit garden paths at the annual Christmas in Hopelands event bring locals and visitors together to celebrate the warmth and joy of the holidays. Other such opportunities can be found at the Christmas Craft Show and Christmas Crafts at the Farmers Market, where shopping and camaraderie go hand in hand.

Christmas trees at the Old Grist Mill in McCormick, South Carolina.
Christmas trees at the Old Grist Mill (Photo credit: Nathan Elliott / Savannah Shoreline Magazine)

3. McCormick

For a pretty town of less than 3,000 people, McCormick makes the holiday season shine with big celebrations, just like in a Hallmark Christmas movie.

To help everyone get into Hallmark movie mode, the 2021 Holiday on Main (HOM) Christmas Parade is themed “Cultivating a Branded Christmas”. Of course, Santa Claus is ready to have fun and take pictures.

The Holiday Market at Cotton Gin, featuring local and regional artisans selling unique handcrafted creations, as well as the Festival of Trees at Grist Mill make excellent use of McCormick’s historic sites.

Father Christmas and his elves attend the tree lighting ceremony. And everyone is counting the days until the Chamber of Commerce Cookie Walk. A $ 10 advance ticket purchase purchases more than 25 individual cookies or baked goods from participating local businesses.

Pro tip: You can download a digital version of the HOM brochure and flyers.

Santa Claus with a dog in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.
Courtesy of Discover South Carolina

4. Myrtle Beach

Who says you can’t have a Hallmark Christmas at the beach? Certainly not Santa Claus, nor the locals of Myrtle Beach and the visitors who make Christmas merry in this coastal town.

Start with Winter Wonderland at The Beach, a vacation event that includes an indoor outdoor ice rink, a walk through the lights experience, and other vacation events at Burroughs and Chapin Pavilion Place. Then admire the magnificent spectacle of The Great Christmas Light Show, where you can walk through over 2 million twinkling lights at North Myrtle Beach Park and Sports Complex.

The Southern Christmas Show, a Myrtle Beach tradition, brings the warm Christmas spirit to life with music, comedy and dancing.

Night of a Thousand Candles at Brookgreen Gardens (Courtesy Discover South Carolina)

5. Murrells Inlet

One of the oldest and smallest towns on the Grand Strand, Murrells Inlet was once a peaceful fishing village. Today, it is a popular place for vacationers. But during the holidays, Murrells Inlet gives off a true Hallmark Christmas movie vibe.

The highlight of the season is the Nights of a Thousand Candles at Brookgreen Gardens, a wonderful extravaganza of over 2,800 hand-lit candles and countless twinkling lights illuminating the magnificent sculpture gardens. Visitors wander the trails, marveling at the seasonal lighting, decorations and an 80-foot tree dressed in 70,000 lights.

During the annual Santa Crawl on the MarshWalk, revelers walk the promenade along a natural saltwater estuary, enjoying drinks and special dinners at MarshWalk restaurants. MarshWalk is also the location of the annual Christmas Parade

Pro tip: Myrtle Beach is 20 minutes from Murrells Inlet, making a double dose of vacation fun a realistic goal.

Brooks Street Christmas lights in Manning, South Carolina.
Christmas lights on Brooks Street (Photo credit: Clarendon County Chamber of Commerce)

6. The workforce

The quiet streets lined with majestic oak trees and pre-war houses make the historic town of Manning a pleasure to visit. Located about 65 miles from Columbia, the capital of South Carolina, this quaint town could star in a Hallmark Christmas movie.

Manning might not necessarily be a beehive of organized vacation activities, but the city is brilliantly illuminated, lovingly decorated, and full of warmth and whimsy. It is the ideal place for a relaxed and peaceful vacation.

Each year, the people of Manning come together to enjoy the Parade of Lights, which runs through the city spreading joy just after Thanksgiving. The illuminated trees cast their merry glow on Manning until the start of the new year.

“Don’t Get Your Tinsel in a Tangle” is Carolina Dance Academy’s annual Christmas show. The festive evening begins with an energetic gymnastics program and ends with a lively dance performance.

Christmas tree in Abbeville, South Carolina, town square.
Simon Lock / MyEclecticImages

7. Abbeville

The charming little town of Abbeville knows how to think big. It is home to the Abbeville Opera House and Parson’s Mountain Recreation Area. Abbeville also knows how to throw together the kind of holiday celebration that would suit any Hallmark Christmas movie.

This city goes out of its way to support local businesses, especially during the holidays. Handmade for the Holidays is an arts and crafts festival featuring items produced by local vendors. The Christmas Market is a 2-day family event at Crate and Quill, featuring holiday shopping, live Christmas music in the courtyard, and goodies.

Annual Abbeville Christmas tree lighting involves more than flipping a switch. Holiday entertainment, hot chocolate and cookies, all provided by local businesses, infuse the event with warmth and joy.

The friendly Abbeville residents look forward to their annual Breakfast with Santa Claus, a traditional hometown Christmas parade, the Cookie Walk, and the Ugly Christmas Sweater Wine Walk. Is not it ?

Aerial view of the Christmas Market in Pendleton, South Carolina.
Aerial view of Pendleton Christmas Market (Photo Credit: Simon Lock / MyEclecticImages)

8. Pendleton

4 miles from the college town of Clemson, Pendleton feels like another world. Life moves more slowly, no one is a foreigner and the city’s history is fascinating. So the transformation into a Hallmark Christmas movie town for the holidays is, like Pendleton herself, sweet and sweet.

Every weekend from late November to mid-December, residents of Pendleton meet at Christkindlmarkt, a quaint European-style Christmas market on the city’s historic Village Green. Major holiday shopping becomes less stressful amid the bright and cheerful sights, sounds and smells of the marketplace. A 40-foot living Christmas tree watches shoppers as they shop for original, hand-crafted ornaments, feast on local goodies, and sip holiday drinks.

Many locals attend the annual Christmas parade and light the trees in the square. No sane cranky would even dream of trying to steal Christmas from Pendleton.

Pro tip: Head to Mama Rae’s Ice Cream Shoppe for a special Christmas hot chocolate topped with whipped cream and two candy canes arranged in a heart shape.

Illuminated Santa Claus sign in Rock Hill, South Carolina.
Courtesy of Discover South Carolina

9. The rocky hill

The town of Rock Hill can keep visitors busy for days, especially during the holidays. The old town magically transforms into ChristmasVille, an award-winning holiday village and outdoor art festival that makes great Hallmark Christmas film material.

Locals and visitors alike take part in over 70 Christmas-themed events that keep them in the Christmas spirit. Horse-drawn carriage rides, Christmas carols, a gingerbread house-making contest, children’s activities with Santa Claus and ice-skating are just a few of the many delicacies that individuals and families can enjoy.

The festival is held in honor of Vernon Grant, whose magical art has graced many children’s books. However, he is best known for his creation of SNAP! CRACKLE! and POP! characters for Kellogg’s Rice Krispies brand of cereal. Vernon Grant is still a prominent figure in his old Rock Hill home. His charming illustrations of gnomes, elves and Santa Claus make their cheerful appearances throughout the festival.


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LaGrange, Georgia: Five Reasons You Should Know About This Thriving Southern City. https://chattahoocheetrace.com/lagrange-georgia-five-reasons-you-should-know-about-this-thriving-southern-city/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 22:59:55 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/lagrange-georgia-five-reasons-you-should-know-about-this-thriving-southern-city/ Treats in the streets steeped in history In the city center, Lafayette Square is the epicenter of culture, history and commerce. Featuring a magnificent circular fountain and a statue of the Marquis de Lafayette, a hero of the War of Independence who helped give the city its name, Lafayette Square is lined with local businesses, […]]]>
  1. Treats in the streets steeped in history

In the city center, Lafayette Square is the epicenter of culture, history and commerce. Featuring a magnificent circular fountain and a statue of the Marquis de Lafayette, a hero of the War of Independence who helped give the city its name, Lafayette Square is lined with local businesses, antique shops and shops, museums and restaurants. Explore treasures of timeless finds and eye-catching pieces you never thought you needed (and won’t find anywhere else). Walk out of the square and admire pre-war homes, national monuments and the reason for the region’s historic appeal.

A few blocks to the south is Wild jump, Best New USA Today Brewery of 2019. Known for its unique beers and concoctions, try a flight of local craft beer or mix it up with a savory cocktail made with Wild Leap craft vodka. Housed in the 1948 Westbrook Tire & Service Co., the building’s fashionable restoration won Wild Leap an award for Excellence in Building Rehabilitation by the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.

Wild Leap offers a pet-friendly outdoor courtyard and a large tasting room with a wide range of card and board games. The artisanal drinks, the environment and the friendly service will make you want to drink!

While in the city center, make a pit stop Southbend Park and catch the constant action. Southbend offers a skate park, playground, dog park, pavilion, open green space and access to Thread, the city’s multi-use trail system connecting neighborhoods, attractions and more of LaGrange. Enjoy the air? Enjoy The Thread for leisurely explore the city’s sights on foot!

2. Italian-inspired monuments to write about at home

Inspired by the Campanile in Saint Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy, Callaway Memorial Tower is a must. Erected in 1929 as a tribute to textile mogul Fuller E. Callaway, the lush green lawn is the perfect escape for an afternoon picnic. When it cools down and the foliage begins to change, the monument is just as striking as it was in the warmer months. Whatever the season, this location is ideal for photographs, family recreation or quiet moments of reflection.

Sneak up to Lover’s Lane at Hills & Dales Estate, Callaway’s historic home and gardens. Completed in 1916, the 13,000 square foot Italian-inspired villa is home to one of the best-preserved 19th-century gardens in the country. The estate is designed to flow effortlessly into the gardens – the terraces bordered by a series of dwarf boxwood beds that have graced the hill for over 175 years. To let you in on a little secret: Other famous families are known to visit and take notes on how to preserve their homes.

3. The world famous bite house

Fancy a bite to eat? A trip to LaGrange wouldn’t be complete without stopping for lunch at that of Charlie Joseph. Home of their world famous hot dog, it’s hard to find a free bar stool in downtown at lunchtime! But do not worry ; there is a second location just a few kilometers away. For over a century, Charlie Joseph’s has served classics like chili dogs, burgers and Brunswick Stew.

The restaurant retains its nostalgic vibe with its extensive collection of Coca-Cola memorabilia. Walking into Charlie Joseph’s is like stepping back in time to the days when a packet of chewing gum cost five cents and Coca-Cola was only delivered in glass bottles. In addition to collectibles, the downtown location also sports a Coca-Cola mural on the exterior wall, providing an Instagram-worthy photo op.

4. Hit miles and miles of water

Surrounded by deep forests along the Chattahoochee River, West Point Lake offers 525 miles of shore for your adventures. Known for trophy bass, rent a kayak or pontoon at Highland Pines Resort and Marina to pick up your catch or enjoy dock fishing at Hardley Creek Park, Rocky Point Park and McGee Bridge Park. The search for a fishing guide? We have them too.

Apart from fishing, you can enjoy a variety of water sports and outdoor activities like paddleboarding, hiking, bird watching, camping (off-road, electric and RV options) and watching the sunset over the water.

5. The sweet sounds of live music

Where tall pines sway to the rhythm of a southerly breeze is found Sweetland Amphitheater-the sweetest scene in the south. Opened in 2016, this 2,500-seat amphitheater quickly became a legendary place for locals. Music icons such as Willie Nelson, Gladys Knight and The Temptations graced the stage for star-studded performances.

Carved into the existing hill just north of Lafayette Square, Sweetland is within walking distance of restaurants and shops and close to local hotels and attractions. In winter, Sweetland Amphitheater turns for the season into Sweetland on Ice, a 5,500 square foot outdoor skating rink. Rental skates and concessions are available including delicious hot chocolates and craft drinks!

If you are looking for a more intimate and discreet place, consult the program on Pure Life Studios. Located in a renovated warehouse in the historic Hillside district of LaGrange, the 130-seat listening room welcomes local, regional and national talent in a warm environment. Just a five-minute drive from downtown, Pure Life Studios sets the stage for a harmonious night’s sleep. Did we mention that it is approved for brown bags? Yes, feel free to BYOB.

Whether you have an entire weekend or just a day to spend at LaGrange, the city is sure to keep you entertained. With a mix of indoor and outdoor activities, legendary food, and award-winning craft drinks, you’ll be wanting more once you tick these places off your list!


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Overlooked No More: Frances B. Johnston, photographer who defied distinguished standards https://chattahoocheetrace.com/overlooked-no-more-frances-b-johnston-photographer-who-defied-distinguished-standards/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://chattahoocheetrace.com/overlooked-no-more-frances-b-johnston-photographer-who-defied-distinguished-standards/ This article is part of Overlooked, a series of obituaries of notable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, were not reported in The Times. Frances B. Johnston, one of the first women in the United States to lead a long and successful career as a professional photographer, evidently had such an indelible personality that it’s […]]]>

This article is part of Overlooked, a series of obituaries of notable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, were not reported in The Times.

Frances B. Johnston, one of the first women in the United States to lead a long and successful career as a professional photographer, evidently had such an indelible personality that it’s hard to believe she could have been forgotten.

Without being intimidated by obstacles encountered by others of her gender and happy to shake up those easily shocked, she demonstrated her character early on with an 1896 self-portrait titled “The New Woman”, in which she is seated. profile next to a fireplace, her dress pulled up to reveal a petticoat ribbon. In his right hand is a cigarette, in his left hand a mug of beer. For an even more sustained self-portrait, she assumed a male figure from head to toe, with mustache and pants.

Johnston was a reliable storyteller and drinking companion who traveled the country taking photographs across the social spectrum. She has portrayed celebrities in the White House; reported coal mines in West Virginia and Mammoth Cave in Kentucky; touted educational opportunities at two recently founded black colleges; celebrated the great estates of the upper classes; and furthered the cause of American architectural preservation by documenting hundreds of surviving examples from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

His success has been fueled by prodigious energy and self-confidence, an ability to shoot highly skilled images with bulky view cameras, and a mind-boggling disregard for distinguished standards.

In speeches and in printed matter, she called on other women to follow her example. Her blunt and practical advice was offered in an 1897 article for the Ladies’ Home Journal titled “What a Woman Can Do With a Camera”: “The woman who makes photography profitable must have common sense in terms of personal qualities. , unlimited patience to carry her through endless failures, equally unlimited tact, good taste, a keen eye, a knack for detail and a genius for hard work. In addition, it needs training, experience, capital and land to exploit.

During his lifetime, photography underwent a series of technological innovations which encouraged his ambition. It benefited from the introduction in the 1890s of a reliable halftone process, which made photographic reproduction commercially viable for newspapers and magazines. His images of women in New England shoe factories during that decade were broadcast on a US premier news service. Its founder, George Grantham Bain, was in fact its agent until 1910.

She also portrayed prominent figures of the time, including Susan B. Anthony, Mark Twain, and journalist Joel Chandler Harris, as well as five presidents: Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, and William Howard Taft. She captured Admiral George Dewey and his crew aboard the flagship cruiser Olympia after returning from the Battle of Manila in 1899. She incidentally took the last photograph of McKinley before his assassination in 1901, and it has been widely reproduced.

In the 1920s, she turned to gardens and rural estates in Europe and the United States, publishing her photos in Town & Country, Vogue and House Beautiful magazines. She and her camera have been welcomed into the homes of Astors, Vanderbilts, Whitneys, and other Golden Age plutocrats. In 1925 Edith Wharton asked Johnston to photograph her villa near Paris.

Much of Johnston’s life was spent in the second half of documenting historic architecture in nine prewar southern states. Supported by grants from the Carnegie Corporation in the 1930s, it produced some 7,500 negatives. Two books of his works have been published – “The Early Architecture of North Carolina: A Pictorial Survey” (1941) and, posthumously, “The Early Architecture of Georgia” (1957).

She started her life with perks that a contemporary like, say, photojournalist Jessie Tarbox Beals didn’t have.

Frances Benjamin Johnston was born January 15, 1864 in Grafton, WV, and raised in Washington to well-off parents. Her father, Anderson Doniphan Johnston, was an accountant in the Treasury Department. Her mother, Frances Antoinette Benjamin Johnston, was one of the first women to become a political reporter for the Baltimore Sun. She was also a drama critic for the newspaper, under the pseudonym “Ione”.

Johnston graduated from Notre Dame of Maryland Collegiate Institute for Young Ladies before coming to Paris to study drawing and painting at the Académie Julien. Upon her return to Washington in 1886, she continued her studies at the Art Students League, intending to become a magazine illustrator.

The switch to photography, she said, was prompted by a gift in 1888 from family friend George Eastman: an early model of her first celluloid film camera. His parents organized training with Thomas Smillie, the first official photographer and curator of photography at the Smithsonian Institution. Through the contacts he provided, she traveled to Europe and met prominent artists of the time. In 1894, she knew enough about her trade to open a portrait studio in Washington, the only woman suspected of operating one at the time.

Johnston’s fame today is largely based on the photo album she made in 1899 at the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia (now Hampton University). Established in 1868 to educate newly freed slaves from the South (and, after 1878, Native Americans), it was mixed and residential. Johnston and an assistant spent a month comprehensively illustrating the school’s myriad of teaching courses, from physics to animal husbandry, and teaching photography to interested students.

Booker T. Washington, a Hampton graduate, asked him to do something similar for his Tuskegee Institute in Alabama (now Tuskegee University). She did so in 1902, despite a near-death experience when she and a group of African American men she was traveling with at night were pursued by a mob of white vigilantes. One of her narrowly escaped comrades, George Washington Carver, called her “the bravest woman I have ever seen.”

Over 100 of Hampton’s photographs were featured at the 1900 Paris Exposition in an Exhibition on Black Americans, organized by WEB Du Bois and others to highlight the social progress African Americans have made in the United States. . He received a grand prize as well as favorable reviews in the European and African-American press.

At the same time, upon her election as a delegate to the International Congress of Photography in Paris, Johnston organized a landmark exhibition of 142 photographs of 28 American female photographers; he then traveled to Russia.

Alfred Stieglitz published two of his photographs in his journal “Camera Notes” in 1898 and 1899. But in the decades that followed, she strayed so far from artistic orbits that in 1942, when the arts impresario Lincoln Kirstein stumbled across an anonymous leather-bound wallet of Hampton’s photographs at an antique bookstore in Washington, unsure who made them.

He showed the images to John Szarkowski, then director of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, who was also taken aback. After eventually identifying Johnston as the author, the museum made up for its bewilderment by exhibiting 43 of the photographs in 1966 and publishing a small catalog. A significantly expanded version of the Hampton album was released by MoMA in 2019.

Johnston never married but had an intense affair in the 1910s with Mattie Hewitt, a divorced woman and fellow photographer. Friendships and professional associations were easier. One of her longest relationships was with Huntley Ruff, her African-American driver and assistant in the 1930s and 1940s, to whom she bequeathed her large automobile.

Making money with his photography has always been a higher priority for Johnston than getting into art. “A good job must sell for a good price, and the wise woman will give a paying value to her best efforts,” she advised in 1897. She considered herself an honest craftswoman. “I leave the tour angles to Margaret Bourke-White and surrealism to Salvador Dalí,” she told an interviewer in 1947.

Johnston died on May 16, 1952 in New Orleans, in a townhouse on Bourbon Street which she named “Arkady”. She was 88 years old. Over 20,000 of his photographs, as well as 3,700 glass and film negatives, are now held in the Library of Congress. She never had a full museum retrospective.


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